Hot Space [2 CD Deluxe Edition]
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:$14.88+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Queen's eleventh album (twelfth overall) entitled Hot Space was released in May of 1982.
After the success of the 1980 chart-topper The Game, Queen took some time following their 1980/81 tour to record a new album.
Lead singer Freddie Mercury, bass player John Deacon, guitarist Brian May and drummer Roger Taylor along with Game co-producer and engineer Mack went into the studio at the end of 1981 and recorded The Game's proper follow-up not counting the Flash Gordon soundtrack and Greatest Hits album.
When fans first put on Hot Space, they were expecting a typical Queen album but a good portion (the first side of the original vinyl and cassette issues at least) was dance music pure and simple.
The opening track "Staying Power" is a funky Mercury composition which may be seen as bad stale disco as disco was two years out of date by then but when performed live, the song was transformed into a full throttled rocker. Next is Brian's rocker "Dancer" which combined synth and regular drums and a synth-bass skin to Foreigner's Juke Box Hero and a killer May riff and superb May guitar solos. Next was John's funk number "Back Chat" which is my favorite song on the album's first half and would be a concert staple which was transformed into a scorching rocker live. Next was the Mercury composition "Body Language" which was the album's biggest hit in the US hitting #11 and had its video banned from MTV for being too risque (I think it was a great clip and was tame compared to lousy, filth-drenched videos that hacks like Madonna, Britney, Christina, Beyonce, The Pussycat Dolls, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga and Rihanna and such made). Roger's New Wave sounding rocker "Action This Day" ended the first half and was a great song but would be better live.
The album's second half was typical Queen tracks starting with Brian's rocker "Put Out the Fire" which is a great number. Freddie's ballad written for John Lennon, the Beatle-esque "Life is Real" follows and is a great song. Roger follows with the minor US hit "Calling All Girls" which is a great song though many hate it. We follow with Brian's UK Top 30 ballad "Las Palabras De Amor (The Words of Love)" which is a beautiful song and my favorite on the album's second side. Next is the Mercury/Deacon composed ballad entitled "Cool Cat" which Freddie sang entirely in falsetto and had John on guitars, bass guitar and drum machine (no Roger nor Brian on this track). We end with the classic duet with David Bowie called "Under Pressure" which hit #27 in the US and #1 in the UK and was a great song which first appeared on the band's US and Canadian versions of Queen's Greatest Hits album in November of 1981.
However, many fans (or poseur fans I call them) hated Hot Space's sound change and Hot Space peaked at a dismal #27 in the US and stalled at Gold which was a MAJOR FLOP compared to The Game's four million in US sales and #1 US peak.
Sales notwithstanding, this album is a great album and the band had a right to change its sound and experiment (that is why legendary bands like The Beatles, Pink Floyd, Rush, Genesis, Queen and Iron Maiden succeeded with changing styles and sounds over the years). If they had stuck with the AC/DC and Judas Priest formulas (not there is anything wrong with either band), they would have become stale!
In September of 2011, Queen re-released this underrated and underappreciated album as well as the other four studio albums from 1977 to 1982 (News Of The World, Jazz, The Game and Flash Gordon Soundtrack) as all newly remastered 2-CD Deluxe Editions painstakingly remastered by Bob Ludwig (who did a remaster of A Night at the Opera for its 30th Anniversary in 2005) for most of the world (the worldwide re-releases already occured in June) and these new remasters buries any previous CD version of the back catalog (including the flat 1980s EMI issue and 1991 remaster and 1994 EMI remasters).
The bonus CD for Hot Space contains the 1982 Milton Keynes performance of "Staying Power" which is great performance. Then you get the album outtake "Soul Brother" which is a band composition and was the B-side to "Under Pressure" with Freddie singing falsetto on the whole track. Next is the single remix of "Back Chat" (which had not ever been released in the States to my knowledge). Next is a rip roaring live readiong of "Action This Day" performed in Japan in November of 1982. Then you get a live recording of "Calling All Girls" which was also recorded in Japan in November of 1982. The booklet that comes with this has just about everything that came with the original LP artwork, lyrics and credits plus extra photos of the band.
Some will say why buy again but I say go for it because of the remastering!
Recommended!
33 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on April 19, 2013
Or, more specifically, maybe not as bad as I remember. Honestly, I just thought of this as just another stylistic change for a band that changed styles/genres every album. This is Queen's disco album. The Game and The Works are their New Wave albums. And so on. Yes, the '70s stuff was the peak, but every Queen album holds a few gems. Even this one.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on January 12, 2012
This is generally regarded as being Queen's least loved album. That's somewhat understandable, given that they abandoned their most cherished hallmarks for this release; the lush, grandiose vocal and guitar harmonies on which the band built their reputation are conspicuously absent.

Nevertheless, if Hot Space is judged on its own merits rather than against notions of what constitutes a 'typical' Queen album, then it holds up very well indeed. John Deacon's bass playing is particularly memorable on this album, while Freddie's vocal performances are as good as ever. Although Brian May's guitar playing is somewhat low-key compared to earlier glories, he still lets rip with some ferocious solos on several songs. And the quality of the songs on offer is excellent.

One trademark of Queen's that is definitely present on this album is the diversity of the material. There is disco/funk (Staying Power, Back Chat, Body Language), soul (Cool Cat, Soul Brother), hard rock (Dancer, Put Out the Fire), ballads (Las Palabras de Amor, Life is Real) and of course the magnificent 'Under Pressure', recorded with David Bowie. The bonus EP is a welcome addition, although I've only listened to the first two songs so far.

A final thought to leave you with - in my opinion this is Queen's least impressive album after 'Made in Heaven' and 'Jazz' (I'm not counting Flash Gordon and I've not heard their studio album with Paul Rogers, neither do I want to), but I still love Hot Space and feel it worthy of four stars. Even Queen's lesser albums are gems, and that's the measure of how fine a band they were.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 3, 2013
I won't review the songs, except for the B-side song " Soul Brother " great song to listen to, but listening closer it gets kinda "tongue in cheek". Just listen to it, I won't ruin the surprise here. And to be honest, I learned to appreciate this album only 20 yrs ago.

Quickly to the bottomline, my opinion is that this one has been properly remastered. I have the 1994 remaster aswell. Bass sounds more analogue and warm. Hightones are fresh without getting sharp, as for the "loudness war " ; Volume is tweaked up just a little, but not as high as some. Anyway, I would appreciate a comment on this as I learned that other reviews about the other albums concerning the remastering don't make me want to buy them. But if they are of the same quality as this remaster, I would consider it after all. So please comment on my review. Thanks

p.s. I have the Quad 34 Amp. with Syltech interlinks connections to a Rega Planet CD player. Legend II monitors by Philips connected with van den Hull cables. ( I know it's old stuff but I'm pleased with the sound )
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 26, 2013
I was sort of hesitate to order this album since I had been reading many negative review about Hot Space. It was a present surprise to listen to all the songs on this album. They are different from any other Queen albums, and none of Queen albums are same as other. I love to listen to Queen getting into the new territory. At the time when this album was newly released, it might have been difficult to understand the relevance of the album. This album represents Queen's never ending self invention.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on October 17, 2014
As a classic rocker, I can see why Queen fans detested this album when it came out. Gone are the long compositions full of rich Red Special solos, and instead synths combined with a funk sound. But honestly, listening to this thing fully, it's one of my favorite albums. Dancer, Cool Cat, Calling all Girls, Back Chat and Action this Day are great songs, I feel. Because right at the core, these 4 guys were very talented musicians and their compositions were fantastic. Of course, Under Pressure is also on here, and what can one say that hasn't been said already? While it's no "queen II/night at the opera/sheer heart attack", it's one of my favorites and i really enjoy the sound of it, despite it having a really distinct 80's sound to it, and not every song being a "classic". Cool Cat is my favorite song from this album and one of my favorite Queen songs - can't go wrong with John Deacon.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 17, 2013
got it for my son who is really getting into Queen; not on of my favorites, but my son (14) really seemed to enjoy it
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on April 28, 2015
sorry, and oh how i loved this band...but if you were there when this album was released, it seemed almost like a betrayal. it was flimsy and seemed half-hearted at best, but to me it was woeful. no amount of revisionist history can change my mind. i loved every record they had made up to this point, and they did manage to make some more great music...but, other than the instrumental aspects of "put out the fire", there isn't anything here for the fan of queen, the mighty rock band that had been. the deluxe edition would then have to be the equivalent of polishing a t*rd.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on December 15, 2011
Being a diehard fan of Queen's 1973-1978 work, it is always difficult for me to assess 1980's Queen albums.
The fact is that 80's and beyond albums such as The Game (1980) Flash (1981), , The Works (1984) and A Kind of Magic (1986) , do have some really great songs on them , but they also have a lot of mediocre and flat stuff , unlike the 70's albums which where absolute works of art complete in themselves.

Hot Space is the best Queen album of the 1980's but a far cry from the glorious rock opera/hard rock of the 1970-1976 period.

There was the transitional period of News of the World (1977), Jazz (1978) and The Game (1980), before the launch into disco music with Hot Space.

If you are a fan of 70's Queen thi9s takes some getting used to, but I have changed my mind about the album after a few more listens and decides it really rocks.

In this album, there are some really good songs:

Life Is Real: a beautiful piece dedicated to John Lennon, who had died less than 2 years before. The words of this song are poetic and do justice to the best of Queen.

Las Palabras de Amor (The Words of Love): This is the stuff Queen should have carried on doing, although the fashions at the time justified their move to the funky disco music, on most of this album. Queen's fantastic collaboration with David Bowie: Under Pressure - A great all-time classic.

There is the bluesy Cool Cat, the raunchy Body Language, the sexy Dancer

Staying Power, Calling All Girls, with it's high energy synthesis, have good lyrics and a nice beat.

Action This Day is full of energy and vigour, and then there is the sassy Backchat.

This is a good album, real good disco music, event though in my case, I love Queen's rock opera 70's music best.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on June 26, 2014
all good 100%
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Jazz
Jazz by Queen (Audio CD - 1994)

News Of The World
News Of The World by Queen (Audio CD - 1994)

Innuendo [Vinyl]
Innuendo [Vinyl] by Queen (Vinyl - 2009)
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.