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The Hound of the Baskervilles (Sherlock Holmes Vol. 5) Kindle Edition

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Length: 164 pages Word Wise: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

We owe 1902's The Hound of the Baskervilles to Arthur Conan Doyle's good friend Fletcher "Bobbles" Robinson, who took him to visit some scary English moors and prehistoric ruins, and told him marvelous local legends about escaped prisoners and a 17th-century aristocrat who fell afoul of the family dog. Doyle transmogrified the legend: generations ago, a hound of hell tore out the throat of devilish Hugo Baskerville on the moonlit moor. Poor, accursed Baskerville Hall now has another mysterious death: that of Sir Charles Baskerville. Could the culprit somehow be mixed up with secretive servant Barrymore, history-obsessed Dr. Frankland, butterfly-chasing Stapleton, or Selden, the Notting Hill murderer at large? Someone's been signaling with candles from the mansion's windows. Nor can supernatural forces be ruled out. Can Dr. Watson--left alone by Sherlock Holmes to sleuth in fear for much of the novel--save the next Baskerville, Sir Henry, from the hound's fangs?

Many Holmes fans prefer Doyle's complete short stories, but their clockwork logic doesn't match the author's boast about this novel: it's "a real Creeper!" What distinguishes this particular Hound is its fulfillment of Doyle's great debt to Edgar Allan Poe--it's full of ancient woe, low moans, a Grimpen Mire that sucks ponies to Dostoyevskian deaths, and locals digging up Neolithic skulls without next-of-kins' consent. "The longer one stays here the more does the spirit of the moor sink into one's soul," Watson realizes. "Rank reeds and lush, slimy water-plants sent an odour of decay ... while a false step plunged us more than once thigh-deep into the dark, quivering mire, which shook for yards in soft undulations around our feet ... it was as if some malignant hand was tugging us down into those obscene depths." Read on--but, reader, watch your step! --Tim Appelo

From School Library Journal

Grade 9 Up-In what is arguably both the best Sherlock Holmes story in the canon and one of the classic all-time mystery novels, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle parlays his interest in the occult with keen scientific detection in a story that prominently showcases Dr. Watson. Upon hearing Dr. James Mortimer's saga of the haunted Baskerville family and the recent death of family head Sir Charles Baskerville, apparently from the hound of the legend, Holmes and Watson begin their investigation. When the estate's heir, Sir Henry Baskerville, arrives in London from Canada strange things immediately occur and Holmes dispatches Watson to accompany Sir Henry to Baskerville Hall. Situated in Dartmoor in Devonshire, the estate borders a tremendous moor that includes Grimpen Mire, the deadly quicksand-like bog, and provides the Gothic atmosphere that so beautifully saturates the storyAthe oppressive manor and nightly sounds of a wailing woman, Neolithic ruins and monoliths throughout the moor, a mysterious butler and his agitated wife, an escaped killer at-large on the moor, and the spectral and murderous hound. This expurgated version is wonderfully conceived and executed in every aspect, but particularly in the dexterous delivery of veteran British actor, Tony Britton. His diverse and distinctive portrayal of over a dozen characters is singularly commanding. This literary masterwork that has found its simpatico audio incarnation should be an obligatory purchase for all audio collections.
Barry X. Miller, Austin Public Library, TX
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • File Size: 246 KB
  • Print Length: 164 pages
  • Publisher: Fair Price Classics (July 1, 2010)
  • Publication Date: July 1, 2010
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003XYE7R2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #235,358 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 69 people found the following review helpful By C. Gonzalez on February 28, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I concur with previous reviews. Unacceptable copy as it is mising passages - as mentioned before - which creates the most confusion from the very start. Should be removed from the Amazon catalog as it is unbecoming of this vendor. SAVE YOUR TIME. DO NOT DOWNLOAD IT.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Deborah Teitelbaum on December 25, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a classic mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Unfortunately, this free version lacks several sections vital to solving the mystery. I have only read a couple chapters and have already found that the legend of the Baskervilles, the account of the death of Sir Charles Baskerville and a letter to Sir Henry Baskerville are missing. These omissions render this version useless, and force me to delete it from my library.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Matthew French on August 17, 2005
Format: Paperback
When I began the book, I thought it would be slow going because it was written about 100 years ago. I was SO wrong! I finished the book in a period of less than 24 hours!!! This is an absolutely fabulous book! Doyle's use of language is masterful, and you are swept away to the moor with its swamps, jagged cliffs, and massive hills. I can honestly say I was quite spooked as I was reading some of it at night!

Since this is the first novel I have ever read by Doyle, I didn't know what to expect. But the twists in the plot and the constant itching to know what was going to happen next had me hooked!

I watched the 1959 movie after reading this, and I have to say it was a disgrace. I don't know if I would be happy seeing any of the versions, only because I don't know if any of them could even compare to the rich world and language used by Doyle to transport you to Devonshire!! But of course, the book is always better than the movie. :)
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Danielle G. on December 9, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As mentioned by the previous reviewer, this version is missing quite a bit of key content. Whether it's a formatting issue with the Kindle or the transcriber forgot to include the passages is unclear. But the story is unreadable without the missing text.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ksenia Anske on August 8, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What a mysterious quagmire, sinister and poetical at the same time. It's been years since I read a Sherlock Holmes book, and it was in Russian on top of it. Reading it in English again brought me back to the moor, to the fog, to the melancholy English countryside where a vicious criminal plotted a cold-blooded murder by means of evoking an old family legend and making it come to life. Arthur Conan Doyle unfolds it masterfully, without missing a single detail and dragging the reader deeper and deeper into a tangle of secrets, at the same time narrating in a relaxed conversational of a gentleman simply telling a story. And the story is worth telling.

Famous detective Sherlock Holmes is presented with a curious incident of old Sir Charles Baskerville dying tragically and unexpectedly, with no obvious signs of struggle, presumably, of a heart attack, leaving behind a considerable estate. Was it an accident? How did he really die? What if the legend is true? What if the hellhound, that supposedly is the Baskervilles' family curse and cause of death of every Baskerville, exists? Dr. Mortimer, a family friend, relays this story to Holmes and Watson, concerned for the well being of Sir Henry Baskerville, a new heir who is about to arrive from Canada to inherit the estate. And here the wild ride begins. What starts out as a simple string of coincidences and seemingly trivial and unrelated facts quickly escalates into a chilling chase, first in London, then at Baskerville Hall, and then comes to a spectacular and horrific climax out on a desolate Devonshire moor, complete with hellish howls in the boggy mist, savage prison convicts, strange tightlipped butlers, beautiful secretive women, and a slew of logical puzzles that are so characteristic of Doyle's work. I might just start rereading all Sherlock Holmes books again, this one was so good.
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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 19, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Baskerville family had a myth that haunted them for ages. When it finally comes true, Mr. Sherlock Holmes must come to the rescue. The Baskerville myth of a dog that kills all descendants of the Baskervilles at night on the moor has haunted the family for ages. So, when Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead on the moor, everyone assumes it was the hound. Sir Henry, who is Sir Charles' nephew, comes and inherits the estate with Holmes closely watching. Sir Henry meets the Stapletons, a young couple that are his closest neighbors, and begins to fall in love with Ms. Stapleton. Holmes puts Sir Henry's life at stake at the end of the book, and they catch the culprit in the act. This book is an excellent read that would be the perfect story to read when you can't decide between a mystery and an adventure.

This book is an example of how much Sherlock Holmes cares about other people's feelings. When Holmes sent Watson with Sir Henry to inherit the estate , he didn't tell Watson that he would follow to make sure everything was OK, which made Watson feel betrayed and not trusted. Holmes also told Watson that Cartwright had supplied all of his needs for him, which made Watson even more upset. At the end of this story, Holmes puts Sir Henry's life on the line when he lets the hound jump on Sir Henry before he kills it, petrifying Sir Henry with fear.

The antagonist is really good at disguising himself in this book. He outsmarts Sherlock Holmes in London with a full black beard, and calling himself Sherlock Homes. The Antagonist also befriends the Baskervilles so that they would never suspect him as the culprit. His plans are very smart, from bribing Sir Charles out of his house to attempting to kill Sir Henry the way back from a friendly dinner.
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