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How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America: Problems in Race, Political Economy, and Society (South End Press Classics Series) Paperback – December 1, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0896085794 ISBN-10: 0896085791 Edition: Revised Edition

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Product Details

  • Series: South End Press Classics Series (Book 4)
  • Paperback: 372 pages
  • Publisher: South End Press; Revised Edition edition (December 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0896085791
  • ISBN-13: 978-0896085794
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #144,426 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America has...set the standard of achievement for the current generation of Afro-American scholar-activists." -- Race & Class

About the Author

Manning Marable is Director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University in New York City, where he lives. He is one of the most widely read black progressive authors in the country. Marable's political commentary series, "Along the Color Line," appears in more than 320 publications internationally. He is the author of Black Liberation in Conservative America (South End Press, 1997), Black Leadership (Columbia University Press), Beyond Black and White: Transforming African-American Politics (Verso), Speaking Truth to Power: Essays on Race, Resistance and Radicalism (Westview). Marable edits the South End Press Classics Series.

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Customer Reviews

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29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Chris on January 3, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This at times slightly difficult to read book is very relevant even if the text of the book was published in 1983. Let me give you an idea of the discussion in the book below.
This January 2000 edition contains a new intro by the learned professor. He tries to correct in it a few observations and predictions he believes he got wrong in the original addition. He points out that spectacular growth of the prison-industrial complex since 1981 with an increase of the prison population from 500,000 in 1981 to almost 2 million today. He points out that as jobs with livable wages continue to disappear and with the stock market casino which drove the economy of the 90's getting wrecked, thousands more poor and even middle class whites along with blacks and other minorities will turn up in the prison system. One in five Americans, he writes, now has a criminal record.
In any case, this book is about how Capitalism is black Americans greatest enemy. Racism is an integral part of American capitalism, he stresses. Blacks enslaved because of their race created the wealth which gave this country its economic foundations. Blacks in the South, imprisoned justly or unjustly, provided an ultra-cheap source of labor in the convict-work system under conditions not too far from Nazi concentration camps. He writes that in the 1880's, the mortality rate for blacks in prison in Mississippi was 11 percent. In Arkansas it was 25 percent.
he notes that blacks and white workers combining their power could have made great gains. That they did not is perhaps he says why the standard of living has been so low in the South relative to the rest of the country. White workers apparently were more comfortably keeping blacks down to maintain their status in the white supremacist culture.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
A wonderful critique of how blacks have been victimized and belittled in this racist/sexist state. A must read for all races. A real eye opener. Still as valid as the day it was published.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on September 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America is an updated edition of Manning Marable's classic in black literature, and has received a new introduction and an update to the book's tables and charts to reflect the latest new data on Afro-American statistics. Marable's cogent and comprehensvie analysis of race and class in the United States down through the country's political and economic history to modern times continues to provide important food for though for a contemporary readership.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Daniel on June 26, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Marable does it again. Everyone interested in Black political economy in the US needs to read this book!!
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