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Hooked Hardcover – August 9, 2011


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers (August 9, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385740085
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385740081
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,988,111 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Hooked is Catherine Greenman’s first novel. She is a native New Yorker and still lives in the city, with her husband and children.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1.

I met Will Weston during a fire drill on a gray, freezing February Monday, a few days after I turned seventeen. I was in metal shop when the bells went off, and had to go outside in my smock. Why didn't they have fire drills during homeroom, when we still had our coats? I hid behind a tree to block the wind, and as I studied the gloomy, red-bricked façade of the school for any signs of real fire, I spotted him. Will was leaning against the stone wall, hugging himself in a thin, black sweater. He was tall and he had large, square, hulking shoulders that reminded me of Frankenstein--an aberration in a sea of boys with shoulders so narrow you could lift them off the ground by grabbing their knapsack straps together in one hand. This guy looked too old for high school. His chin was ducked toward his chest and he stared at me forever, and it was clear that he didn't care that I noticed. I remember looking around, wishing there was someone to talk to, but I was surrounded by the dicks from metal shop. Metal shop was the great dick-alizer--we all behaved like we were in preschool, cutting each other in the soldering lines, hogging the drying shelves, all for the easy As Mr. Blake was famous for doling out. It was not lost on me that an A from Blake would finally kick my average up to an A-minus, a longtime hurdle. Anyway, one minute Will was undressing me from afar, and then he just appeared, as if in a blink.

"Blake or Dolan?" he asked, peering into my face.

"Uh . . . Blake," I said, cursing my telltale gingham smock.

"I had him. A girl in my class lost her eye."

"You were in Lisa Kwan's class?" I asked, marveling.

"I was." He nodded modestly.

"What happened? He told us she poked it out."

"Her vise was loose," he said. We both tried not to smile. "You don't use them anymore, vises. Right?"

"No, everything's on the table," I explained. "He helps you when you need to make a cut. He's sick of me. I'm always recutting." I realized then that there was something weird about his eyes: the left eye was looking at me, but the right eye drifted off toward the Hudson River. It was both off-putting and death-defyingly hot. It also somehow made him seem too smart for me. I wondered if he was a brainiac, like everyone else at Stuyvesant High School, where I'd somehow landed like an alien on the wrong planet. In math and science, at least, which Stuy held sacred above all else, I was the opposite of a brainiac. Not quite a dumbass, but close. I felt like I was working twice as hard to do half as well as anyone else.

"You'll get an A," he said, rubbing his forearms for warmth. "Don't worry. Has he shown you his oliver?"

"His what?" I asked, thinking, He has the most beautiful hair: brown, wavy, and longer than I initially thought.

"His oliver."

"Oh God. Don't tell me. Another pervy--"

"Go on, ask him to see the oliver," he said. "He'll love you if you ask him."

"What is it?"

"You don't want to be surprised?" he teased.

Part of me did, but I shook my head.

"It's his silver tin of green olives," he whispered, so that the metal-shop dicks couldn't hear. "He keeps it in his pocket for martinis. 'Always keep your oliver on your person.' That's what he used to say. You're a junior?"

I nodded.

"I had him freshman year. He's toned it down since then. I think he's a less-happy drunk these days."

"Aren't we all," I said.

"Settle down there, Dorothy Parker." He held out his hand. "I'm Will Weston."

"Thea Galehouse," I said.

"I know." He smiled proudly.

"How do you know?"

"That yearbook picture of you, sleeping on the desk. Your name was in the caption. 'Thea takes a breather' or something stupid like that. Was that during a class? Or homeroom?"

"Homeroom, I think. I was tired."

"No shit. I could never sleep like that. In the middle of everyone. I wish I could. You have the same hair still. Like wet grass stuck to your face." He pushed a clump of loose hair into my cheek with his thumb as people started to stream back into the building. "Anyway, don't stress about Blake." Will took the steps two at a time, so I did too. "He skews it to the pretty ones."

We got inside the double doors and I faced him. "Do I look stressed out?"

"Little bit."

I hate offhand comments about my moods. My mother still makes them constantly. But the way he said it made me think, Maybe I am stressing out about stupid freaking metal shop.

"You know," Will said, "ever since I saw that picture of you, all schlumped out all over that desk, I've wanted to meet you. Do you like burgers?"

"Love 'em," I said.

"Have a burger with me, then."

He said it in the nicest way. It was one of the shining moments of my life. A total shock and yet right as rain.

The huge oil painting of peg-legged Peter Stuyvesant, our school's namesake, loomed over Will by the staircase. School, the place where we spent so much of our time, was so deathly dreary at that moment. It was like Will put it all--the gray walls pockmarked with painted-over thumbtack holes, the gummy stair railings that made your hands smell like spit--into relief. He glanced at a short girl in clogs walking by. She almost stopped to talk, then didn't. He looked back at me and I got the first jolt. The first java jolt. The first whiff of desire for his big, scary, manly-man body. And the desperation to be included in his thoughts. Me, Thea.


 

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Customer Reviews

Hooked is a great story showcasing wonderful writing and characters.
Savannah (Books With Bite)
I didn't think what Will wanted after this was that bad, and it seemed even reasonable to at least consider.
Ellen W.
I just felt like once the story was over, I didn't really care about any of them.
Stacey B.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Brandi Breathes Books on June 26, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a gritty yet funny at time contemporary. I think that we get a unique view into being pregnant and being a teen mom, and I think that it's an important message. As much as Thea tries at times, she cannot romanticize the idea, especially when her boyfriend Will makes it where she can't stay with him for a while. Though I liked this book and what it tried to convey, I was left feeling like there is nothing that will make me remember it a year from now. I still think that its worth reading.
I think that all aspects of characters were done well, Thea was fleshed out, and she had things I could relate to, perfections and faults alike. Will was dreamy at first and then gave a real picture of what happens a lot when a girl gets pregnant and there is a child brought into that relationship at such a young age. Thea's parents are far from perfect, but I really liked how her dad stepped up in the end whereas I wouldn't have expected that. I got to read about a dynamic that is not all that present in the books I read, the father daughter one.
I also like the stages the book goes through, we get to see the beginning and development of Thea's relationship with Will, and how she is completely hooked on him-to the extent that she doesn't really pay much attention to anything else. What a familiar feeling that is though, the new relationship and the obsession.
This book took on a whole other dimension with Thea's crocheting. It interested me because I can crochet a bit, and it played a role in a book of helping her to distract herself and also in the end helping to find herself some.
The ending wasn't tied up completely, but I think that is also life, and hers really was just beginning, so I think that is fitting in its own aspects.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By OpheliasOwn VINE VOICE on July 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
After reading Bumped, a dystopia about teenage pregnancy for profit, I had to prove to myself that my issues with Bumped weren't about the idea of teenage pregnancy. Instead, my issue was that it was just a silly book. Period. So I picked up Hooked by Catherine Greenman with one purpose in mind- prove to myself I was open to all kinds of Young Adult novels- even YA about tough subjects. I have one thing to say- This book proved it.

Thea is the product of a now-sober alcoholic father and a flighty mother who is more concerned with her own life than that of her daughter she is supposed to be raising. Despite a somewhat absentee father (even when he was physically present) and mother, Thea turned out ok. She was doing decently in her competitive high school, was your average, well-rounded young woman, and had some good friends. When she met Will, it was your typical first love. She felt hooked by her love for him; she needed him to love her as much as she loved him.

When Will graduated, he decided to stay in the city and go to Columbia University. At some point in the beginning of the year, Thea becomes pregnant. At first, she is stunned, but she tells her mother and decides to have an abortion. While her best friend and her mom offer to go with her, Thea decides to do it on her own. When she sees the sonogram, though, she can't imagine getting rid of the little person inside her. She panics and leaves the clinic, but doesn't tell anyone about her situation. When it becomes too late for an abortion, she finally admits to Will, her mom, and finally tells her father the truth: she is still pregnant and plans to have the baby.

At first everyone is angry with Thea for a host of reasons, but most importantly for keeping this from them for so long.
Read more ›
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Cathy Goodwin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Every so often a YA book comes along that seems to deal with adult problems. Hooked is one of those books -targeted to a YA audience with a grown-up scenario.

Thea is 17, attending a prestigious high school but not motivated to achieve academically. She's comfortably well off. Her parents are divorced from each other and from their own complicated pasts.

Thea meets Will, who's a year ahead of her, and she falls in love. She begins to neglect her schoolwork. Her father is horrified. Then Thea gets pregnant, accidentally, and her life changes radically. She's uncomfortable with being a mom yet she wants to be a good one. Her parents help. Along the way Thea figures out what she wants to do with her life and builds new ties to her own family.

What makes the book work is awesome writing and three-dimensional characters. Thea and Will have a complex relationship. Thea's parents are flawed but ultimately caring people. Thea herself seems to grow and become more of her own person.

On the downside, the plot has a familiar ring. Young woman has serious problem, finds her way out (almost by accident), gets support from unexpected places and moves on. The book delivered a lot of heart but could have used a few elements of surprise.

Since I"m rarely around teenagers, I don't have a sense of how they'd resonate to the book. They'd probably agree that high school can be boring, although Thea doesn't take the initiative to get involved. In her one memorable yearbook photo, she's sleeping. The book introduces a lot of "only in New York" detail, which may or may not be attractive to the YA audience outside the East Coast.
I'm not sure that a pregnant teen story will be seen as unusual, but the strong writing and unusual characters will keep many readers ... hooked.
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