How to Cook a Dragon and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $1.71 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Used, but looks brand new. Only very slight signs of use. Cover and binding are undamaged, and pages are crisp and unmarked. Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

How to Cook a Dragon: Living, Loving, and Eating in China Paperback – November 18, 2008


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.24
$0.01 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

How to Cook a Dragon: Living, Loving, and Eating in China + Bento Box in the Heartland: My Japanese Girlhood in Whitebread America
Price for both: $28.37

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the China Books Store
Interested in browsing our full selection of books related to China? Visit our China Books Store.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Seal Press; Original edition (November 18, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 158005255X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580052559
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.3 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,640,051 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"At age 30, author, food writer and Chronicle contributor Linda Furiya moved from San Francisco to Beijing to follow her then-boyfriend. She had no idea that during the next several years, her path would take her back and forth across the Pacific Ocean on a quest to find love, contentment and ultimately, herself. In How to Cook a Dragon, Furiya offers an extremely candid and detailed look into her life both in China and the United States during that time, with anecdotes about the people she met, the food she ate and cooked, and the lessons she learned. To punctuate the stories, Furiya includes recipes at the end of each chapter - a corn, pine nut and bell pepper side dish, for example, that she ate during her first duck dinner in Beijing, or the steamed whole fish she learned how to make at a cooking school in Shanghai." --San Francisco Chronicle

Review

"Linda Furiya tackles the challenges of being a Japanese American woman and journalist living in China with her pen, her wok and her indomitable spirit. How to Cook a Dragon is a personal journey, through a land at a crossroads if its history. It's a poignant tale with many layers of textures and flavors--much like an elaborate Chinese banquet. Indeed, the best way to slay the cultural dragon is by cooking it."

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Susan Blumberg-Kason VINE VOICE on December 2, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Linda Furiya's first food memoir, "Bento Box in the Heartland" was a telling account of the hardships she faced as a minority growing up in middle America. Her honest and revealing stories about crossing cultures between her family's Japanese customs and her friends' and classmates' perspectives were unique and thought-provoking. When I picked up her second food memoir, "How to Cook a Dragon", about her time in China, I wondered how this new memoir would compare to her first. I wasn't disappointed. In fact, where Furiya's first book revealed much about her childhood, her second addresses adult issues that are that much more difficult to deal with when halfway across the world, in a country with a foreign language and culture. "How to Cook a Dragon" is one of the most honest China memoirs I've read. For anyone who has lived abroad without an established support network, "How to Cook a Dragon" will resonate well. The book will also be enjoyed by anyone who has an interest in China or who has taken a gamble with love. Like "Bento Box", the recipes at the end of the book are a nice feature--delicious and not too difficult to prepare. As such, the reader should beware: don't read on an empty stomach unless the ingredients in the recipes are close at hand.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mary Elizabeth Williams on March 3, 2009
Format: Paperback
In the followup to the lovely Bento Box in the Heartland, Linda Furiya takes the reader on a journey through her eye opening experiences living in Beijing and Shanghai. The book is a soulful examination of culture and expectations (what's it like to be American, of Japanese heritage, in a country where everbody assumes you're just like them?), a frank exploration of love and relationships, and a celebration of the people -- and the food -- of China.

A wonderful accomplishment and an entertaining read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book, which I relate to as a former expatriate. My guess is that some of the less favorable reviews are from people who don't share that experience with the author. I thought the writing was descriptive, engaging, and unique in the use of food as part of the chronology. I remember many of my own life experiences in the context of special meals and restaurants. It's not necessarily the food itself, but who you are with and where you are at in your life experience that has the potential to make this memorable. Opportunities for personal growth often come when we are removed from our usual element and find ourselves in places or situations that challenges us. The author does of fine job of presenting her own experience in a way that should give many people insight into their own lives and relationships. The thoughtful reader will gain insight from the author's experience and be richer for it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By sweet pea guardian on July 17, 2010
Format: Paperback
I had read and enjoyed the author;s previous book. I picked this one up from the library from a recommendation. This book is, as noted above, a boring chronicle of the author's personal relationship. There are a few interesting insights into life in China and a few recipes as well. All in all it is not worth reading. Don't waste your time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again