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How to Break Out of Prison Hardcover – August 16, 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Welcome Rain Publishers; 1 edition (August 16, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1566492394
  • ISBN-13: 978-1566492393
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,396,465 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

"Corporate executives and crime czars have a lot in common.... Just about any truly competent upper-level drug operator could lead a legitimate business unit," observes business consultant Wareham. The author, who has spent time not only teaching prisoners how to adjust to life on the outside but also training international business leaders, theorizes that, on both cellblocks and executive floors, people create "mental prisons" for themselves that may inhibit them from leading the lives they want to live. He explains how corporate executives often exhibit sentiments similar to inmates', which prevent them from working effectively and enjoying life. One of the book's most powerful sections, "How to Sound the Bugle and Advance to the Rear," identifies the common theme of catching people's attention by doing something that is at once self-important and counterproductive. To illustrate this, Wareham tells of a newly released prisoner who attends night classes that run so late into the evening that he misses evening curfew and thus violates parole. Meanwhile, his executive counterpart, at the helm of a troubled company, calls for bold new corporate initiatives and promptly books a round-the-world flight to meet with prospective clients in the hope that "someone on the ground will find a solution, somehow." Both personages have thus sounded the bugle and advanced to the rear. Wareham's unusual sociological premise, real-life examples, highly readable format and self-assessment personality quizzes will appeal to those seeking to change their lives.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Lecturer Wareham (Secrets of a Corporate Headhunter) writes that "all prisons are mental prisons" from which no one is exempt and that "even the sanest among us routinely become trapped in unrealistic value systems." Interesting parallels are drawn between two disparate groups: corporate executives and hardened criminals. The former can become trapped in psychological prisons just as the latter are trapped in mental states that lead them to prison. Invigorating writing, bold ideas, and an almost cocky tone combine with edgy, intricate logic to create a book that is not an effortless read but will result in a fresh and energized perspective. Though Tom Bay and David Macpherson's Change Your Attitude: Creating Success One Thought at a Time has broader appeal, Wareham's energy not to mention his effective use of Shakespearean quotes will charm many. Recommended.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

John Wareham is a leadership psychologist, lecturer, writer and poet whose work transcends genre. His latest work, Sonnets for Sinners, Everything One Needs to Know About Illicit Love, uses poems by classic and modern poets to illustrate the perils of love-triangles. His prior work, a novel, The President's Therapist, as only fiction can, examines the troubled psyche of the 43rd United States President, George W. Bush. Earlier works include Secrets of a Corporate Headhunter, a popular business bestseller, The Anatomy of a Great Executive, a 13-language reference classic, How to Break Out of Prison, a life-changer, and Chancey On Top, a critically acclaimed novel that explores themes of leadership, love, and enlightenment.

John draws upon vast experience, having counseled top business leaders on three continents, and, at the other end of the social spectrum, transformed the lives of prison inmates in New York's toughest prisons. His firm, Wareham Associates, specializes in corporate leadership selection and development. He is also founder and chief executive of The Eagles Foundation of America, a non-profit organization dedicated to developing leaders within the prison population. He makes his home in New York.

Insight and wit hallmark his writing. "If I'd not entered the consulting world I flatter myself that I might have been a full time novelist," he says. "I wrote my first book to promote my firm. When it was nominated for a national award I got hooked on the process, and just kept on going. It was a treat to see my business books become bestsellers, and I also got a lot of pleasure from the reaction to How to Break Out of Prison. It was a challenge to write a cross-over self-development work for overachievers and prison inmates alike. It's always satisfying when people say that you helped them get what they want from life.

"All in all, however, I'm proudest of my novels, The President's Therapist and Chancey On Top, both of which chronicle the psychological journeys of flawed leaders. My publisher says the only good poet is a dead poet, but the chance to inject a little poetry into the passion seemed too good to miss, and I've been excited by the warm reaction of literary critics to this conceit. I was happy, too, with how both books played out. The test of a novel is credibility and a denouement that satifies and surprises the reader, and critics say I reached that lofty plateau. I just have to confess that, even to me, both endings came as shockers."

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jesse L. Maghan on August 9, 2002
Format: Hardcover
There but for you go I! -- Life skills expert, John Wareham, has created a stark journal vividly exposing the dual desperados of deceit and venality in corporate boardrooms with the inverted and deceiving mindset of petty hustlers and criminals -- the bits and pieces of humanity that continuously stream in-and-out of our prisons and jails. The reader will discover that the caveat of Wareham's remarkable tract is immediately made clear in exposing the potentiality for solipsism and self-sabotage embodied in us all.
Prisons have often been referred to as laboratories of "what is not working" in a society. Here is your chance to come the closest you'll ever come to understanding the enigmatic nature of recidivism via participating in a remarkable series of encounter groups with inmates confined in the world's largest municipal detention center, the Rikers Island Correctional Complex of the New York City Department of Correction. With a beautiful and concise depiction of the discontent often expressed in a wide variety of group therapy sessions as sick and tired of being sick and tired, Wareham offers up a profound and creative thesis of transforming a specious sense of personal autonomy into a pure sense of freedom. Everyone wants what everyone else wants: to be heard and to make a difference.
Ironically, the self-elucidating nature of Wareham's journey into the heart and soul of Riker's Island becomes even more transparent in light of the spurious greed among the current cast of corporate crooks bilking our pensions and investment portfolios. In Chapter One, you will meet a classic Type-A, CEO: His haughtiness and irritation suggests a man imprisoned by the very sense of inferiority that he's so desperate to deny.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dina B. on November 27, 2008
Format: Paperback
Each chapter begins with a quote that makes you think before you even start digging into the chapter. The author includes so many interesting examples of both CEOs and inmates behavior, that you can't help but compare your own attitudes and actions to some, and begin to understand how these deep rooted patterns of thinking are imprisoning you from achieving what you want out of life. This is not a book to skim through; you really need to read it completely and carefully, but I highly recommend doing so. The author includes interesting historical incidents as well as his own personal experiences throughout and they are all worthwhile. The book is intelligent, entertaining and thought provoking. I highly recommend it.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ellen Bracchi on September 24, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This is a book that everyone who is not enjoying a truly happy and successful life should read. It takes a fascinating look at the dynamics of what makes people successful or not. The correlation between positive and negative executive behavior vs. criminal behavior is intriguing and very well developed. Wareham constantly draws on real characters and real circumstances to make his points with great wit and warmth. I doubt if there is anything out there that even begins to compare to the unique subject matter of this book.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tom Morgan on October 8, 2002
Format: Hardcover
In his new book, How to Break Out of Prison, John Wareham once again shares some of his brilliant insights into the way our minds work. The book reflects how his own thinking and writing has matured over the years to the point that no home or business library should be without a copy.
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