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How to Be a Friend: A Guide to Making Friends and Keeping Them (Dino Life Guides for Families) Paperback – September 1, 2001


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How to Be a Friend: A Guide to Making Friends and Keeping Them (Dino Life Guides for Families) + Cool Down and Work Through Anger (Learning to Get Along®)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Series: Dino Life Guides for Families
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (September 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316111538
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316111539
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 8.6 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,432 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

"Spotlighting some unavoidable trouble spots, the Browns impart valuable tactics for coping with rejection, shyness, arguments, etc.," said PW. Ages 4-8.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3-Similar in style to the Browns' Dinosaurs Divorce (Atlantic Monthly, 1986), this picture book offers kids practical suggestions about resolving arguments, getting over being shy, handling bossy children and bullies, and more. The easy-to-read text contains many examples of how to be a friend, each paired with a picture of two or more dinosaurs in that particular situation. For example, "You can protect a friend if someone starts bothering him" is illustrated with a dinosaur saying, "Stop it! Leave him alone!" to a bully. Marc Brown's colorful, whimsical cartoons are integral to the appeal of the book. The front endpapers feature suggestions from a third-grade class on "Ways to Be a Friend" ("Be helpful," "Take turns," etc.) along with drawings of happy dinosaur faces, while at the back, "Ways Not to Be a Friend" ("Make mean faces," "Call them a name they don't like," etc.) are illustrated with grumpy faces. While there are many wonderful stories that deal with friendship, few give direct advice to children about what to do and what not to do. Sure to be a hit without hitting readers over the head with message.
Esther C. Ball, Carver Elementary School, Newport News, VA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

It is a great way to talk to your kids about making and keeping new friends.
adminsr
As a school social worker, I also highly recommend this book for all groups of kids as it teaches what is a true friend.
L. Kinnaman
This book was VERY basic and geared for a younger child, but I feel that it is a great book for any parent.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

77 of 80 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 5, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book is an excellent tool for parents and teachers to use with kids in the often times daunting world of social relatedness. Even kids who are very social would enjoy the way these gentle reminders are presented. Highly recommended for the special needs arena of Aspberger's and High Functioning Autism. Our autistic son loved and responded well to the almost "social story" approach. This truly spelled out a lot of social do's and don't's for him. His typical sister loved it as well. As a parent I highly recommend this book be in every kindergarden and first grade and second grade classroom. I bought several copies.
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88 of 96 people found the following review helpful By Tom on November 30, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I do not write reviews often, only when I am unbelievably pleased or completely disappointed. My 3 1/2 has had a tough time making friends with peers. We bought a couple of books and videos as one means for helping her along.

Let me start by recommending the series of books by Cheri J. Meiners. The books don't even compare in regards to teaching my 3 1/2 year old lessons related to friendship and interacting with others...check them out.

As for the book being reviewed, as one reviewer commented the pages are much too busy. In addition, there is a lot of negative content meant to teach children what behavior to avoid, however for a 3 1/2 year old, I think the more exposure they get to negativity the more apt they are to emulate it. Examples:

"You Stupidosaurus!"
"You can't play it's only for boys!"
"Nya, Nya, na, na, na"
"You can't play with her. You're my best friend."
"This game is dumb I quit!"

I'm not naive enough not to realize that my child will be exposed to this, but to be exposed to these concept at 3 1/2 via a book, could be counter productive.

Even the section on ways to be a friend has examples I found asinine:

"My parents are getting divorced. Please don't tell anyone." "I won't"...Can you think of better examples to emulate trust? Yeah me too.

If these quotes haven't deterred you, then spend away, but do check out the Cheri J. Meiners series as I can tell you the books were far and away better for my 3 1/2 year old.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By C. Perkins on February 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
My son originally received this book as a gift from a family member. He loved to have this book read to him and later to read it for himself. In my opinion, this book is a great tool at home and in school to teach young children what it means to be a friend - something that is difficult to learn for some children.

Since my son has now out-grown this book - I use it in my tutoring classes and plan to use it later when I become a full-time teacher.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jodi Jacobs on March 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
With caddiness starting at even earlier ages these days, I bought this book to help my 6 year old daughter understand that not everyone demostrates good friendship. She's so sensitive and doesn't understand why others don't respect her feelings. This book reiterates how to be a good friend and how not to be. It praises being kind and caring so it reinforced what she knew to be correct behavior. The illustrations she recognized immediately to be Marc Brown's adorable and colorful characters. I highly recommend this to any child who's learning to deal with bullies and pushy kids in school.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Reviewer on September 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
This teaches that friendship is reciprocal - your child doesn't have to go along with other kids all the time and they, in turn are expected to reciprocate by letting your child come first. Good teaching book. Too many books advocate giving guests their way at the expense of their host. Fortunately, this one doesn't. Useful for classes and families.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Julie's mommy on April 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
.. and should be listed as such. My daughter loves this book, she is very intent as we read it, which means she is taking it in. She has been diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome, which is a high-functioning form of autism. These kids have difficulty with social situations, and they are visual learners, so this is awesome.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Judy Zimmer, The Universal Grandma on August 11, 2011
Format: Paperback
I would return this book but it is too late. Here's what I didn't like. In giving examples of what not to do they give examples that use words kids find funny like "Stupidosaurus" that can plant ideas of bad behavior. At a very early age kids can't differentiate between good and bad examples. My 4 year old grandkids would never use the word bored but this book uses it and now they want to know what bored is. There is an example of a boy running after a girl and the girl saying "he's my boyfriend." It's not even used as a bad example. Don't want my kids thinking that it's OK for boys to chase you if you don't want them too. Although there are good examples the bad ones make this book dissappointing (there are many others) and not a good way to teach about friendship.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By "karenl3616" on December 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
My two boys love this book. Its a childs simplistic version of "How to be a Friend" and it is great. Right on their level and easy for them to relate to. The Arthur type characters are appealing to children and they make the book their choice for the evening and want me to read it again and again :) I have the hardback, it was a great find.
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