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Hosting the Stranger: Between Religions Paperback – March 10, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-1441158086 ISBN-10: 1441158081 Edition: 1st

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Hosting the Stranger: Between Religions + Phenomenologies of the Stranger: Between Hostility and Hospitality (Perspectives in Continental Philosophy (Paperback Unnumbered))
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Hosting the Stranger is an exciting contribution to a new generation of inter-religious dialogue and scholarship — harmonizing an explicit hopefulness for hospitality within and between religions with an insistent respect for differing understandings of what constitutes hospitality. The book presses the urgency of the need for inter-religious hospitality without ignoring the risk entailed in 'welcoming the stranger'. It is a wonderfully balanced collection of essays bringing together theoretical and methodological investigations with a number of concrete discussions of the sources, understandings, and examples of hospitality in five different religious traditions.Accessible, yet historically attuned and theoretically nuanced, this collection of essays on hospitality in religion is an indispensable resource for students of religious studies as well as religious practitioners engaged in inter-religious dialogue."— Tamsin Jones, Lecturer on Religion, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Harvard University, USA

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 This is an important, open-hearted and useful collection of essays on the subject of hospitality, which often takes language as the first sign of its difficulty. The ghosts of Ricoeur and Derrida haunt the first half of the volume, and then it opens into Jewish, Christian, Buddhist, Islamic and Hindu perspectives on the subject of welcome in which God is the long-awaited guest. Almost any one of these essays could be read by students in a number of disciplines; the volume opens doors to discussions about translation and uprootedness, liturgies and history. They are written with great clarity and ease by people who know their subject and want to share it. It is, as its title suggests, a cheering book.
-Fanny Howe, Chair, Lannan Center for Poetics and Social Practice, GeorgetownUniversity



Hosting the Stranger is an exciting contribution to a new generation of inter-religious dialogue and scholarship – harmonizing an explicit hopefulness for hospitality within and between religions with an insistent respect for differing understandings of what constitutes hospitality. The book presses the urgency of the need for inter-religious hospitality without ignoring the risk entailed in 'welcoming the stranger’. It is a wonderfully balanced collection of essays bringing together theoretical and methodological investigations with a number of concrete discussions of the sources, understandings, and examples of hospitality in five different religious traditions.Accessible, yet historically attuned and theoretically nuanced, this collection of essays on hospitality in religion is an indispensable resource for students of religious studies as well as religious practitioners engaged in inter-religious dialogue.”— Tamsin Jones, Lecturer on Religion, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Harvard University, USA

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 This is an important, open-hearted and useful collection of essays on the subject of hospitality, which often takes language as the first sign of its difficulty.  The ghosts of Ricoeur and Derrida haunt the first half of the volume, and then it opens into Jewish, Christian, Buddhist, Islamic and Hindu perspectives on the subject of welcome in which God is the long-awaited guest.  Almost any one of these essays could be read by students in a number of disciplines; the volume opens doors to discussions about translation and uprootedness, liturgies and history.  They are written with great clarity and ease by people who know their subject and want to share it. It is, as its title suggests, a cheering book.
-Fanny Howe, Chair, Lannan Center for Poetics and Social Practice, GeorgetownUniversity

About the Author

Richard Kearney holds the Charles B. Seelig Chair of Philosophy at Boston College and has served as a Visiting Professor at University College Dublin, the University of Paris (Sorbonne) and the University of Nice. He is the author of over 20 books on European philosophy and literature and has edited or co-edited 14 more. He was formerly a member of the Arts Council of Ireland, the Higher Education Authority of Ireland and chairman of the Irish School of Film at University College Dublin. As a public intellectual in Ireland, he was involved in drafting a number of proposals for a Northern Irish peace agreement (1983, 1993, 1995) and in speechwriting for the Irish President, Mary Robinson. He has presented five series on culture and philosophy for Irish and/or British television and broadcast extensively on the European media. His most recent work in philosophy comprises a trilogy entitled 'Philosophy at the Limit'. The three volumes are On Stories (Routledge, 2002), The God Who May Be (Indiana UP, 2001) and Strangers, Gods, and Monsters (Routledge, 2003). James Taylor is a teaching fellow in the Philosophy Department at Boston College, USA. His main areas of expertise are Ricoeur, Foucault, Heidegger and Gadamer.

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