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Hot Mess: speculative fiction about climate change Paperback – April 4, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 84 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 4, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1475151926
  • ISBN-13: 978-1475151923
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,058,229 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Hot Mess is an excellent early effort at encouraging other adventurous writers to look at what humanity is facing and explore the options."
- Joe Follansbee, joefollansbee.com/2013/11/29/review-hot-mess/

From the Back Cover

Extended review by Mark from The Masquerade Crew:
"All of them stuck to the climate change theme very well. Two of the stories use the theme in a subtle way, and because these two stories--"She Says Goodbye Tomorrow" by Eric Sipple and "Mom. Mom. Mom. Mom. Mom." by Rachel Lynn Brody--are also written extremely well, they are my favorite, earning 5-stars each.

Of those two, though, I have to say that the star of the show is Eric Sipple's story. It's also the longest of the group, which isn't a bad thing whatsoever; it's actually a good thing. His story grabs you from the first sentence and through a series of shifting scenes doesn't let you go until the end. It's detailed but not too much so. The structure (though confusing at first) actually works quite well; however, I didn't see this fact until long after I finished it, which is another good thing, for he had me thinking about his story long after the last word.

I definitely recommend this anthology if you are concerned about the changing climate of our planet, and even if you aren't, I still recommend it."

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Masquerade Crew on April 15, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Mark's Review

Reviewing an anthology of short stories written by different authors is a difficult task, for one has to judge theme, writing style, technique, level of editing, and so forth. I came up with the 4-star rating based upon all those criteria. Judging stories individually would have brought a range of scores from 3 stars to 5 stars. A few of the stories did not interest me, or the writing technique bothered me somewhat. One story in particular needed another pass at editing (in my opinion).

However, I want to use the rest of this review to focus on the positive, for there are a lot of good things to say about these stories. For instance, all of them stuck to the climate change theme very well. Two of the stories use the theme in a subtle way, and because these two stories--"She Says Goodbye Tomorrow" by Eric Sipple and "Mom. Mom. Mom. Mom. Mom." by Rachel Lynn Brody--are also written extremely well, they are my favorite, earning 5-stars each (if I were reviewing them individually).

Of those two, though, I have to say that the star of the show is Eric Sipple's story. It's also the longest of the group, which isn't a bad thing whatsoever; it's actually a good thing. His story grabs you from the first sentence and through a series of shifting scenes doesn't let you go until the end. It's detailed but not too much so. The structure (though confusing at first) actually works quite well; however, I didn't see this fact until long after I finished it, which is another good thing, for he had me thinking about his story long after the last word.

I definitely recommend this anthology if you are concerned about the changing climate of our planet, and even if you aren't, I still recommend it. It's a good read that gets your mental gears turning.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By OnOneCondition on June 5, 2012
Format: Paperback
While these stories vary in style and tone in a way that may be surprising, the theme is well maintained throughout. It's not as if the subject matter hasn't been addressed before, but this collection fills a need. This is a great concept that is, for the most part, well realized.

Even if you're a climate skeptic, I have a challenge for you. Spring the small price for the kindle copy and support independent publishing. (I downloaded the free PC reader) Try reading the editors note at the end. Next, read the first story and then tell me you're not affected. Tell me that you can't imagine a modest shift in microclimates or the huge potential consequences for real people that comes with it. Then keep reading.

For skeptics and believers in science alike, that's what this book does. It puts a human face on an issue that can sometimes feel too large to grasp.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joe Follansbee on November 29, 2013
Format: Paperback
Over the history of literature, only a few dozen writers, mostly in science fiction, have posited an earth with a different climate than what we now know. A small subset of those writers–mostly novelists–are attempting to take the very real changes in earth’s climate as starting points for an exploration of the psychological, political and emotional landscape of a warmed planet. Hot Mess brings five writers together for a successful stab at tackling climate change in the short story. Not all of Hot Mess’ stories succeed in shedding light on how humans might adapt. But as an anthology, Hot Mess is an excellent early effort at encouraging other adventurous writers to look at what humanity is facing and explore the options.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Halevi Bloom on August 21, 2013
Format: Paperback
The editors are to be congratulated for putting together a very interesting cli fi (climate fiction) anthology of short stories. It's another wake up call and I hope it reaches a wide audience, in translation, too. Bravo.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nancy M. Griffis on July 7, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Author's disclaimer: I didn't get paid for this, but did receive a free copy of the anthology.

This is a collection of speculative short stories about climate change and its myriad - likely disastrous - results. Overall, it's an interesting collection of styles and genres from scifi to flash-forward to... actually, I'm not sure what genre to call a couple of them. heh. I think there's a high level of writing to be found here and these are all writers that should definitely be supported now and in future endeavors. I'm certainly going to check them all out.

I like this anthology's goal and I think they accomplished it. From it's Editor's Note at the end of the collection: "Our intention with Hot Mess: speculative fiction about climate change has been to look at the social, human dimensions of climate change: how families, individuals, cities and more can be affected by sudden shifts in environment. We hope you've found the work thought-provoking."

Individually, I found some of the stories better than others and I suppose that's only to be expected. Here's a brief review of each in the order they're placed in the collection. I'm trying not to do any spoilers because if you say too much about a short, you basically give everything away.

"She Says Goodbye Tomorrow"
Eric Sipple
Honestly? I was so damn confused with this short that I had a difficult time figuring out the plot. There were flashbacks within flashbacks (or maybe just switching between events in the woman's life but not noting the dates, I have no idea) and that just didn't work for me. It wasn't until the end of story that I understand what was really going on. The language itself was rich and descriptive, but I had a hard time accessing the main character.
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