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Hotevilla (Tr) Paperback – March 1, 1996


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 578 pages
  • Publisher: Treasure Chest Books; First Edition edition (March 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1569248109
  • ISBN-13: 978-1569248102
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 8.5 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #236,147 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Evehema, a 105-year-old traditionalist from the village of Hotevilla, wants to share Hopi prophetic visions with the world. He has chosen Mails (The Pueblo Children of the Earth Mother, Doubleday, 1983) as his vehicle. The result is a polemic for the position of Hopi "traditionals" and against the "progressives" of the Hopi Tribal Council. This history of the Hopi people from their emergence into this world through 1994 concentrates on events subsequent to the infamous 1906 split at the village of Oraibi and the establishment of Hotevilla by the ousted traditionalists. While there are more even-handed discussions of these events (see Peter M. Whiteley's Deliberate Acts: Changing Hopi Culture Through the Oraibi Split, Univ. of Arizona, 1988), Mails does provide transcriptions of the hard-to-find Hotevilla newsletter, Techqua Ikachi (1975-86), which disseminated the traditionals' views to the world at large. Mails's books are known for their pen-and-ink drawings, but this one relies largely on poorly reproduced photographs. A disappointment.
Mary B. Davis, Huntington Free Lib., Bronx, N.Y.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 9, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book is not popular among those Hopi who are on the payroll of the US Government or helping the Peabody Coal Company or part of the BIA-created tribal council. But it does tell the story of those elders, particularly Dan (who died recently), who have an important message for the world. Highly recommended!
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Rafael Chicahua on April 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
The text under discussion is a profound critique of not only the activities of the BIA and the neo-colonialist Hopi Tribal Council but, in its essence, stands as a moving and formidable critique of Western civilization - one that illuminates the processes of cultural genocide that has been carried out against indigenous populations in the wake of their military conquest and occupation by a foreign power - and the deep resistance of traditional indigenous peoples to the processes of cultural genocide.
The elders who speak through the auspices of this work embody a profound political, moral, cultural and spiritual sophistication
that upholds the values concentrated in the name of their publication - Techqua Ikachi - Land and Life - Tierra y Vida.
What is most striking is the awareness the text creates of the inseparability of morality, culture, spiritual practice and political depth, and their rootedness in the Land, in the Earth, and in the relationship of peoples to the Earth. The most fundamental premise that is expressed in the text is its call to "blend with the land," and the text as a whole illuminates the meaning of a culture devoted to this principle in practice.
In so doing it stands as a striking counterpoint to the disintegrative powers of the culture of the capitalist colonial settler state that now occupies the land, and offers a sharp and abiding critique of the alienation and atomization inherent in the world view and cultural practices of the now-dominant European conqueror. From this standpoint the text is a classic treatment of resistance to the imposition of colonial rule and of the impact of colonial rule on the cultures of occupied and oppressed peoples.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By T. Lotzer on December 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover
A must for any one seriously interested in the Hopi people, their history and future. Highly recommended.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By pwdogs on October 30, 2007
Format: Paperback
I was disappointed with this book. I had read the Thomas Mails book on the Apache and was impressed with it. However, that was years ago! It appears that Mails has found a more lucrative market. In this book he panders to people who see Western Culture as the Great Destroyer. He is suppose to be talking about Hopi prophesies. In the book he says that any reasonable person will recognize that the Hopi are right and he encourages people to INVENT ceremonies! That is NOT the Hopi way! Hopi are traditional people and it is important to perform ceremonies in the right way and with the right attitude. Hopi go through extensive training starting at about the age of eight. I asked an elder one time how he felt about people trying to copy Hopi ceremonies & he said since they do not know the correct way to perform the traditional ceremonies, they do not accomplish anything positive. They do, however, drain away some of the power associated with the ceremony, making less available to Hopi elders. This is a dangerous situation as the Hopi are no longer able to keep the world in balance. Koyaniskatsi- World in Chaos!

The Tribal Council is not the traditional form of Hopi government, which is based on the matrilineal clan system. Each village is independent and within each village, each clan is independent. This worked well in pre-Spanish contact days. In the modern world it would make it difficult for the Hopi to have any control of their destiny. Therefore, although some villages still abstain from participating in the Tribal Council (they are not forced into it!), the Council has provided an interface between the Hopi and the Federal Government and have provided a voice to speak to the non-Hopi cultures for the Hopi people.

The Hopi have mixed emotions about the book. Some say it at least warns the Bahanas of the dangers to this world. Others are shocked by the way Mails presents their culture and beliefs and to NOT approve of this book.
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