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How to Get on Jeopardy!... and Win: Valuable Information from a Champion Paperback – August 1, 1998


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 247 pages
  • Publisher: Citadel Pr (August 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0806519916
  • ISBN-13: 978-0806519913
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #937,139 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

84 of 86 people found the following review helpful By Alexandra Fiona Dixon on December 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
I just appeared on Jeopardy earlier this week - actually, I taped this week and will appear the week of March 13-17, 2000. I read the book before I went onto the show (but after I had been to the tryout, passed the test, and received 'the call' to appear on the show).
I definitely recommend that you read the first half of the book about tryouts, betting strategy etc. His betting strategy is excellent (although another reviewer pointed out some math errors), and he seems to be ahead of the curve. After I read his advice on betting and before I went on the show, I watched several weeks worth of games and noticed many - MANY - times where the person who placed second or third would have actually won the game using Dupee's strategy.
However, the second half of the book (trivia) is useless for at least two reasons. First, if you memorized every piece of trivia in this book it would not help you on an actual game very much if at all and it probably would not help you on a tryout. He also skips over a major category - religion - which surprised me, and he spends far too much time on food. Second, the book is typeset in such a way that the answer to each question appears immediately after the question but NOT on a separate line. Therefore if you are trying to read the question and formulate an answer before you see the actual answer, it is almost impossible to do so, rendering this section of the book almost useless for solo studying (although you could have someone read you the questions and then respond aloud). And, as other reviewers have noted, there are numerous factual errors in the book. For example, the first President born in the 20th century - in 1917 - was not Jimmy Carter, it was JFK.
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35 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Jack on January 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
I recently had the pleasure of becoming a five-time Jeopardy champion, and Mike Dupee's book helped in getting me to that position. I would echo many sentiments expressed by other reviewers. The "Learning the Facts" portion is not as useful as the rest of the book, as it gets bogged down in details and contains a few errors. However, it does have some useful tables, such as those for prominent dancers, artists and their identifiers, and major inventors/discoverers.
The real value of the book is in its discussion of the background information about the show. Mike's descriptions of the testing process and the day of taping are on target.
The book's analysis of the buzzer mechanism proved to be helpful. Although I found I couldn't prepare in advance for my buzzer technique, it was helpful to read about how you have to wait until someone offstage "opens the lines" for you to ring in and answer. At the same time, Mike was absolutely correct in saying you can't wait to see the lights around the board before you buzz. Keeping these ideas in mind, I came up with a method of timing the buzzer which worked more often than not.
Ultimately the section on betting strategy may have been the most valuable for me (although there is a math error noted by other reviewers). In my second game, I was in second place heading into Final Jeopardy and missed the question, yet I still won. Mike's discussion of the "two thirds rule" was foremost in my mind as I made my wager. Rather than betting everything, as so many 2nd and 3rd place players needlessly do, I made a smart wager which maximized my chances to win, and fortune was on my side.
Another reviewer felt that studying did not help her when she competed.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By mx5mike on May 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
I recently passed the Jeopardy! tryout test and am now waiting for "The Call." I figured it would be good to read up on what I could expect if I head out to California. This book did have a lot of good information, but there were some things that left me scratching my head.
The tax advice section in my book was so poorly edited that it was almost useless. In several places there appeared to be entire lines of text missing. I would get to the end of one line and the beginning of the next line would be in the middle of a totally different sentence! A very helpful section has been rendered considerably less useful by very sloppy editing.
Another section that gave me pause was the chapter explaining how to bet on Daily Doubles and Final Jeopardy!. But one of the scenarios is based upon the incorrect assumption that $7,100 minus $2,900 equals $4,500. This is not merely a typo, because the author's strategy is based upon this math mistake. Another scenario shows a chart twice, but in the second instance one of the figures is incorrectly repeated. It was of no consequence to the scenario, but it made me question the editing once again.
I have not read through the trivia section yet. With these errors, I am reluctant to for fear of what other mistakes may exist.
There is a lot of good strategy in this, the only Jeopardy! book I've ever read, but some blatant mistakes and sloppy editing make me a little wary.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 2, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is by far the best book for getting on Jeopardy and winning. This is the book that Secrets of the Jeopardy Champions was trying to be. My friend Jeff just used this book to get a tryout for the show and he passed the test! He swears that he only passed because of this book! Now we're just waiting to hear if he gets called to actually be on the show. Keep your fingers crossed for us!
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