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Horizon (The Sharing Knife, Book 4) Hardcover – Bargain Price, January 27, 2009


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager; 1 edition (January 27, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061375365
  • ASIN: B002SB8P4W
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (69 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,346,375 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“[Bujold’s] eventful conclusion to [The Sharing Knife] series proves that her talent for storytelling persists regardless of genre.” (Library Journal )

“As always, Bujold delivers us a world that is completely realized and populated with people, not characters . . . . The depth of both world and characters, even incidental ones, makes Horizon an engrossing, satisfying read and a fitting conclusion to the series.” (Anniston Star )

From the Back Cover

The concluding volumein the epic fantasy saga from multipleHugo Award-winning authorLois McMaster Bujold

A Lakewalker entrusted with protecting the populace from terrifying remnants of ancient magic, Dag Redwing Hickory never expected to fall in love with farmer girl Fawn Bluefield. When they joined in marriage, defying their kin, they bridged the perilous split between their peoples. Now Dag’s extraordinary maker abilities have grown—along with his fears about who and what he is becoming, and his frustration with the disdain in which Lakewalker soldier-sorcerers hold their farmer neighbors.

Fawn and Dag’s world is changing, and the traditional Lakewalker practices cannot continue to hold every malice at bay. At the end of their long journey home, the pair must answer the question they’ve grappled with for so long: When the old traditions fail disastrously, can their untried new ways stand against their world’s deadliest foe?

--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 72 people found the following review helpful By Mike Garrison on January 29, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
First off, this is the second half of the second story in a two story, four book series. So no, don't start here. The book does not (and is not intended to) act as a standalone novel. So from now on I'll assume the reader of this review has read the other three books.

I loved this whole extended story. And I'm glad to say, the final book does not disappoint. It neither wraps up all the problems of the whole world nor leaves a bunch of messy unfinished business. It continues the story of characters we've come to know and love, and it introduces still more of them (not always loveable). It also completes the "there and back again" story of Fawn and Dag's trip to the sea.

The main message of the book seems to be that when you can't see a way to solve your problems from where you are standing, sometimes it helps to stand in a different place. That's true geographically, and also metaphorically. Dag, who has been patroller and maker, healer and killer, Lakewalker with a Farmer wife, as well as boatman and camp dweller, ends up finally having a diverse enough viewpoint to start seeing the answers. But he can't do it alone.

The marriage of Fawn and Dag had been a shocking breach of the wall between Lakewalker and Farmer societies, up north. But in the south, where malices are few and Farmers are many, it seems the interactions between Farmer and Lakewalker are much more common. Dag rightly realizes that he is seeing the future of the north in the current south, and they haven't solved any of the problems he had spotted brewing back home. But at least the problems were more visible to other people, and that leads to a bit more support from them.
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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By L. Roth VINE VOICE on January 31, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The story of Farmer girl Fawn and Lakewalker Dag has been building through three books to this fourth, as the two of them continue their efforts to find a place in the world where they can live and have the family they want while also finding a way to deal with the crisis they see coming between their peoples and the ancient menace that threatens the whole world. This is not a stand-alone book; for those new to the series the preceding book Passage is a prerequisite at the minimum.

Warning - possible spoilers ahead.

The first two books, Beguilement and Legacy are much more focused on the relationship between Dag and Fawn. How they met, how they fell in love, and just what the two very different worlds they come from are like. Farmers and Lakewalkers do NOT ever marry each other - or so their two respective societies would have it.

Lakewalkers are set apart by their groundsense, an inherited ability to perceive the world in a different way that allows them to work what seems magic to Farmer eyes and fight an ancient foe. The enemy is Malices which emerge at random from the land and threaten to use their vastly more powerful groundsense to drain ground from the world until it all crumbles. Only Lakewalkers can resist the mind-enslaving, ground-ripping power of Malices. Farmers are little more than fodder for Malices - yet they fear and distrust the powers of their only protection, the Lakewalkers who ceaselessly patrol looking for the threat. Only Lakewalkers can kill Malices with their sharing knives, made from the bones of their own dead and primed by the death of a Lakewalker as his or her final gift in the centuries long war against their deadly foes.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By greenlady on January 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Horizon does a good job in wrapping up the "Sharing Knife" series. Readers should definitely not start with this volume - at minimum, you should read "Passage" first.

I found the Passage/Horizon pair a much more compelling read than Beguilement/Legacy. The first two books of the series are mainly focused on Dag and Fawn's relationship with each other, while the second pair is more how they interact with the world (and try to change it).

By necessity there are a few places where "Horizon" drags with exposition while the characters fill in the backstory of the other books, but there is also a great action sequence I hadn't anticipated - I thought that LMB had already explored all the possible types of encounters with the "malices" but I was wrong.

All the plot ends from Passages are wrapped up, in a way that is believable. While I prefer LMB's Vorkosigan and Chalion series, I still enjoyed Dag and Fawn's adventures and will still happily ready anything LMB's wants to write.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By David Roy on May 6, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I'm not sure what it is I like most about Lois McMaster Bujold's writing: her characterization skills, her prose, the fascinating world-building and plotting? Maybe it's all of the above. One skill she definitely has, though, is adaptability. In all four books of the "Sharing Knife" series, she has used a different style, even as she keeps everything consistent between the books. The fourth book, Horizon, fully illustrates that as Bujold adds a bit of action to the mix, with some wonderful magic, menacing forces, and the gradual softening of attitudes among the two very distinct societies that she has created. It's a wonderful culmination to a series that has captivated me from beginning to end, despite a couple of rough patches in the first book.

The first year of Dag and Fawn's marriage has been tumultuous, a honeymoon journey to show the Farmer girl a world that she's never seen. She's also learned a lot about how Dag's people, the Lakewalkers, aren't truly as scary as most farmers believe. Dag is learning more and more about becoming a "Maker," someone who specializes in working with the "Ground" that inhabits all human beings, and he harbors dreams of becoming a liaison between Lakewalker and Farmer, a bridge of understanding between the two peoples that will end the distrust that keeps them apart. As the newlyweds make their journey from the mouth of the river they have explored back home, with companions both Lakewalker and Farmer alike, the threat of a new kind of Malice (evil remnants of ancient magic) erupts in front of them. Old and tested ways may not be enough, and the true joining of Farmer and Lakewalker may be put to its ultimate test.
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