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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Getting Better
I have to admit that this series is getting better. While the Saga of the Seven Suns is certainly not great science fiction, it is really good sci-fi with characters you grow to care for. The first two books were OK, but this one really ratchets up the suspense as the war with the Hydrogues continues. This time however, betrayals and political intrigue take on epic...
Published on August 28, 2004 by Amazon Customer

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26 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars barely keeping me in, needs to improve
The easiest way to write this review would be to send someone to my review of book one and say "ditto", except not as fun. Which was basically my review of book two. And therein lies the series' problem--if you've read one, you've read them all. That isn't to say the plot doesn't move on, doesn't become more complicated. It does. But that's all that happens. And much of...
Published on September 17, 2004 by B. Capossere


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26 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars barely keeping me in, needs to improve, September 17, 2004
The easiest way to write this review would be to send someone to my review of book one and say "ditto", except not as fun. Which was basically my review of book two. And therein lies the series' problem--if you've read one, you've read them all. That isn't to say the plot doesn't move on, doesn't become more complicated. It does. But that's all that happens. And much of the plot complication is based upon themes and plot we've seen before. King Peter and Chairman Basil edge nearer and nearer to outright confrontation, but we saw the basis of this two books and hundreds and hundreds of pages ago. The roamers are forced through their shades-of-MacGyver ingenuity to survive the unsurvivable, escape the inescapable, figure out the un-figure-outable. And as we saw in book one and two, they do. Water elementals are added to the mix, but we've seen their three brethren already so this comes as no surprise. The Klix (sp) robots are evil and deceptive, but we've seen this before. It would be different if one had a sense the plot was deepening, but it feels more like it's simply expanding. The same is true of the characters. Though as before, one or two stand out as better and more fully drawn, more compelling, in a cast of dozens that's somewhat damning with faint praise. And stylistically, the books don't seem to be getting any better. At one point a character trying to show determination both grits her teeth and lifts her chin; I'll give you a few cliches in a large book but not two in the same sentence. The first book drowned out (for the most part) these flaws with it sheer inventiveness and sense of fun, but books two and three lack that spark and so are no where near as enjoyable. One reads to see what happens (though I'm very close to not caring at this point) and that's it, not for the pleasure of reading. Had Anderson shrunk the first three books into two shorter ones, the flaws would be less obvious and the story may have carried me along past them. At this point I'm going to drag myself into book four only because I'm an optimist and I read fast. But I would not recommend this series at this point to new readers unless it picks up drastically in book four. There's too much good out there to invest time in a series that doesn't do much past book one.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Getting Better, August 28, 2004
I have to admit that this series is getting better. While the Saga of the Seven Suns is certainly not great science fiction, it is really good sci-fi with characters you grow to care for. The first two books were OK, but this one really ratchets up the suspense as the war with the Hydrogues continues. This time however, betrayals and political intrigue take on epic proportions: humanity is at war with humanity; civil war is brewing inside the Ildiran worlds. But we also have a greater understanding of the various alien entities: the Hydrogues, the Faeoros, Verdani (World Trees), and the interesting Wentals. Anderson has certainly created some original characters. My greatest complaint with this series has always been the drawn-out story. There are too many characters and the story could certainly use some better editing. That being said, Anderson has my attention and I look forward to the next book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great extension of the series, August 16, 2004
By 
Well, after finishing the book in two days I am left feeling sad, knowing that I have to wait until the next book is released. The Saga of the Seven Suns series has been a tremendous surprise for me and has become one of my favorite series of all time. In this third book, the plots begin to thicken with betrayals and the focus being closer to the characters and the various races than on the external war. This is one of those series in which I have truly begun to care for the chracters, and about what happens to them. I find myself actually annoyed or upset when something bad happens to them, and that is a true sign of a great book. If you didn't like the first two you probably won't like this one, but for me that certainly wasn't a concern. I highly reccomend it if you liked the first two books.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Saga Continues..., September 7, 2004
O.k., how do I rate this? That is the question. I feel that it's important that this book be rated by the standard set by the series. It should therefore be more harshly judged than Terry Pratchet, but not as harshly judged as George RR Martin.

One problem with the book is the characters become dumb as a brick, which was also a problem in "Hidden Empire", although they seemed somewhat more intellegent in "A Forest of Stars" (which is currently the best in the series). But the fact remainst that I have come to care about these characters, and can continue to do so.

In the end all series are judged by:

1. The author creates likeable characters, situations, and places that can make you suspend disbelief.

and

2. The author makes them work together, for instance a truly hard-science world like "2001" wouldn't have people as dumb as these, but this world can hold them properly.

In addition to that KJA made a comment in an interview, which makes me add another standard to this book, at his request:

3. The author must, unlike Robert Jordan or George RR Martin, get his books in on time, and give us a new one each year.

So far he has succeeded in all three criteria, and I can only find that the book entertains at a 4-star level.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Desperation Measures, October 19, 2006
By 
Horizon Storms (2004) is the third SF novel in The Saga of the Seven Suns, following A Forest of Stars. In the previous volume, Theroc is rescued from a devastating hydrogue attack by the faeros, but the Worldforest and population losses are severe. On Ildira, Prime Designate Jora'h became the Mage-Imperator.

At Rendezvous, Cesca Peroni learned that Jess Tamblyn has disappeared. On an uncharted water world, Jess found himself stranded amidst a new colony of wentals. In the Whisper Palace, Chairman Basil Wenceslas decided to colonize other planets through the Klikiss gates. In Maratha Prime, Anton Colicos and Rememberer Vao'sh settled in to enjoy the peace and quiet by studying the Saga of the Seven Suns. From her Manta, Tasia Tamblyn witnessed the snuffing of the Oncier sun by the hydrogues.

In this novel, from Whisper Palace King Peter announces a new campaign against the hydrogues using the Klikiss torch. After the ignition of the torch, he shows the broken remains of hydrogue ships to celebrating crowds on Earth. Then he lights a much smaller torch on the Royal Bridge to symbolize the victory.

On Mars, Tasia Tamblyn receives orders to use the Klikiss torch on Ptoro, an obscure planet on the fringes of human space. Her battle group sets up the wormhole generators and prepares to send a neutron star into Ptoro. Then they fire their torpedoes.

On Ptoro, DD meets human prisoners held by the hydrogues. Among them is Robb Brindle, the long lost friend of Tasia. The prisoners ask DD for help in escaping the hydrogues, but they really have little chance of leaving their quarters alive. Then the neutron star arrives and the planet becomes a star.

On Ildira, the Mage-Imperator Jora'h gathers the Designates together for the ceremony giving his father back to the light, leaving only his skeleton. After the ceremony, Jora'h is contemplating the misdeeds of his father, but his son Thor'h, the Prime Designate, interrupts his thoughts by bullying his way past the guards. When Jora'h rebukes him for using shiing, Thor'h defends his addiction.

On the water world, Jess Tamblyn learns that the wentals can construct another ship for him. After the new ship is completed, Jess returns to Rendezvous. There his return causes quite a sensation.

In Rendezvous, Cesca Peroni learns how Raven Kamarov's ship disappeared. Nikko Chan Tylar has brought back the ship remains with jazer streaked hull plates. The Roamers decide to cut off the Hansa's supply of ekti.

On Theroc, Celli discovers a mostly intact hydrogue warglobe for the EDF technicians to analyse. The damage to the trees, however, stretches further than she can see, even from Solimar's gliderbike. Later, Celli and Solimar learn that the Worldforest still enjoys their treedancing.

This novel still reads like something out of the Victorian era. Not only are the polities imperial, but the plot and dialogue are old-fashioned, like something by Rider Haggard. Maybe it goes with the territory.

Recommended for Anderson fans and for anyone else who enjoys grand adventures and wars between empires.

-Arthur W. Jordin
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting space opera but serious 'middle book' problems, October 5, 2004
The war against the hydrogues continues to go badly--only the Ildiran suicide-ramming attack has had any effect at all--and the duplicity of the Klikiss robots is gradually becoming apparent, but the Chairman of the Hansa decides that he must have a victory--and unite the human population. When the Roamers refuse to deliver essential fuel, he authorizes a series of attacks on them, planning on pressuring them into rejoining the Hansa majority.

The hydrogues appear to be winning the war, but ancient enemies, including the tree-forests of Theron, the powerful but chaotic star-dwelling faeros, and the strange conscious water-being, embedded in Jess Tamblyn, keep the hydrogues from spending more than token attention on humans and their humanoid allies, the Ildiran. Which is lucky for humanity--since both Ildiran and humans are launching their own civil wars.

Author Kevin J. Anderson jumps from character to character, describing the war, the lucky technology finds, and the slimy-types who use the moment of humanity's greatest danger to pursue their personal goals.

HORZION STORMS is the third in a huge series detailing the war, the multiple 'civilizations,' of the distant future, and the strange symbiotic relationships developing between human and Ildiran, human and water-creature, and human and tree. HORIZON does suffer from middle-book syndrome. There is a lot of setting up, a lot of angsting over choices, a lot of repeating what readers of earlier books already know, and not enough action and forward-moving plot.

Fans of the series will want to grab HORIZON STORMS. This probably is not the place to start reading the series--the story just doesn't make sense without the earlier books. Also, I suspect that missing this one wouldn't dramatically reduce the reader's enjoyment of the next story--not enough happens. Still, fans of Space Opera SF will enjoy this one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it!, June 7, 2014
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Good action and pace. Perfectly ties everything together while hinting at more mysteries to come. Plan on getting nothing done as you read this. Riveting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great space saga, May 17, 2014
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Love this series. As soon as I get close to finishing a book I immediately order next one on Amazon.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it, February 21, 2013
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To be honest I bought the hard copy of the 2 first books of the saga when I went to South Africa some years ago and had always been wanting to found out what had happened to the characters involved in the plot... When I got my Kindle I could finaly get the new books and had loved it up untill book 6...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A big story, September 15, 2005
By 
This review is from: Horizon Storms: The Saga of Seven Suns - Book #3 (Mass Market Paperback)
This a very big story. And a very exciting one. At times Anderson becomes a bit repetitive. Repeating things about situations and characters that you know already if you've read the books in order. This is a small flaw however. I Love the story itself and was hooked almost from the start.
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Horizon Storms: The Saga of Seven Suns - Book #3
Horizon Storms: The Saga of Seven Suns - Book #3 by Kevin J. Anderson (Mass Market Paperback - June 1, 2005)
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