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How the Earth Was Made: The Complete Season 2 Blu-Ray Edition
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on September 7, 2010
How the Earth Was Made - Season 2
13 Episodes on 4 Discs, released June 29, 2010

"How the Earth Was Made" is the History channel's detailed look at specific areas of the planet and how they came to be shaped the way they are. The title of the series sounds like they would explain how Earth came into being with the Big Bang theory in one episode and boom! be done, but this is the second season so they've really stretched out individual landmarks.

This series starts off with places like The Grand Canyon and its carving by the Colorado river among other things, Mt. Vesuvius and its ability to possibly kill 3 million people in Naples if it erupts, and then in the third episode finally gets into the actual planet formation or "Birth of the Earth". Does this mean it wasn't covered in the first season?? Other great episodes include Sahara where you find out it was once covered in ice and grew lots of plantlife, and much more in the way of mountains, valleys, volcanoes in general, ice ages, and fascinatingly enough, the concentration of gold around the world.

The narrator sure knows how to make gradual evolution sound exciting! For example in the Grand Canyon episode, he mentions certain mountains were "shattered *dramatic pause* by VOLCANOES!" The end of each episode goes through the laundry list of clues the scientists found and conclusions they were brought to step by step in case you missed something. Evolution ought to be a slow, boring process but this format and narration makes it more exciting than the violent escapes of "Ancients Behaving Badly" that I reviewed not that long ago. This is a very interesting and educational series and will appeal greatly to those intrigued by our landscapes and captivated by its beauty and history.
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31 of 37 people found the following review helpful
Did you know that North America and Scotland were once connected? Why are there remnants of sea creatures on top of mountains and mountains under the sea? This is one of the most fascinating series I've ever watched. We humans think we have so much control over the future of this planet. Yes, recycling and being "green" will help, but ultimately, the planet will do what the planet has always done -- change on its own,whether humans do anything or not. I highly recommend this truly amazing series.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on May 12, 2012
The plus of this series of 13 programs on 4 DVDs is that it allows scientists to illustrate geological analyses, principles, and theories, in classicalgeological settings or in their laboratory, and integrates various appoaches to try to resolve questions. The down side for me is that it is often too repetitive in reviewing what has been presented, is sometimes too elementary and simplistic, and sometimes presents controversial theories as generaqlly accepted facts. Also, there is perhaps too much emphasis on relatively recent spectacular volcanic and glaciation events at the expense of superficially more mundane, but equally important, geology(How many times was I presented with a spouting soda bottle as a volcanic eruption analogy?). Let's take a look at the specific topics covered, with my comments, as a non-professional geology enthusiast.
DVD#1 Begins with the massive non-tectonic-related lava flows in Siberia of about 250 MYA, which are generally believed responsible for the approximately simultaneous most devastating mass extinction in the history of life. This is a good presentation, noting the probable involvement of the coal layer through which much of the lava had to flow, and the probable involvement of ocean methane hydrates, but doesn't mention the probable involvement of other toxic volcanic substances, such as sulphur dioxide and mercury.
Next, is a rundown of of the continental glaciations of North America, mostly the last one. I found this presentation too elementary and incomplete. Finally, a program on America's gold deposits and mining. This is limited to deposits in CA and Nevada, which is OK, given the time constraints. The point is that different gold deposits were often formed in different ways, but with some commonalities. This was one of the more informative prograqms for me.
DVD#2 Starts with a consideration of how the Grand Canyon was likely formed. Generally informative;however, the viewer is left with indecision as to whether the 'spilled lake' theory or the traditional common sense down-cutting by the Colorado and tributaries theory was mainly responsible. Also, the probable importance of wetter times, hence much faster erosion, during glacial periods, is not mentioned. .. Next is a consideratin of the immense danger posed by a very active Mt. Vesuvius to the surrounding populated region. The various types of subduction-induced volcanic products are dramatized. I don't think it was mentioned that Vesuvius is but one of a whole chain of volcanoes in Italy resulting from the subduction of the African plate...Next is a consideration of theories and facts relating to the central question of how and when the earth and its major features of oceans and continents formed, along with the moon. I thought this was one of the best programs...Finally, a consideration of the geological and fossil history of the Sahara. Rather good, with a warning about the danger of overexploitation of the fossil water under that desolate surface. The importance of off shore oceanic sediment core analysis in documenting and dating various climate changes was emphasized.
DVD#3 Begins with Yosemite, primarily the Valley, but somewhat with the surrounding region. Very good program, presenting various theories and facts relating to the formation of the valley, and why this granite is often so resistant to erosion. In addition to Muir's widely disseminated valley glacier theory, Whitney's discounted dropped basin theory, Matthes's theory emphasizing river erosion, followed by glacial scupting, and Shaffer's more recent emphasis on increased jointing with uplift combined with exfoliation, are presented. .The Rockies program concentrated on the CO,WY and NM portions, illustrating how fossils indicate a former seabed and suggest a former higher Rockies. The sticky question of why the Rockies formed when they did is briefly dealt with, with evidence of a weak zone in the earth's crust here. It wasn't mentioned that mountains formed in this region long before the present Rockies. The peculiar route of certain WY rivers through mountain ranges is explained. But, it is not explained why WY mountains were once buried so deep by their sediments, nor why these sediments were later removed by erosion(presumably regional uplifting). The little appreciated subject of the Rio Grande rift is also explored. ..Lastly, the mostly good program on the 'Ring of Fire' around the Pacific, relies largely on field trips to various places in Alaska and CA to deomonstrate the general principles of volcanoes and earthquakes as among the most visible or dramatic surface features resulting from subduction of larely oceanic tectonic plates in this region. The importance of the physical and chemical pecularaities of the typical lavas produced by such valcanoes as distinct from those produced by Hawaiian volcanoes, for example, is emphasized. Mineral and gaseous peculiarities that point to the presence of seawater-derived carbon and water in the mantle below these volcanic areas is presented. The discovery of mid-ocean ridges as sources of new ocean crust is documented. However, the now largely discounted theory is presented that tectonic plate movement is fueled mostly by push from mantle convection currents, rather than by the pull of subducting plates.
DVD#4 Starts with the geology of Mt. Everest, and to some extent the whole Himalayan and Tibetan region. Too much time is spent climbing Everest for rock samples. Also, unfortunately, the impression is given that most of this mountain is composed of granite. Other sources indicate that most of the mountain is composed of metamorphosed sedimentary rocks below the yellow marble layer, with granite-intruded gneiss below this. Also, the use of high energy galactic cosmic ray-induced Beryllium 10 isotope concentrations in rocks as a proxy for erosion rates is related as 'cosmic sunburn damage' to the rocks: an unnecessary presumption of viewer ignorance of the concept of radioactive isotopes. Evidence is presented supporting the collision of India into Asia theory of Himalaya formation, also for the channel flow theory of mantle movement of collision-indiced granite uplift into the Himalayas. However, other tenable theories of Himalayan and Tibetan uplift are not presented. Finally, it is suggested that the rise of the Himalayas induced the recent cool period in the earth's history: another very controversial theory, as there are reasonable alternative explanations...Next, the description of the geological history of Death Valley is good, being comparitively simple to figure out. Even the mechanism of the gliding of the 'walking boulders' across certain flat or slightly uphill plains is presented. For a more complete story, I recommend the book "Geology Underfoot in Death Valley and Owens Valley"... Lastly, the eruption of MT. Saint Helens and its consequences is considered, for the obvious reason that it is the most recent large volcanic eruption in the continental US, thus has been well documented and studied. It was also unusual in that the primary volcanic blast occured toward one side, rather than vertically. Some years later, a volcanic eruption in the Caribbean largely duplicated the features of this eruption, and warning signs allowed the timely evacuation of many people in harms way, as here documented.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on December 26, 2010
I teach middle school science and live in the Pacific Northwest. Being so close to Mt. St. Helens makes it easy to get students interested in volcanoes. This set contains an excellent explanation of the events that took place surrounding the eruptions at Mt. St. Helens. The other movies are equally good. These videos are informative, yet not at all boring. They move quickly.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on July 14, 2011
I just received and played How the Earth Was Made: Complete Season 2 [Blu-ray] and
...drum roll...
the quality is excellent and it IS widescreen ( 1.78:1 I believe (the box doesn't say [and amazon says 1.33:1 -Wrong!] ).
Regardless, it fills my 52" HD with video that History Channel televised in HD.

So, for those (including me) who were wondering: IT IS GOOD!
Will
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on September 18, 2012
The first season of "How The Earth Was Made" was excellent; the second season is absolutely great. My assessment might be colored by having seen almost all of Season One on TV but none of Season Two. But I think it's more than that. Season Two presents an even greater geological overview of each of the thirteen subjects; and presents them in greater forensic detail. Even subjects you might expect to be rather ho-hum because they've been detailed in so many different forums - such as Mt. St. Helen's and Vesuvius - end up being completely fascinating because of the great depth of the material presented. No matter what the subject is, or how often it's been done, there are still things you wouldn't have known unless you were a professional geologist. And speaking of geologists, their work is arguably the most important on the planet. Without them the earth would be simply a collection of mountains, oceans, rivers and dirt; through their efforts we're able to understand how it all pieces together.

My favorite episodes - surprisingly, I might add - are "Sahara" and "Death Valley." I thought I knew a lot about the Sahara, only to discover I knew almost nothing - certainly nothing about its 20,000 year cycle of monsoon activity. And, as to Death Valley, I couldn't imagine its geologic history being anywhere near as fascinating as it is. Of course it's one of the lowest and hottest points on earth; but the mantle beneath it is also the thinnest of anyplace on earth - and is being stretched even thinner. Even "Everest" opened all kinds of new windows on the planet, by showing not just how it was formed but how its formation affected almost everything else on the planet. GPS imaging proves Everest is still growing - as it proves the Rockies are shrinking, thanks to the forces of erosion plus the sheer weight of the mountains.

Though most of the subjects have had worldwide effects, only one - "Earth's Deadliest Eruption" - nearly extinguished all life on the planet. It was a particular type of volcanic eruption in Siberia that spewed lava and deadly gas for a million years and gave rise to what's known as "The Permian Extinction," when 95% of all living organisms became extinct. The series ends with another episode that might at first seem insignificant but becomes one of the most interesting forensic investigations: "America's Gold." It examines how gold deposits occurred in such quantity in both California and Nevada.

Though this series is more costly than some of the others currently being offered from The History Channel's archive, it's much newer - the last couple episodes are from 2010. And completely worth the cost. You don't just sit and watch, you actually learn enough geology that, by the final episodes, each time a certain configuration or rock or certain types of formations are shown, you think to yourself: "Aha! I know what that is and what it means!" Now that's cool.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 21, 2012
I love this series. I really like how they present the theories and the science and the scientific methods used to support the theory. I just wish History would go back to making programs like this, The Universe, etc. rather than the garbage they show now.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Other reviewers have described this show, so I will not. It was a favorite at our house. I assume it was cancelled because it was expensive to make. I have reached the point where I seldom watch TV, because so few shows are worth my time. This one was worth every minute. I am upset it was cancelled, and I wish there had been more shows on other interesting areas. I would like to see an episode on such subjects as vugs.

Vugs are gas bubbles formed in rock, which may contain quartz crystals, called geodes. when removed from the rock where they formed. They are usually small. There was once one the size of a large room. It was coated, on the inside, with flakes of pure gold. When the miners broke into it, in a mine near Cripple Creek, Colorado, in the late 1800's, they held their helmet lights out into the large dark open space. Imagine the glorious reflected light, from a sphere completely lined with gold. The mine owners put bank vault doors on the vug and two armed guards around the clock.

How about a special on this?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 25, 2012
One of the very best science programs I've ever seen on television. Each episode tells a fantastic story based on the incremental presentation of evidence rather than through speculation or simplification. Finally an intelligent, exciting science show that has too much faith in its viewership to dumb things down. I have no idea how a program this smart survived as long as it did on commercial television, but it left a huge hole when it got cancelled.

My absolute highest recommendation goes out to both seasons of this terrific series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 24, 2013
Picture quality was fantastc and i enjoyed the first season so I purchased this one. The first season I got before I had a blu- ray and I have to say the blu- ray version is noticeably better! For the price it is great and all the episodes are interesting. If you watch too many in a row the format starts to seem a bit repetitive but it is not too bothersome. I highly recommend this to anyone who is a geology and earth science fan. I think it would work well as an education tool in school science classes.
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