The Horse that Leaps Through Clouds and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $30.00
  • Save: $6.81 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by USMedia
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Readable copy. All pages complete and readable but expect worn edges, covers, and creases. Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction. There is no Amazon condition below acceptable.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Horse that Leaps Through Clouds: A Tale of Espionage, the Silk Road, and the Rise of Modern China Hardcover – April 26, 2011


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$23.19
$4.84 $0.24

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the China Books Store
Interested in browsing our full selection of books related to China? Visit our China Books Store.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Counterpoint; First Edition edition (April 26, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1582437343
  • ISBN-13: 978-1582437347
  • Product Dimensions: 1.7 x 6.7 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,502,715 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for The Horse that Leaps Through Clouds

"Tamm utilizes [Baron Gustaf] Mannerheim's extensive journals to effectively recreate sights and sounds across a vast landscape in an effort to better understand China's future by examining its past." —Publisher's Weekly

"[P]art-travelogue and part-biography with rigorous social historical analysis, [The Horse That Leaps Through Clouds] demands perseverance, and rewards it . . . Tamm offers as lucid an insight into China’s malaise as any foreigner could be expected to provide." —PopMatters.com

"A complicated, ambitious travel adventure through modern Inner Asia . . . a truly inspired journey." —Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

Eric Enno Tamm is an author and journalist. His first book, Beyond the Outer Shores: The Untold Odyssey of Ed Ricketts, the Pioneering Ecologist Who Inspired John Steinbeck and Joseph Campbell, was a Kiriyama Prize Notable Book. His writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Times Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle, and the Toronto Star, among others. Tamm currently lives in Ottawa.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Eric Enno Tamm is an author, journalist and analyst with more than 15 years' experience in the media and non-profit sector. His first book, "Beyond The Outer Shores: The Untold Story of Ed Ricketts, the Pioneering Ecologist Who Inspired John Steinbeck and Joseph Campbell," was a Kiriyama Prize Notable Book in 2005. His second book, "The Horse That Leaps Through Clouds: A Tale of Espionage, the Silk Road and the Rise of Modern China," is being released in the fall of 2010.

Eric has worked as executive director of the B.C. Coastal Community Network, communications director of Ecotrust Canada, and as a correspondent in Europe. His writing has appeared in Wallpaper*, The Globe and Mail, Los Angeles Times Magazine, Canadian Geographic, San Francisco Chronicle, Toronto Star, among others.

Born in Tofino B.C., Eric developed his interest in history and current affairs at a young age. His father, an Estonian refugee, would often recount gripping first-hand accounts of the Soviet invasion of the Baltic States during the Second World War. At the age of 15, Eric became the editorial cartoonist for the local newspaper, and went on to earn a master's degree in journalism from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and a master's degree in European affairs from Lund University in Sweden. Eric remained in Sweden for three years, working as the Nordic Contributing Editor for Wallpaper* magazine.

While study in Lund, a Finnish friend told him about Gustaf Mannerheim's epic trek from St. Petersburg to Peking in 1906. Several years later, and back in Vancouver, Eric read Mannerheim's travel journal and was mesmerized by its piercing insights and the striking parallels between the country's modernization in the late Qing Dynasty and Communist China today. He began intensive historical research and logistical planning to retrace Mannerheim's route on the centennial in 2006.

However, before he departed his home in Vancouver, the Chinese consulate, through its network of spies and informants, caught wind of his plans to venture into China's restive and rugged borderlands. He was repeatedly denied a visa. Like Mannerheim, he devised a cover and snuck into China's back of beyond.

The Horse That Leaps Through Clouds chronicles two epic journeys along the Silk Road--past and present--that offer a cautionary tale about the breathtaking rise of modern China.

Eric currently lives and works in Ottawa, Canada.

Visit Eric's personal website at www.ericennotamm.com.
visit "Beyond The Outer Shores" website at www.beyondtheoutershores.com
Visit "The Horse that Leaps Through Clouds" website at www.horsethatleaps.com

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
1
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 9 customer reviews
In my mind, Eric Enno Tamm's book ought to be at or near the top of everyone's reading list.
Gerald M. Henkel
An intriguing travelogue with a good measure of local history and early 20th European politics thrown in.
The Lorax
Tamms erudite and relaxed writing style makes this a relaxing, but at the same time informative read.
Anthony McEvoy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By R. M. Peterson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 10, 2011
Format: Hardcover
"The horse that leaps through clouds" was Baron Carl Gustaf Mannerheim - one of those people from several generations ago who seemed to lead enough lives and have enough adventures for about ten people of today. He is perhaps THE national hero of Finland. In 1918, Mannerheim led the military forces of the "Whites" in their defeat of Bolshevik armies, thereby securing the liberation and independence of Finland. In 1939, he again assumed command of the Finnish military in its defense against much superior Soviet forces, thwarting the Soviet Union in its campaign to make Finland an occupied satellite. Yet, before the World Wars Mannerheim had been an officer in the Imperial Army of Tsar Nicholas II and, seemingly, a devoted supporter of the Tsar, even when the Tsar was repressing his fellow Finns.

This book was inspired by one of Mannerheim's exploits on behalf of Nicholas II - a two-year espionage mission into Central Asia and China. From 1906 to 1908, Mannerheim, nominally traveling as a Finn collecting archaeological and ethnographic materials for a museum in Helsinki, traversed the remote autonomous areas of Central Asia and on into China, gathering economic, political, and military information for the Tsar. Along the way, in Kashgar, he was given a Chinese passport with a Chinese name - Ma Dahan, which Mannerheim, with both romantic and literary license, translated as "the horse that leaps through clouds".

Author Eric Enno Tamm determined to retrace Mannerheim's journey one century later. THE HORSE THAT LEAPS THROUGH CLOUDS is Tamm's account of both his trek and Mannerheim's. Tamm interweaves the two accounts deftly. Nonetheless, it is Tamm's travels in the latter half of 2006 that constitute the principal reason to read this book.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Luv2Learn on June 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Apart from the many parallels between the the treks of 1906 and 2006, I was enthralled by the journey across the southern tier of the former USSR and the journey into China. After reading each chapter, I 'flew' by Google Earth to the locations and opened photos and Youtube sources that showed me the people and geography. The concluding chapters left me wondering about and discussing with friends the issues regarding the final days of the Qing Dynasty and the challenges facing the Chinese Communist Party today. You will not be disappointed with the travel and political observations from the treks.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gerald M. Henkel on January 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover
In my mind, Eric Enno Tamm's book ought to be at or near the top of everyone's reading list.
It will have special appeal to those of us who have Finnish ancestry because it is about the notable Finn Baron Gustaf Mannerheim, and his espionage expedition (as a Russian spy) from St. Petersburg all the way to Beijing, China, in 1906-08. The title is taken from Mannerheim's Chinese name, Ma Dahan, meaning "the horse that leaps through clouds."
In 2006, Tamm retraces Mannerheim's epic journey across the Silk Road from St. Petersburg to Beijing, and as Tamm has written, "[I] discovered both seismic differences and eerie similarities between the China of today and the country Mannerheim visited a century ago."
Yet, the book is far from being nostalgia for Finns. This is an adventure tale that has the feel of a novel that any reader can enjoy. But even more so, because Tamm is a very knowledgeable historian and critical observer, it is a book that ultimately reminds us of both the immense political and environmental changes that have taken place on this planet in the last 100 years, and at the same time reminds us of all the corrupt political power-tripping that has remained unchanged in that period of time.
Here's a case in point: Tamm, while preparing for his journey following Mannerheim's footsteps across Asia, visited with Craig Murray who was formerly a British ambassador to Uzbekistan. They discussed Murray's involvement in discovering torture practices benefitting both the US and Britain, and they talked about the idea that American involvement in Central Asia was "only about fighting militant Islam."
"The fundamental motives are more basic than that," Murray told me. "It's about oil and gas contracts." That, according to Murray, is the prize in the New Great Game.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brett Schneider on May 3, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Never before has a book left me so wishing I were Finnish. In "The Horse That Leaps Through Clouds", Eric Enno Tamm puts the best of Ian Fleming to shame as he retraces -- both on the page and in person -- Finnish phenomenon, Baron Gustaf Mannerheim's 20th Century trek along China's infamous Silk Road. I would heartily recommend Eric Tamm's latest to anyone interested in history, travel and China. And in this day and age, who among us wouldn't benefit from a broader knowledge of China: past, present and future? In brief, the T.H.T.L.T.C. is one hell of a ride.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed learning about parts of the world I rarely think about and many of the parallels between early 20th century history & the present day (e.g., the competition for central Asia, Qin dynasty v. present Chinese rule) and some of the history of China. However, perhaps like the Mannerheim's original work, I found the author's travelogue to be somewhat dry and impersonal. Occasionally the author will mention tiredness or sickness but rarely any elation or disappointment which makes the work difficult to relate to ("which with to relate" if you prefer). A well researched and interesting book nonetheless.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?