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Hot House Flowers Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 26 pages
  • Publisher: BookSurge Publishing (October 24, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1419643797
  • ISBN-13: 978-1419643798
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 8.2 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,806,505 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Elected in 2004 in Bronx County, New York, John H. Wilson currently serves as a Judge in the Criminal Court of Brooklyn, NY. Previously the Law Chairman of the Bronx County Conservative Party, Judge Wilson was born in the Bronx and graduated from Pace University School of Law. In the late 1980's Wilson served as an Assistant District Attorney in Bronx County. He currently resides in New York.

Customer Reviews

I cannot believe that people would expose children to it.
Amazon Customer
A weed or dandelion is no lesser a plant than a flower such as a rose.
B. Gomez
It's very difficult for me to give this book merely one star.
Gen. JC Christian, patriot

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

211 of 232 people found the following review helpful By Gen. JC Christian, patriot on November 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
It's very difficult for me to give this book merely one star. After all, how can a true American patriot not love a children's story in which a "benevolent master" saves a hot house by rounding up undesirables and destroying them? Unfortunately, the list of undesirable plants the master eliminates is limited to simply dandelions. That's very disappointing.

Surely others could be added to that list. How about plants with minor defects? Why should the hot house's resources be shared with them? The same goes for gardenias. I think most of the other flowers would be offended by the fertilizer gardenias enjoy. And do I even have to mention the pansies?

Hopefully Judge Wilson will correct these oversights in future books.
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110 of 124 people found the following review helpful By Leon Littman on November 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
Despite my concerns about the illegal immigration and the price paid, particularly in smaller municipalities, for this problem, I think it is dangerous to say the least to send a message to children that the solution is to "weed out" illegal immigrants, though I have a hard time imagining young children understanding an allegory like this as being about defense of country. I also have a hard time understanding what any of this has to do with defense of country, since the 9/11 hijackers were here legally, the Oklahoma City bombers were American, and there is no threat that I know of by Mexicans or other Latino immigrants, who represent the vast majority of illegal immigrants, to take over America. Were the book honest, it might have presented the dandelions as flowers from a place lacking in soil and water looking to share with those who have both in abundance and willing to take the cheap fertilizer and dirty water no one else wants in order to grow.

If a book like this is meant to appeal to Christian parents, I can only say that I was unaware that Jesus turned people away for lacking the proper papers.
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92 of 108 people found the following review helpful By Greg patriot on November 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
It's very difficult for me to give this book merely one star. After all, how can a true American patriot not love a children's story in which a "benevolent master" saves a hot house by rounding up undesirables and destroying them? Unfortunately, the list of undesirable plants the master eliminates is limited to simply dandelions. That's very disappointing.

Surely others could be added to that list. How about plants with minor defects? Why should the hot house's resources be shared with them? The same goes for gardenias. I think most of the other flowers would be offended by the fertilizer gardenias enjoy. And do I even have to mention the pansies?

Hopefully Judge Wilson will correct these oversights in future books.
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135 of 166 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Cohen on November 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
The best story of the dangers of out-of-town dandelions coming in and destroying the greenhouse with their Camaros, mosques, and ethnic cooking flavors.

You'll be flipping the pages until the climactic finale where the hot house flowers, who love the dandelions despite the different colors of their petals, burn a vitamin spike on the dandelions' front lawn. Highly recommended.

P.S. Also worth noting is the scene where one of the weeds tries to bust up a chiffarobe for a hot house flower, but ends up in hot water as a result!
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68 of 83 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Kinney on November 29, 2006
Format: Paperback
The analogy in this book is fatally flawed even on the surface. Observe:

Humans are all the same race; the same kind of flower. The different skin colors and body features would analogize to different petal colors of the same flower species, NOT different flower species alltogether.

The different human races would more properly analogize to different color roses (yellow, red, white, etc) rather than a mix of geraniums and dandelions. In this way, we can see that having a garden with many different colored roses is much prettier than a rose garden with only one color. Furthermore, different color roses dont starve or stunt off the others. Rather, they compliment each-other.

I imagine that Mr. Wilson would act like the Queen of Hearts in his own backyard, insisting that all his roses be red, and dishing out harsh penalties for those who would allow white roses in his garden. Would Mr. Wilson employ buckets of red paint or garden shears to attain the uniformity in rose color that he demands? Perhaps a combination of the two? But the Queen of Hearts was well known to be mad in Lewis Carroll's famous tale.

I dont want a garden where roses of different colors are forbidden. Even the most vibrant red rose petals will bore a person eventually if no other rose color is to be found in the garden.

Finally, we can examine the reason for Mr. Wilson's analogy error. Why does he equate different human races with wholly different species of plants, rather than correctly equating them with mere different variations of the same plant? Because, to Mr. Wilson, those humans who are different to him are not humans at all. To Mr. Wilson, the immigrant humans are sub-human, less than human, and not to be equated in value with his own kind. Mr.
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56 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Hauksdottir on November 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
Dandelions are wonderful!

They have a soft, gentle odor, are bright and cheery harbingers of spring, the young leaves are tasty in salads... and you can even make wine if you don't enjoy flowers. What would childhood be like if nobody could make a wish before releasing a magical drift of seeds?

The only problem with them is that they happily grow anywhere from a well-fertilized lawn to high granite peaks. The same flower which is ruthlessly pulled up in suburbia is protected in Yosemite.

If dandelions were expensive plants requiring equally expensive coddling, they would grace the finest gardens.

Some of our fussy terrarium plants are roadside weeds in Vietnam. The same geranium grown under glass in Michigan is hacked back by machete-wielding transit workers in San Diego. In fact, NO plant grows naturally under glass! They are all wild, somewhere. They are all weeds, somewhere. A learned author would know that.

A better story would have been about chance and luck (where the seed falls) combined with appreciation of the struggle for life (what the seed does with its opportunity). Any child could learn from that!
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