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How Did That Get in My Lunchbox?: The Story of Food Paperback – February 12, 2013


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How Did That Get in My Lunchbox?: The Story of Food + Good Enough to Eat: A Kid's Guide to Food and Nutrition + The Vegetables We Eat
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 870L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick; Reprint edition (February 12, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0763665037
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763665036
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 8.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #39,770 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Chris Butterworth is the author of Sea Horse: The Shyest Fish in the Sea, winner of a John Muir prize for natural history writing. The author of many nonfiction books for children, she lives in Cornwall, England.

Lucia Gaggiotti is a graphic designer, packager, and illustrator whose images of food have been used by many food companies in London, including Carluccios and Pizza Express. She lives in London.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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I might suggest that the book be taken to school for the teacher to read to the class!
Nana
We took the time to savor each page's illustrations, and I could see the figurative light bulbs going off in my children's heads as we read this book.
Inhabiting Books
Both the illustrations and story were fun and engaging and my kids really liked the story itself.
Dad of Divas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Yana V. Rodgers on January 25, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Young children may take the contents of their lunchboxes for granted, but quite some activity went into producing those food items and beverages. The sandwich bread had its beginnings in a wheat field, the cheese filling came from a dairy that transformed cow's milk into curds, the apple juice box had its origins at an apple orchard, and the chocolate chip cookie would not have its chips were it not for the cocoa beans grown abroad.

This brightly illustrated book offers a lively opportunity to introduce children to the concepts of natural, capital, and human resources, often among the first set of economics concepts that children are expected to learn in the primary grades. Children can relate firsthand to these ideas when they think about the roles of farms, food processing facilities, and transportation networks in producing their lunchbox foods.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Inhabiting Books on May 8, 2011
Format: Hardcover
"One of the best parts of the day is when you lift the lid of your lunchbox to see what's inside."
(First sentence.)

I'm willing to bet that your young children, if they're not living on a farm, exhibit a certain disconnect regarding where their food actually comes from. This book will change that. The text and pictures of this eminently readable book do a superb job of providing essential knowledge in a fun way by breaking down the food production chain of certain lunchbox items (bread, cheese, tomatoes, apple juice, carrots, chocolate chip cookies, and clementines) into sequential steps.

But the information doesn't end with the lunchbox. The book goes on to briefly talk about healthy food choices beyond your lunchbox, and the importance of a healthy balanced diet. There is a short Food Facts page at the end with some excellent advice like...

"Your body is growing all the time (even when you're asleep!) So remember, don't skip breakfast - it gets your body through the day."

My 7 year-old Olivia read this book to us all, with her sisters by her side looking intently at the pictures. We took the time to savor each page's illustrations, and I could see the figurative light bulbs going off in my children's heads as we read this book. Even though most of the knowledge was not new to them - we have discussed where food comes from many times before - I thought this book really helped them (and me!) actually understand the process better.

Chris Butterworth's clear, well-written text and Lucia Gaggiotti's engaging illustrations make this book so worth reading.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By baldtomato on July 10, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Foods included: Bread (loaves, flour), cheese, apple-juice (apples), tomatoes, chocolate chip, carrots, clementine (oranges). It's a good general format for me to follow when the kiddo then asks me about any other food item... or retailed item really. I thought it's a little redundant for them to have both the apple juice and clementine (almost identical process for apples and oranges), while skip out any meat or fish products altogether except cheese. I suppose the author intentionally wanna avoid having to deal with topics of animal-slaughter, killing moving creatures etc, and not wanna insult any vegetarian or vegan customers. For me, it would have been nice to have that included though - hence the 4 stars instead of 5.
Appreciate their choice of thick paper that's somewhat spill-guarded. Not sure if it would withstand a heavy liquid spill, but as my kid reads it next to his pasta plate ... i at least have the option of wiping it clean with a damp cloth :-)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By crafty on November 10, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Excellent little book to teach young children where food comes from....which is really, really important for adults to know too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nana on October 4, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was received quite well. It opened a whole conversation of those foods that are good for growing bodies. Unfortunately our 6 year old granddaughter's class has a short lunch period and the class is not allowed to talk! It's strictly eating business. So it's nice to talk about the book at home. I might suggest that the book be taken to school for the teacher to read to the class!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. McLaughlin on August 20, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book has been a great tool to get my daughter thinking about where food comes from and what it goes through to end up on her plate or in her lunchbox. It's well designed with great illustrations and fun to read and discuss. She asks to read it on a regular basis and references it in conversation when we're eating. Strongly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Thomas on June 17, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love reading this book to young students because the colorful illustrations help tell the story of how our food comes from the farm.
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