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Hounded (Iron Druid Chronicles) Mass Market Paperback – May 3, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: Iron Druid Chronicles (Book 1)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey (May 3, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345522478
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345522474
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (811 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,658 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Hearne, a self-professed comic-book nerd, has turned his love of awesome dudes whacking mightily at evil villains into a superb urban fantasy debut. Staying alive for 2,000 years takes a great deal of cunning, and sexy super-druid Atticus O'Sullivan, currently holed up in the Arizona desert, has vexed a few VIPs along the way. High up on that list is Aenghus Óg, the Celtic god of love. It's not just that Aenghus wants his sword back—though it is a very nice magical sword—but that Atticus didn't exactly ask permission to take it. Atticus and his trusty sidekick, Irish wolfhound Oberon, make an eminently readable daring duo as they dodge Aenghus's minions and thwart his schemes with plenty of quips and zap-pow-bang fighting." --Publisher's Weekly, starred review

“A page-turning and often laugh-out-loud funny caper through a mix of the modern and the mythic.”—Ari Marmell, author of The Warlord’s Legacy

“Celtic mythology and an ancient Druid with modern attitude mix it up in the Arizona desert in this witty new fantasy series.”—Kelly Meding, author of Three Days to Dead

“Kevin Hearne breathes new life into old myths, creating a world both eerily familiar and startlingly original.”—Nicole Peeler, author of Tempest Rising

About the Author

Kevin Hearne is a middle-aged nerd who still enjoys his comic books and old-school heavy metal. He cooks tasty omelets, hugs trees, and paints miniature army dudes. He lives with his wife, daughter, and doggies in a wee cottage.


More About the Author

Kevin Hearne is a middle-aged nerd who still enjoys his comic books and old-school heavy metal. He cooks tasty omelets, hugs trees, and paints miniature army dudes. He lives with his wife, daughter, and doggies in a wee cottage.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

270 of 282 people found the following review helpful By Mayfayre VINE VOICE on March 6, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I don't usually get overly effusive in my book reviews, but d*mn, this was a fun book! I'm an urban fantasy junkie and have logged a lot of reading hours in that genre, and with every writer and his/her brother jumping into the field to take advantage of its current popularity, I've thrown a lot of books at the wall because they're not worth the paper they are printed on. "Hounded" is definitely one of those books that you place down carefully, and remember where you stored it in your bookcase because you know that you'll be re-reading it sooner or later. It's definitely a keeper!

Quick synopsis: Atticus O'Sullivan is a 2100-year old Druid, supposedly the last of his kind. His appearance is that of a 21 year old, good-looking Irish guy. He lives in Tempe AZ, and runs a New Age-y herbal and book store. He's got an enemy who is the Celtic god of love who wants a mystical sword that Atticus took from him in a battle centuries ago, and who also wants Atticus dead. Periodically, as the god has located Atticus, he sends minions after him to kill him. In this story, he has located Atticus again, and decides to kill him personally.

The usual urban fantasy suspects exist: the Tuatha De Danann, werewolves, vampires, witches, ghouls, gods, goddesses, demons, etc., though they are not "out" to the general human population. So far, this doesn't sound like anything special, does it? The key differences between this book and most of the others in this genre is that it is extremely well-written (and even though I was reading the Advance Reader's Edition, it didn't have the spelling errors that are so common now in books), the characters are fleshed-out and interesting, and most of all, there is a sense of humor and fun in this book.
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56 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on April 2, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Two things made me crave this book in my hands before its release in late April/early May--first the protagonist, Atticus, sounds like my kind of guy. He's brash, he's sensible and he taunts gods and goddesses like their nothing more than playground bullies. His tactful, but not truly, reverent attitude towards those beings is part of his charm. The second is that the excerpts I've read have made me eager to read more. Normally excerpts from authors I don't know make me interested, but not eagerly anticipating. They tend to be too short so I don't get a good feel for the character.

Not so with Atticus!

Admittedly my other reason was I was eager to see how all the pantheons of deities interacted and most especially the Celtic lore. I was happily ready to read, spot a deity I only cursorily know, look them up and then go back. Hearne didn't make me need those encyclopedias though, he gives a very good accounting of these deities without having Atticus run around playing Exposition Man.

In truth I appreciated the fact that Atticus was neither too modern nor too archaic in his speech and mannerisms. He balanced the line well; he managed to adapt many of the customs he grew up with to modern day and picked up the speech patterns of the modern world well. He was practical where others expected him to be foolish (given his words) or reckless (given his actions). It never got tiring to see when it dawned on people that hey Atticus is a clever one.

On occasion descriptions got to be a bit tedious or redundant--Hearne doesn't need to tell us, every single time, what's going on with Atticus' tattoos. Or that he has to be barefoot to channel his power. I understood--Atticus is on land, thus he's barefoot'ed, thus he's very powerful.
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123 of 146 people found the following review helpful By Jana Stocks on July 7, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was excited for this book when I saw the initial story description and having finished it I find myself seeing it as a hit and miss kind of offering. There are some great ideas which I liked very much, but also some thing that made me cringe and want to slap the narrator and occasionally the author. :P

On a positive note I do like the pacing of the book and the wit. The widow McDunna was a complete crack up, and I like the use of the Irish mythos in a way that wasn't over done, even if it was a bit simplistic. The explanation of why Atticus is in Arizona and what he's chosen to do with his life makes sense to me, as does his desire to play keep away from a God that wants his head. The relationship with Oberon is good, though I do find some of the things Oberon says to be so far out of a dog's realm of understanding that it throws me out of the story. I think if there had been more information making Oberon a specific familiar with thoughts outside of doggie comprehension that it would have made better sense, but he's just a dog who has been affected by being around Atticus. For me that doesn't make the jump to understanding traumatized Toto or citrus air fresheners.

I do not like how Atticus thinks and acts like an oversexed frat boy. Sex doesn't bother me. Sex with at least two goddesses and being lusted after by others...well...kinda par for the course for the genre. Many of the heroes and heroines of UF are attractive to all sorts of folks, even if the hero/ine themselves are described as being plain or otherwise not overly attractive. So it's a little Gary Stu, but dealable with. I despise the interactions with the EMTs and the portrayal of the same.
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