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  • HoneyCombs Saffron American Extract Alcohol Free (Liquid), 1 oz
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HoneyCombs Saffron American Extract Alcohol Free (Liquid), 1 oz


Price: $15.95 + $4.49 shipping
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by HoneyCombs Herbs & Vitamins.
  • Liquid Saffron, American Extract
  • Non-alcoholic Form
  • Approx: One Month Supply

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Important Information

Ingredients
Natural vegetable glycerine, Catalyst altered water, Saffron, American.

Directions
Use as Directed

Product Description

HoneyCombs Industries American Saffron Extract -- 1 oz.

HoneyCombs Industries American Saffron Extract is a non-alcoholic liquid extract. It contains no sugar, salt, starch, yeast, wheat, gluten, corn, soy, milk, egg, shellfish or preservatives. As an herbal dietary supplement, take 1 to 2 full droppers daily with a meal. One dropper is equal to 1/4 teaspoon.


Product Details

  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S.
  • ASIN: B0001ITVBU
  • UPC: 839210008809
  • Average Customer Review: 2.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #284,649 in Beauty (See Top 100 in Beauty)
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Customer Reviews

2.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 49 people found the following review helpful By James A. Hose on October 14, 2011
Verified Purchase
I found this product on here looking to see if Saffron (Crocus sativus) might be available in a liquid extract/tincture. Great, I thought here's one. And grown in America, even better. Product came in a timely fashion. I had a taste, and thought, this is quite good. But... not very "saffrony." With a sinking feeling, I looked at the front label and below "American Saffron Extract" it clearly reads "Crocus sativus," the scientific name for Saffron, the stuff grown in the Mediterranean that makes rice yellow, and with various health benefits. But on the side of the label with the "Facts" it reads: "SAFFLOWER extract." Uh-oh, I thought, this is NOT Saffron. So, I did a little reading and found out that American Saffron is another name for Safflower (Carthamus tinctoris), a different plant altogether. Safflower is the same safflower used to make safflower cooking oil. The flower has been used for medicinal purposes for quite some time, as well. Edgar Cayce recommended it for digestive ailments and psoriasis. Other sources claim it is good for the immune system. All well and good, but its still not Saffron. In fact, American Saffron goes by names like "Bastard Saffron" and "False Saffron." You may wonder why I gave this two stars instead of say, one, especially since they misrepresent it on the VERY LABEL (though if you will notice the label on the product picture does NOT show any scientific/latin name under the common name). Looking around Amazon at other American Saffron products I found another unsatisfied reviewer who was lured into thinking he or she was purchasing Saffron, only to find out what I did about the whole Saffron/American "Saffron" debacle. I'm taking some responsibility for not Googling American Saffron. This stuff really does taste good, and will flavor my tea nicely, at least. For a while, too, since I bought THREE BOTTLES.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Cathy Uchiek on October 31, 2011
HoneyCombs Saffron American Extract Alcohol Free (Liquid)Another person mentioned in his review that this product is not real saffron. I would like to thank him for pointing that out. I almost bought it under the pretense that it was "real". Back to the drawing board!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By diane on February 28, 2012
Verified Purchase
Take note of the ingredents - no saffron. Exerpt from
[...]

In "Herbs, Spices and Flavorings" (Overlook Press: 1982), author Tom Stobart writes, "Good saffron should not be more than a year old, of a brilliant orange color--not yellow, bleached or with white streaks--with a strong perfume and a pungent, bitter, medicinal, honey-like taste. In genuine saffron, the stigma expands immediately when a pinch is placed on the surface of warm water, and the color easily diffuses out. Cheap saffron does not exist, so any bargain should be suspect."

Fortunately, it takes only a small amount of saffron to flavor and color food. The classic use is in bouillabaisse, but saffron is commonly used in fish soups and stews, breads, cakes and biscuits. The spice is used by some people for medicinal purposes and also produces a strong yellow dye.

Incidentally, the saffron crocus should not be confused with meadow saffron (Colchicum autumnale) a poisonous variety with pink flowers, each having six stamens.

The other herb, safflower (Carthamus tinctorius), is an annual that is not related to saffron. Safflower produces shaggy orange-yellow flowers used primarily to produce dyes for fabric and cosmetics. Although some people use an infusion from the flowers for medicinal purposes, Lesley Bremness, author of "The Complete Book of Herbs" (Viking Studio Books, 1988: $24.95) warns, "Do not take large amounts during pregnancy."

Safflower is also cultivated for its seeds, which are pressed to produce oil. This is used for cooking, but the oil doesn't impart any color to the food.
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Verified Purchase
I bought this because I read it helps with mild depression. Maybe whatever cause there is for MY mild depression isn't being addressed with this stuff and that's why it didn't work for ME. I'm finding better results with TURMERIC capsules and using organic Apple Cider Vinegar with meals.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Parris Larrain on April 8, 2012
Verified Purchase
This is a small vial of concentrated saffron. I don't have all the information I need to discuss this. I know Dr. Oz recommends buying a $30 jar of saffron and taking a small amount per day steadily. But when I saw this, I thought I'd check it out. My opinion is still out.
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