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Hotwire Comix and Capers Vol. 1 Paperback – May 31, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 136 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics Books; 1 edition (May 31, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1560977280
  • ISBN-13: 978-1560977285
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #700,932 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

When was the last time you were truly shocked by a comic? Take a look at this collection and you could be. Editor and bad boy cartoonist Head has created an anthology that seeks to recapture the spirit of the underground comics movement. The stories range from the outrageous—like Head's own lurid, over-packed, ultra-violent noir pastiche "Mindless Thrills!"—to the surreal, like Max Anderson's wordless tale "Car Boy." Other tales are subtly melancholy—"Family Circus" by Carol Swain—or the just plain strange—a retelling of the story of Faust in the style of Jim Davis (R. Sikoryak's "Mephistofield"). The only thread connecting the divergent styles of storytelling and art is the unlikelihood that any of these stories would be published by the mainstream comics industry. Although the story approaches vary so greatly that readers might be confused, this collection manages to capture the anarchic outsider spirit of good subversive cartooning. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Editor Head explains that what sets this alternative-comics anthology apart is that it consists not of sophisticated, arty comics or sensitive autobiographical works but of comics with attitude. Indeed, the title of Head's over-the-top hard-boiled-gangster parody, "Mindless Thrills," could be that of the whole shebang, a showcase of the comics medium's in-your-face bad boys near the top of their form. The flavor of the flock is well exemplified by such willfully offensive entries as Johnny Ryan's "My Mother the Idiot," Doug Adams' "Hot Rod Hillbillies," and Rick Altergott's proudly gross Doofus story. Despite Head's disclaimer, many contributions do veer toward the arty, but even those possess a disquieting strangeness, and the fact that the best of them, Max Andersson's and Carol Swain's pieces, are among the most memorable in the book puts Head's attitude-based premise in question. As is his wont, R. Sikoryak steals the show with his retelling of Faust in the style of Garfield Needless to say, for adults only, and with caution even to them. Gordon Flagg
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By DE Burke on April 26, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wierd, odd and disturbing. Cool visuals. For fans of the twisted genre. Loved this book.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Eric on April 16, 2013
Format: Paperback
The sad truth is that the good stuff in this collection is far outweighed by the bulk of pointless contributions that make up this collection. The basic idea here seems to be inspired by the underground comics of the 1960s and alternative comics from the 1980s. Glenn Head is both the editor and the most prominently featured contributor to this collection, so it seems fitting to talk about his contributions first. Head's art and stories appear fun and energetic at first glance but fizzle quickly as his narratives have no direction and the humor is minimal. His art style is also very derivative of Crumb and Deitch, which might be a good thing if he had something entertaining to say. It's a lot of effort for such pointless stories. Similarly, the art of Tim Lane seems very Charles Burns-esque, enough that you can't help but make the comparison, but unlike Charles Burns, his noir-ish stories of life's seedy underbelly lack a compelling edge and leave you wondering what the story was supposed to be. Probably the worst in this collection would have to be Johnny Ryan's contributions. I've seen some of Ryan's Prison Pit comics which have a wacky edge to them, but these strips are worthless. I could name a dozen or so alternative comic book artists who do a similar type of thing as Mr. Ryan but are actually funny (Kaz's Underworld series would be my first recommendation). Sorry Johnny, but just because all these stories orbit around poo, dicks and dropping the F-bomb doesn't automatically make them funny.

The best of this collection are the more intelligent or witty pieces as compared to the mindlessly amoral for no reason kind of material. There are some really good pieces to be found here, but these pieces are in the minority. R.
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