Customer Reviews


5 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing!
I cried from beginning to end. This incredible movie makes you feel as if you are actually in the middle of the violence. You are absolutely terrified and helpless the entire time, and your heart absolutely shatters into a million pieces as you watch the injustice of genocide made very real and very personal. This movie will change your life.
Published on March 15, 2005 by Mackenzie

versus
8 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Paul missed something significant.
I recently watched "Hotel Rwanda" on DVD. Next, I got a copy of the book. It's a powerful true-life story, but it lacks something. For one thing, it lacks what one Amazon reviewer described as a comprehension of what would "make people go out and massacre their neighbors with machetes." There's a powerful presence of evil in this true-life story, an evil that inspired...
Published on May 6, 2005 by Maurice A. Williams


Most Helpful First | Newest First

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing!, March 15, 2005
This review is from: Hotel Rwanda: Bringing The True Story Of An African Hero To Film (Paperback)
I cried from beginning to end. This incredible movie makes you feel as if you are actually in the middle of the violence. You are absolutely terrified and helpless the entire time, and your heart absolutely shatters into a million pieces as you watch the injustice of genocide made very real and very personal. This movie will change your life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The companion book to a very powerful movie, April 6, 2005
By 
Jill Malter (jillmalter@aol.com) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hotel Rwanda: Bringing The True Story Of An African Hero To Film (Paperback)
"Hotel Rwanda" is a great movie. It tells us plenty about what happened in Rwanda in 1994, a year in which ten percent of the nation's population died, including most of the minority Tutsi population. Most were slaughtered by the majority Hutus, with machetes.

This book has an appendix that includes the entire screenplay of the movie. And it has a very interesting transcript of a PBS show about the genocide called "The Triumph of Evil." In addition, it discusses the making of the movie.

I've never been in Rwanda, so let me say what questions I had that I hoped this book (and the movie) might shed some light on:

1) Fear. I think the movie is excellent at showing the constant fear on the part of the Tutsis. But what about the killers? Were they scared? I couldn't tell. It was awfully difficult for me to comprehend what would make people go out and massacre their neighbors with machetes.

2) Betrayal. The movie does explain that it would have taken relatively little effort for outside troops to stop the slaughter. And it shows some of the politics that appear to have prevented this. But betrayal was not only by the United Nations, France, and a variety of other Western nations. There was also betrayal by the Catholic church, given that most of the killers and most of the victims were Catholics. We don't see much of that. But the book tells us that many Tutsis tried to seek refuge in the churches only to be killed in them.

3) Ugliness. I was curious about appearances in such times. Some folks say that people who are perceived to be ugly, grubby, impoverished, or disheveled are easier to see as dehumanized, putting them at greater risk in slaughters. And we see a hint of this in the movie, when Paul Rusesabagina says "this is not a refugee camp. The Interahamwe believe that the Mille Collines is a four star Sabena hotel. That is the only thing that is keeping us alive."

I agree that the question of just which people were allowed into the Mille Collines is interesting. It was a matter of life and death for most of them. But I don't think this is critical to the story.

One last point. The book makes it clear that one of the biggest differences between the movie and real life is the blood. Considering that hundreds of thousands of people were killed with machetes, I can believe that. And I'm glad that the movie left out some of the realism here.

I know that many people will be suspicious of a book and movie about such a political issue. But this movie and book got me to look more deeply into the history of what did happen in Rwanda. I think it is worth recommending on that basis alone.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Over 70 photos and movie stills capture the film's history, April 9, 2005
This review is from: Hotel Rwanda: Bringing The True Story Of An African Hero To Film (Paperback)
In 1994 as his country was experiencing insanity, hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina used wits and courage to save over a thousand people from certain death. His life story was captured in the film "Hotel Rwanda", and this movie companion, Hotel Rwanda: Bringing The True Story Of An African Hero To Film, documents the film's story, providing first-person pieces by Terry George and co-writer Keir Pearson from their struggle to gain financing and produce the film. Over 70 photos and movie stills capture the film's history, production challenges, and drama.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Paul missed something significant., May 6, 2005
This review is from: Hotel Rwanda: Bringing The True Story Of An African Hero To Film (Paperback)
I recently watched "Hotel Rwanda" on DVD. Next, I got a copy of the book. It's a powerful true-life story, but it lacks something. For one thing, it lacks what one Amazon reviewer described as a comprehension of what would "make people go out and massacre their neighbors with machetes." There's a powerful presence of evil in this true-life story, an evil that inspired hundreds of thousands of people to murder hundreds of thousands of men, women, and children. Surely, it would take more than radio messages of a madman to incite so many people to commit so many murders.

I had previously heard predictions of a massacre in Rwanda years before it happened. The mother of Christ was reported to have appeared to six girls and one boy in Rwanda starting in late 1983. In 1991, Ernest Rutaganda, one of the visionaries, was told through a vision that there would be a massacre of Tutsit and that President Habyarimana would be killed by his friends. This was two years before the event, but the other earlier predictions have been publicized ten years before the event.

I know the press is very skeptical of apparitions, but wouldn't you think that someone who lived through the massacre and wanted to tell the world about it would realize that mentioning the predictions would have added greater depth to the story? The predictions and their subsequent fulfillment would have alerted people of all races and all nations that these warnings (at Rwanda and similar warnings at Medjudgorje, Cuapa, Akiba, Fatima, Garabandal, and others-all available on the Internet) are meant for all of us. There is an evil presence in the world, a spiritual presence that is fully capable of influencing millions of people simultaneously.

In 1990, Ernest Rutaganda was imprisoned in Kigali for holding prayer meetings in his home. One wonders how Paul Rusesabagina, who lived and worked in the same city, would not have heard of these predictions. It can easily argued that these messages came from the God who created all of us, warning us that we must resist temptation or worse temptations would follow. If Paul Rusesabagina had mentioned them, his story would have captured the interest of all people. After all, even if the predictions had not been believed beforehand, they ultimately came true. Paul Rusesabagina was an eyewitness. He could have pointed out that it doesn't matter what race we belong to or what country we live in, we are all in this life together. We all face the same perils.

Instead, the movie politicized the abandonment of Rwanda on white/black racial issues. I think this was a big mistake, probably the main reason why the movie came out of the theaters so quickly. When the United Nations commander explained to Paul why the United Nations only evacuated Westerners, he told Paul, by way of explanation: "You're black! You're not even a nigger, You're African." This explanation didn't ring right in my ears. I'm sure the United Nations had other reasons for choosing as they did. I think the crisis in Rwanda was far more complicated than white prejudice against blacks.

I sympathize with the Amazon reviewer Marco from Kigali who lost his family in the massacre and was bitter toward Paul Rusesabagina. He has every right to be bitter because the loss of a family is a terrible tragedy. If Marco can believe that there is only one God over all of us, he could take comfort knowing that his loved ones suffered just like Jesus did: at the hands of sinners. They suffered for exactly the same reason that Jesus did: that sinners might have time to realize what they are doing and repent. His family's martyrdom makes them special to God. They suffered with Christ so that God need not immediately punish people intent on sinning before they can inflict suffering on someone else. If God were to immediately punish everyone intent on sinning, none of us would have a chance to reflect and repent (and find salvation). No one has greater honor with God than the victims of other person's sins, which honor lasts for all eternity.

I think Paul Rusesabagina did everything he could to save as many people as possible without risking those he already harbored. Paul should be commended for what he did when so many other people let themselves be incited to murder. But when Paul wrote about the horrors of the massacre, he could have touched more people if he mentioned the predictions. His book might have answered deeper questions, had a wider audience, and put a more understandable perspective on the massacre.

Reference: Ernest Rutaganda, Google search "Rwanda Blessed Virgin."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 40 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Rubbish, February 20, 2005
This review is from: Hotel Rwanda: Bringing The True Story Of An African Hero To Film (Paperback)
I don't know which category to put this book/movie into.

It certainly does not reflect a really life story and has little fiction character.

It does nothing to justify the genocide all it does is forming endless monologue of blame mainly to the West.

Koffi A is not a westerner and nothing is said about him.

As a survivor of 94 I find it insulting to me and the memory of my beloved late family.

Shame on Paul for even aggreeing to be portrayed in this light. it does definitely says why during that time only those who could afford it were allowed in the Hotel doors contrary to what is portrayed in the story. he definitely applied the rule "WERE ALL NOT EQUAL"

Absolute rubbish, good acting though
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Hotel Rwanda: Bringing The True Story Of An African Hero To Film
Hotel Rwanda: Bringing The True Story Of An African Hero To Film by Keir Pearson (Paperback - January 27, 2005)
$19.95 $16.43
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.