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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book
Hi, I'd like to start off by saying I am a U.S. Marine and I am also currently deployed to afghanistan. I normally do not write book reviews but in this case the book is of great help. I normally spend my time on daily 3, 4, 5, or even more hour patrols. Whenever I sit down and get break I think to my self why, why the F*** do i do this. Then I read one of the random...
Published on June 3, 2010 by E. Montanez

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170 of 211 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shameless debauchery
A raunchy egomaniac and his offensive, shameless stories. Wow. It's like bungee-jumping into the middle of the mosh pit at a fraternity grain party. I'm one of those girls who liked the Tucker book. Well, actually this is sort of a mixed review. The first story I read was the Tucker tries(...). I nearly peed myself it was so funny. For shock value and out of control...
Published on May 4, 2009 by D. Muron


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170 of 211 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shameless debauchery, May 4, 2009
A raunchy egomaniac and his offensive, shameless stories. Wow. It's like bungee-jumping into the middle of the mosh pit at a fraternity grain party. I'm one of those girls who liked the Tucker book. Well, actually this is sort of a mixed review. The first story I read was the Tucker tries(...). I nearly peed myself it was so funny. For shock value and out of control laughs, you could stop after that story and be satisfied. The next story I read was pretty funny. The next brought a few chuckles, and by the fifth I was getting bored. Vomit and poopy pants is only shocking and funny once; not a dozen stories in a row. It seems pretty obvious that he decided early on to "never let the truth get in the way of a good story". However, once you get over that literary hurdle of discovery, there are some really funny parts.

Don't get me wrong, if you like comedy and can overcome the frat-i-tude its worth reading a few of the stories. For the price of 2 drinks, there are few things to read for such out of control laughs right out of the gate. I don't mean to knock Tucker, not that he'd care. I assumed by the content, writing and vocabulary this was written by a college freshman. When I later learned he's a 30ish attorney, I was shocked. Hopefully his next book he'll sharpen his pencil and delve a tad deeper into the memoir craft.

For readers, I hope this tip helps. (It sure would have helped me). I recommend taking this book in small doses. Limit yourself to reading one story every few days, and you'll love it. As for Tucker fans who are getting bored waiting for his sequel, there's another hilarious book right up this alley that takes it a whole notch higher.

High Heels and Dirty Deals - Globetrotting Tales of Debauchery from a Binge-drinking Nymphomaniac
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42 of 52 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Man With One (Stupid) Joke, July 24, 2012
People hate this book for a lot of reasons. It is not well-written, for one thing. There are numerous grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors, as well as missing words. Tucker is also not a particularly unique narrator or character. People have enjoyed watching obnoxious jerks wreck havoc since the days of Aristophanes on down to the cast of Seinfeld, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia or The League. The problem is that the folks in those sitcoms are arguably way funnier than Tucker Max ever is, most likely because they have talented writers working behind them.

And therein lies the rift between those who love Tucker and those who don't: the humor.

Tucker Max has one joke -- "Look how rude/drunk/sexist I am! CAPITAL LETTERS MEAN I'M YELLING!" -- and the formula does not vary. If you happen to like Tucker's one joke, I can understand you enjoying part of the book, but the joke is told over and over, and without much panache or wit. Some of what he considers funny is actually baffling to me, since it sounds so obviously puerile and childish. Tucker Max still thinks it's hilarious to call people "nerds," makes fun of his buddy for having a black best friend, and attacks fat people who happen to be walking by. "If this were Lord of the Flies, you'd be dead already," he says to a "kinda fat" guy. Ha ha! Because he's fat, you see. That "joke" contains the essence of every other joke Max has to say: obviousness, stupidity, and a lack of originality.

So why have his books sold so well? Tucker's obnoxious and mean, and because he gets away with it, he pleases readers a) who wish they could also be obnoxious and mean (and probably also as sexually successful as Max allegedly is), b) who enjoy watching others be obnoxious and mean for no good reason, and c) who are also obnoxious and mean. If you enjoyed Tucker Max's stories or books, it is for one of these three reasons: envy, misanthropy, or douchebaggery. (If you can claim to like these stories on any other level, I'd like to hear your excuse. And I mean "like" the stories, not find them interesting on a sociological, psychological, or other level.)

If -- and it's a big IF -- If Tucker Max's abuse was even marginally intelligent or unique, there might be something to recommend it. Unfortunately, the majority of his insults are either cribbed from other sources (everything from The Simpsons to Winston Churchill) or just sloppy and lazy (e.g. he says a fat girl is suffering from hoof-and-mouth disease, because she's fat like a cow, you see). The book reads like the soulless struggle of a wanna-be stand-up comedian who has never bothered to write good material because he is surrounded by friends who both encourage and endure his watered down "witticisms." At one point in his most recent book (Sloppy Seconds), a friend called SippyCup is insulting a fat girl because he doesn't like fat girls. Inexplicably, Tucker Max acts as if this behavior is uncalled for, and even types, "Funny requires intelligence and mental dexterity: it's not about hurting the person..." However, the only "mental dexterity" that Max shows is the cognitive dissonance needed to say things like this without realizing how deeply contradictory he's being.

In a recent interview with Forbes, Max finally admits that "if you read between the lines a little bit, in between all the bravado, you can see a lot of self-loathing." You don't have to read between the lines at all, though. In the same book -- without a trace of irony -- he complains about "tools" and "obnoxious jerks," describing them in the exact same words he uses elsewhere to describe himself. He yells at people for doing the very things he does, and then excuses his behavior by claiming that he's "smarter" or "wittier," when ultimately he's just louder and less caring. He tries everything in his power to get under people's skin (in more ways than one), and when he is called on his antisocial behavior or rebuffed, his go-to line is "F*** 'em if they can't take a joke."

The joke, however, is on Tucker Max. And the fact that he is only just now realizing this (as he says in the Forbes interview) shows you even further that these books were not a way to lampoon himself or a world that celebrates narcissistic violence. They are stories that, in their own vicious, repetitive, and mindless way, represent an ignorant co-mingling of self-love and -hate. Even if you like that sort of thing, there are much smarter and better-written books out there that deal with it, ones that are aware of their own irony and that have something better to prove than their own vomit-drenched version of nihilism.

In case you absolutely must know what Tucker Max's stories are like, I have created here a handy Build-A-Story to help you write your own. Have fun.

Roll a Dice: In your story you are (1,2) drunk and rude, (3,4) rude and sexed up, (5,6) drunk and rude and sexed up.
Roll Again: Your story takes place (1,2) in a public place around mostly strangers (e.g. a Muslim wedding is wacky!), (3,4) in a public place around mostly friends (e.g. a Vegas bar), (5,6) in a private place with friends and/or a misguided lover.
Roll Again: (1) You make fun of a fat person. (2) You make fun of a "nerd" (whatever that is). (3) You make fun of a slut. (4) You make fun of a person's culture or implied heritage. (5) You make fun of a weak or frightened person. (6) You speak IN CAPITAL LETTERS. [If you are unaccustomed to making fun of people, do not attempt any baroque comparisons. Stick with the basics, i.e., ask a fat person if they have "freed Willy" yet, or tell a nerd to suck on your "Monty Python."]
Roll Again: (1,2) You puke/pass out. (3,4) You have sex/get into a fight. (5,6) You have sex/get into a fight, and then puke/pass out.

Sample Story: (dice=3) Interested readers, let me tell you this awesome story about how rude I was to this girl that still slept with me. (dice=2) I was hanging out at the Chuck E. Cheese ball pen and had no idea how I got there. "I wish I was drunk," I thought. (dice=5) A scared seven year-old girl asked me to please leave the ball pen, and I told her that there was no god. She cried and ran off, and I suddenly realized there WAS a god: me! (dice=4) That's when I grabbed a waitress with a pizza and said, "Guess what my favorite topping is? PepperBONE-ME!" Ha ha ha! Zing! I don't need to tell you whose ball pen that waitress stayed at that night. My ball pen, that's whose. Because I'm referring to my crotch. The end. Oh, and this story was totally true.
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202 of 268 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars crude and stupid, yes. Funny? Not so much, October 9, 2008
Tucker Max admits he's a jerk but he somehow thinks recounting endless vomiting sessions, discussing the many times he's acted like a shallow, abusive pig, and relaying the details of his bodily fluid excretions is worth a book. There are a few funny bits _ the Breathalyzer one at the beginning comes to mind _ but it all gets tedious really fast. It's frat-boy trash humor by a pampered kid who thinks he's being cute or profound, or something. You want to grab this idiot by the throat, shake him and say: "Grow up and care about someone else!" That said, maybe the book goes down better after a few shots of Jaegermeister. Better yet, save your money for the booze.
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133 of 176 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Yawn. College again?, October 29, 2008
Ok, the book looked interesting, I had seven hours of air travel ahead, what the heck?

Flight takes off, so I begin reading the first chapter. ok, not so bad. Makes me even a little excited thinking about my pre-married with children days, and I am on my way to Vegas to boot! Perfect combination, at least until I got a couple of chapters into the book and realized that it sucked. it was poorly written, not at all riveting, and not original or thought provoking. By less than a quarter into the book, I started rooting against Max, hoping that he would pass out from doing 20-something shots and split his head open. I hoped he would get crabs. I wanted to read about the girl he knocked up. But except for one joke from a pissed off former girlfriend, none of that ever came to pass. Bummer.

Like previous posters said, if I want to hear stories about drunken boys getting laid I will hang out with my old school buddies, people I care about. Tucker, I just never cared about you or the shameless way you treated everyone around you. Good luck with your book in a few years called, "I Hope They Prescribe Rogain in Hell".
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Adventures of the Invincible Misogynist, January 22, 2011
By 
R. McOuat (Winston-Salem, NC) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The day Max was banished to college by his billionaire father, he was overcome by libido and had fermented yeast dumped into his stomach. To make matters worse, his mutant ability to exploit insecure sorority girls activated just as he was hit by a blast of Jaegermeister. Over the course of the character's 7 years of existence, from college through law school, The Misogynist has, at some point or another, had various combinations of the following powers and abilities:

Vision - His senses grant him the ability to discern promiscuous sorority girls with greater accuracy and detail than normally humanly possible.

Eidetic memory - The Misogynist is occasionally shown to have flawless, total recall of everything he has ever seen, read or heard even while completely inebriated.

Invulnerability - His invulnerability protects his body from almost all forms of physical harm including STDs, police officers, and jealous boyfriends. Includes the immunity to most known diseases, viruses and toxins.

Super genius-level intelligence - These enhanced mental capabilities permit him to get into the best schools, graduate with honors, and get the best internships even though he does not care about those things.

Inhuman verbal expressive skills - Mortal humans are incapable of resisting his powers of persuasion. The Misogynist is capable of delivering the best pick up lines, worst put-downs and talk his way out of any legal entanglements. Females, especially hot ones, are particularly vulnerable. It is a forgone conclusion that he will open his mouth and their panties will drop.

Immunity to Conscious - casually abandoning his friends to violence or Law Enforcement as he chases more empty pleasures which he will pursue again the next night.

Though largely invulnerable, The Misogynist is not perceived as being too sensational or unbelievable for modern audiences. He's a New York Times best seller. However, midway through the novel, The Misogynist seems unable to create suitable challenges for his powers. His adventures become redundant and predicable. How many ways can a superhero create chaos in public places or publicly humiliate a woman?

One shortcoming of this superhero melodrama is that The Misogynist needs a super villain. I suggest Hamartia. Hamartia could be sent by the gods to impose tragic actions on a The Misogynist for his fatal flaw. The Misogynist, due to some imperfection of character (narcissism), must make a fatal mistake, an error of judgment, which makes him "morally responsible" for the disasters he has caused. Hamartia's power would be to weaken The Misogynist's attitude of superiority and derail his ruthless pursuit of hedonism, and cause him to be trapped in a vortex of morality. In the vortex, The Misogynist is destined to agonize eternally over what he should have done differently if he was a mortal human being rather than a mythical superhero of our popular culture.
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68 of 89 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I hope they serve beer at the writer's workshop., October 6, 2008
I borrowed this book on a deployment when reading material was very scarce. I read a little over half of it before I grew bored. Every story is basically the same. Some guy gets drunk, has sex and does something humiliating or a variation of that formula. The writing is mediocre at best and lacks any memorable prose.
However I think the most irritating part about this book is that the author claims all the stories are true. They are not. Some may be but most are not. Of the 6 stories/chapters I read, 4 stories I had heard before in the early to mid 90s either in college or in the army. They are Frat/Army/Young male urban legends. They always start something like My brother was telling me about this guy in his frat who "Insert drinking/sex/humiliation story here". There is nothing wrong with these stories. I have told a few of them myself. However the main draw of this book seems to be that the stories are true. When they are obviously fiction or at least exaggerations it detracts from the book and makes it sort of silly.
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It's not the content that makes this guy an idiot, August 25, 2009
This review is from: I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell (movie tie-in): with 16 page photo insert (Paperback)
I got about 7 pages in (a friend told me I HAD to read it) and I had to put it down. I was pretty indifferent to the stories; they didn't make me laugh or make me mad. What I couldn't handle was the way the author wrote. While it's clear this guy is proud to be an idiot, the style and grammar in which he wrote likened him to a 9th grader.

I just don't know how people could stand to read something so badly written! Of course it doesn't help that the guy is a joke... but maybe that's the point?

It was just stupid all the way around. If you want to read something then please find a book that makes you think, even if it's just a little bit.
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23 of 29 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It's like hanging with your college buds because you've probably already heard most of these stories, October 12, 2009
This review is from: I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell (movie tie-in): with 16 page photo insert (Paperback)
If you haven't purchased the book yet save your money, go to a bar with your college friends, buy a few beers and reminisce. You'll get the same effect. I had no problem with the morality of Max's book. He gets obscenely drunk with his buddies and brags about it, has sex with random girls and brags about it, verbally bests teenage party goers and brags about it. Yawn. In other words he went to college.
He starts the book off by pronouncing all of his stories to be absolutely true which, as you can imagine, doesn't bode well for the actual validity of his tales. The real truth is that I heard most of these same stories (or variations) while Tucker Max was still in grade school. He repeatedly boasts about his wit and verbal prowess but his jokes are old and hack. When one overweight girl that he had an argument with earlier at a party walks into the kitchen where he is drinking with his friends and opens the refrigerator to get something, his unbelievably witty jab is "Looks like there won't be any leftovers tomorrow!!!" My mind was blown by the originality and razor-edged humor. And almost always, after his tired hacky insults he states that several girls within earshot found it hilarious, approached him and wanted to sleep with him based on this. Sure they did Tucker...sure they did.
The stories in I Hope They Serve Beer come across as being told by a high school kid who has never actually had sex or gotten drunk but wants everyone to think he is an expert and can outdo everyone else. Everything is just a little too outlandish to be taken seriously. It's like watching a movie with huge unrealistic plot holes in it.
If you are still not dissuaded from buying the book and still want to check it out, just go to tuckermax.com. Roughly 2/3 of the books is transcribed directly from blog posts on his website and a very few are actually a little funny at least.
I will hand it to him though, Tucker Max IS a great marketer and self promoter. What Tucker Max isn't is a remotely talented author, genuinely funny, or able to tell an original story.
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57 of 75 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The joke gets old ..., October 2, 2009
By 
Robert L. Field (Deltona, Florida USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
A cluster of stories about an overgrown frat boy whose only recreational activities are getting drunk, insulting people and having anonymous and often degrading sex, I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell doesn't know what it wants to be. It clearly is tangentially related to the "don't be like this guy" comedy of Seth McFarlane, Seth Rogen, et al, but also has millions of adoring frat boy fans who find Max' misogynistic alcoholic scumbag to be a positive role model.

I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell is funny at first, but the sheer repetition becomes numbing and finally appalling. It is difficult not to imagine him actually doing these things, which completely ruins the joke. It might have worked as a cartoon in the vein of the Seths, but as purported true stories, all you can imagine is this scumbag inflicting all this human suffering so he could get a chuckle or an orgasm.

Even by his own declared ethical standard of "bros before hos," the "Max" character (benefit of the doubt) fails, casually abandoning his friends to violence or Law Enforcement as he chases more empty pleasures which he will pursue again the next night.

The one positive thing about this book is that it exposes the frat boy culture as essentially sociopathic at core. For that reason alone, it should be required reading at University orientations.
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68 of 90 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I Could Feel My Soul Whither and Decay With Each Page Read, March 21, 2009
By 
Unfortunately, I read enough of this novel to be able to write the review you will see below. I am sorry that I did, and write this only to discourage others from purchasing his novel.

Tucker Max is an incredibly self-centered, depraved individual. His book's popularity demonstrates that vulgarity can and is promotable in literary form. This book has been spread by word-of-mouth in the same ways that all things awful and degrading gain fame. The only people that would find this book enjoyable are:

1) Those that idolize Tucker's actions and activities, praising him as a king and aspiring to live vicariously through his lifestyle of casual sex and binge drinking.

2) Those that seek to experience a sensation of relief that they don't live a life nearly as loathsome as Tucker's, who weigh themselves on imbalanced scales of morality/depravity and walk away with a false sense of accomplishment.

3) Those that enjoy the shallow humor/entertainment in the degradation of women, recounted by an author who has no empathy for anyone other than himself.

All would still be mistaken to purchase this book. Do not buy this book out of curiosity. Do not buy this book because it's on the New York Times Best Sellers List. Do not buy this book if you show the slightest bit of empathy for women. Tucker is an animal whose contributions to society are increasingly destructive each and every time this novel is purchased.
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I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell (movie tie-in): with 16 page photo insert
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