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How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food? Hardcover – September 1, 2005


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How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food? + How Do Dinosaurs Say Good Night? + How Do Dinosaurs Play with Their Friends?
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 5 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - Kindergarten
  • Lexile Measure: 490L (What's this?)
  • Series: How Do Dinosaurs…
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: The Blue Sky Press; 1st edition (September 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439241022
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439241021
  • Product Dimensions: 12.1 x 9.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,243 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 2–Another addition to the humorous series that began with How Do Dinosaurs Say Good Night? (Scholastic, 2000). In the first part of the book, dinosaurs burp, belch, and display all kinds of other inappropriate behaviors during breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Spinosaurus doesn't eat all his food...[he spits] out his broccoli partially chewed. Quetzalcoatlus fusses, fidgets, and squirms in his chair in a restaurant, while Amargasaurus flips his spaghetti high into the air. But, is this the way that dinosaurs should act? Of course not. So, a very genteel Cryolophosaurus says please and thank you while sitting very still, Lambeosaurus tries everything at least once, and Spinosaurus never drops anything onto the floor. In the last image, a very proper Cryolophosaurus–with pinky in the air–daintily eats his pancakes. The book is great fun, and sure to be popular with dinosaur lovers. Hidden in the illustration on each page is the proper name of the reptile portrayed therein. Teague's gouache-and-ink illustrations contain just the right amount of detail and whimsy, and they are large enough for storytime sharing. Children not yet old enough to read will still enjoy looking at the pictures by themselves.–Roxanne Burg, Orange County Public Library, CA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

PreS-Gr. 2. After a brief foray into board books, the founders of the How Do Dinosaurs . . . dynasty return to the picture-book format of How Do Dinosaurs Say Good-Night? (2000) and How Do Dinosaurs Get Well Soon? (2003) with an entry on another familiar parent-child minefield--mealtime. These terrible lizards have correspondingly terrible table manners; they burp, hurl spaghetti, and gleefully shove green beans up a giant reptilian nostril. Subsequent scenes of dinos "sit[ting] quite still" and beaming with "smiles and goodwill" offer examples of correct behavior; but even the mealtime "don'ts" offer useful information in hand-painted labels identifying each kaleidoscopically patterned creature. Don't miss queztalcoatus screeching at a restaurant waitress, or upersaurus inspecting his nutritious supper (Teague emphasizes the enormity of the latter beast through clever use of both on- and off-page space). Once again kids will chortle over Teague's clever images of adults dwarfed by toothy miscreants, and both parents and children will recognize the hilarious parallels with occasionally naughty human kids who loom dinosaur-large within their respective households. Jennifer Mattson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Born and raised in New York City, Jane Yolen now lives in Hatfield, Massachusetts. She attended Smith College and received her master's degree in education from the University of Massachusetts. The distinguished author of more than 170 books, Jane Yolen is a person of many talents. When she is not writing, Yolen composes songs, is a professional storyteller on the stage, and is the busy wife of a university professor, the mother of three grown children, and a grandmother. Active in several organizations, Yolen has been on the Board of Directors of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, was president of the Science Fiction Writers of America from 1986 to 1988, is on the editorial board of several magazines, and was a founding member of the Western New England Storytellers Guild, the Western Massachusetts Illustrators Guild, and the Bay State Writers Guild. For twenty years, she ran a monthly writer's workshop for new children's book authors. In 1980, when Yolen was awarded an honorary Doctor of Law degree by Our Lady of the Elms College in Chicopee, Massachusetts, the citation recognized that "throughout her writing career she has remained true to her primary source of inspiration--folk culture." Folklore is the "perfect second skin," writes Yolen. "From under its hide, we can see all the shimmering, shadowy uncertainties of the world." Folklore, she believes, is the universal human language, a language that children instinctively feel in their hearts. All of Yolen's stories and poems are somehow rooted in her sense of family and self. The Emperor and the Kite, which was a Caldecott Honor Book in 1983 for its intricate papercut illustrations by Ed Young, was based on Yolen's relationship with her late father, who was an international kite-flying champion. Owl Moon, winner of the 1988 Caldecott Medal for John Schoenherr's exquisite watercolors, was inspired by her husband's interest in birding. Yolen's graceful rhythms and outrageous rhymes have been gathered in numerous collections. She has earned many awards over the years: the Regina Medal, the Kerlan Award, the World Fantasy Award, the Society of Children's Book Writers Award, the Mythopoetic Society's Aslan Award, the Christopher Medal, the Boy's Club Jr. Book Award, the Garden State Children's Book Award, the Daedalus Award, a number of Parents' Choice Magazine Awards, and many more. Her books and stories have been translated into Japanese, French, Spanish, Chinese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Afrikaans, !Xhosa, Portuguese, and Braille. With a versatility that has led her to be called "America's Hans Christian Andersen," Yolen, the child of two writers, is a gifted and natural storyteller. Perhaps the best explanation for her outstanding accomplishments comes from Jane Yolen herself: "I don't care whether the story is real or fantastical. I tell the story that needs to be told."

Customer Reviews

My 4 year old grandaughter loves this book.
N. Clark
Overall this is a great book and I would recommend it to anyone with preschool aged children.
Tim
Expect to have that umpteenth reading, too, since this one is sure to become a favorite.
Heidi Anne Heiner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Heidi Anne Heiner VINE VOICE on September 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Jane Yolen and Mark Teague offer us a fifth "How Do Dinosaurs,,,?" title that is fresh and fun for both parents and children, fortunately back in hardcover format. Yolen's effortless text is once again perfectly matched with Teague's vivid illustrations of dinosaurs at meal time, first behaving badly and then with grace and charm. The formula has been proven effective in the previous titles but is far from trite or redundant even the fifth time around thanks to the talents of author and illustrator. Children also receive a message about manners that is far from didactic or dull, but couched in humor that parents should still enjoy after the umpteenth reading. Expect to have that umpteenth reading, too, since this one is sure to become a favorite.

I just introduced the title to a storytime group and the response was positive. Children and parents sat quietly, excited to see what the dinosaurs will do next. This book, like the others in the series, are perfect for large groups or just one on one time between parent and child.

Highest recommendation.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By T. Boyles on September 22, 2005
Format: Hardcover
My 5yr old son loves the dinosaur series.

This book is his new favorite!!!

It does address things like table manners and rude "noises" @ the table -- which is a great thing for a 5 yr old boy who thinks those noises are funny.

Get this and all the "How do Dinosaurs..." books!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By TwinMom on November 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I received this book as a gift from my cousin. She told me that buying books for my kids is scary because my husband is a published fantasy author...it's a bit like cooking for her brother, the Sous Chef.

Anyway, my 15-month-old twins have loved this book from the very start. Right now they don't understand all the words, but I enjoy reading it to them anyway. The dinosaurs' mannerisms are very apropos, so I get a laugh even though I read and reread the same 15 pages. They absolutely love the vibrant illustrations. Each time we read the book, they point out something new...a cat here, a dog there, the bib on a dinosaur.

Simply put, this is one of our whole family's favorites. I am buying copies to give other parents as gifts.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mike on March 1, 2006
Format: Hardcover
(I have to write reviews for a class I'm in so here's mine for this book):

How does a dinosaur eat all his food? Does he burp, does he belch, or make noises quite rude? All of these questions, and more, are asked in How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food? by Jane Yolen. The book rhymes its way through a variety of ill-behaved dinosaurs in various settings using bright, colorful illustrations to show the many ways that dinosaurs can make a mess with their meals. Each page asks a silly question of how a dinosaur would eat a meal and you may be surprised by the answers provided in the second half of the book. Teague's illustrations, which are big and colorful, add the necessary humor to make sure the story holds the children's attention to give the message of the importance of good manners. Another nice part of the illustrations is that they show a new dinosaur on each page and label it somewhere in the picture. Young children will absolutely love the different mealtime disasters the dinosaurs create: from the throwing of food to sticking beans up their nose. Older children will be humorously reminded of younger siblings and the troubles parents have with getting them to eat nicely. Parents will appreciate the overall message that even dinosaurs eat properly and with manners. Yes, dinosaurs use their good manners when they eat and reading this book will help your own little dinosaurs learn the importance of using theirs.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By elanorh on March 20, 2006
Format: Hardcover
We love this book, my daughter is about 2 1/2 and likes dinosaurs (as a result of this book). There is so much detail in the illlustrations (she spends a great deal of time looking at the pictures on the frontspiece, identifying what they're eating).

I'm afraid when her sibling arrives she'll be disappointed that s/he is not a dinosaur, because she really is charmed by the human parents with dinosaur children.

We read the page about "stick beans up their nose" as "smash beans on their nose" in hopes that she doesn't take that page as a cue to stick food up her nose. Since my sister visited the ER a couple times for the food she'd lodged waaaay up her nose.

I highly recommend this book for anyone who's looking for a fun, entertaining, and educational (somewhat) book for any child from 1-6 years of age, and for their parents too.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mom to a little dinosaur lover on September 29, 2008
Format: Hardcover
My two-and-half-year-old daughter loves these "How-To" dinosaur books. I bought How Do Dinosaurs Go To School? first, which she was hooked on and triggered me to buy this one, which she equally loves. She can memorize and articulate all the 10 dinosaurs names provided in the book, just as she could with the other dinosaur book, which also introduces 10 types of dinosaurs. However, while the illustrations are highly entertaining to a toddler, the language, like that in the other book, is quite lackluster. It would be ideal if the book also shed some literary value and were enjoyable to read aloud to a child as well.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Bookphile TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 10, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I love this book because it reminds me so much of a typical dinner at our house, complete with trying to convince my daughter to try what we put on her plate. The illustrations are truly funny, with human parents attempting to coax their dinosaur children into behaving at the table. The book does a great job of teaching children about table manners without preaching at them. It's great fun to read and sure to provoke many a giggle.
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