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How to Greet a Dog and What to Avoid Kindle Edition

54 customer reviews

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Length: 29 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Product Details

  • File Size: 984 KB
  • Print Length: 29 pages
  • Publisher: CattleDog Publishing (September 26, 2011)
  • Publication Date: September 26, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005Q134XI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #285,367 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jackie-the-Greyhound on October 12, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
For adults who are unsure, or for teaching children, or even just as reminders, this little book is just right.

I read it on the cloud reader--which was good because it turns out the points are made by nice, colorful, easy to understand (without being preachy) cartoon drawings all contained in a mere 113 Kindle location size.

The basic points are (without just rewriting the points):

1. Don't approach dogs in cars...
2. Approach slowly and calmly...
3. Ask for permission...
4. Avoid staring at dogs head on....
5. Don't loom...
6. Avoid reaching into...
7. Avoid interacting if...
8. Touch and pet...

Super highly-recommended by a certain dog who may have snapped once (completely out of character) when her head was unexpectedly held while a face loomed over her.

JTG
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Just Peachy on October 14, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book should be shown to every child and a lot of adults. The author does a great job of describing how to approach a dog. The pictures are helpful and cute. The only thing I feel she left out was to stress that even small dogs bite. I have a small dog who loves everyone but have owned small dogs that would snap.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By MP on December 26, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a brief but expressive little book. Because so many children are dog bite victims, and many very bad bites are to the face, it's worth the time and effort to teach these concepts to every child you know.

You will find this little book to be very useful when explaining how to greet a dog in a way that children will understand. The kids should appreciate that they ought to treat dogs with the same consideration they expect for themselves. I've run into plenty of adults who need these basic lessons, too!

My obedience instructor uses many of Dr. Yin's freely available materials in her puppy kindergarten and basic obedience classes.

I also recommend that you pay attention to Dr. Yin's blog, web site, and video clips that show clearly how easy it is to teach a dog a new concept or behavior. My favorite is the one where she teaches her dog to put both front feet in a box on the floor using just treats and the word "Yes!" It took a total of about three minutes.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By luvs aussies on October 16, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
great little book. should be required reading in all elementary schools/adoption agencies/law schools.
no doubt it is advertising for the author and her other publications.
thank you dr. yin for a cute easy presentation.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca of Amazon HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 12, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
No matter how tempting it might be (Oh look at that cute little puppy!) Sophia Yin advises people to approach dogs carefully and especially not to approach a dog in a car. This book explains exactly how you should stand next to a dog or how you should sit down and let a dog come to you. The point is not to be threatening to a dog. If you wouldn't approach a person certain ways why would you think it is OK with a dog? Just imagine someone sticking their hand into your car or running up to you or looming over you in a big scary clown costume. Well the cute illustrations in this book made me laugh. I think it is possibly the cutest Kindle book I've ever read. As someone who has been attacked by a dog I would say to take this advice seriously. And in my case the dog took offense just for me looking in its direction. Pretty scary. I will use Sophia Yin's advice the next time I see a cute dog I want to pet.

~The Rebecca Review
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Liz on February 29, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read this book along with a 5th grader in my class. My students have checklists of genres they need to read, and I'm planning to encourage many students to read this book as their instructional nonfiction item. The student who read this story, as you will see from her review, does have a fear of dogs and I think she was very comforted by the advice in the story. I found the language and rules to be very approachable and understandable. The difficulty level was a little low for the average 5th grader's target reading range, but overall this was a good read. Here is my student's review.

The last book I read was Sammy Keyes and the Wedding Crasher. I picked this book to read because I am pretty scared of dogs and I wanted to learn about how to not be as afraid. I liked how there were rules that you could follow and practice before you see a dog. I even practiced them at home with my cat. I think they will help me. I gave this book four stars.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By shoppingaddict on December 26, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
in real life scenarios with real life kids, dogs, and even adults who lose their common sense over cute and fluffy creatures this is a good list of basic reminders. it is exactly what it proposes to be in the title. and phrased in a way that is easily understandable. this is a great tool for educators, shelters, dog handlers, anyone who will be taking their dog out in public should read this. Anyone presenting to the public about dogs/dog bite awareness should have this resource.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Steve Thomas on October 13, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was a little shocked when I saw how fast I was progressing through this book.

On second thought, I decided anything else would be unacceptable. Like the Ten Commandments, there are a few basic rules, like the Ten Commandments, they are easy enough to learn and obey, and like the Ten Commandments, there are harsh consequences for failing to follow the rules.

The thing is, decades ago, I was a baby photographer. It took a while for me to learn how to interact with kids, but I eventually learned how, and these were basically the rules that I evolved for dealing with them. Basically, they consist of "don't be aggressive, be familiar and friendly, and respect the kid's (or the dog's) right to set the pace."

Once I learned how, women would arrive at the studio, and gasp. Oh, they'd say, a man, or Oh, a beard, or Oh!, you wear glasses. Don't worry about it, I'd tell the mother. If you don't get upset, things will be OK. And I'd approach the mom slowly, and talk to the mom, while the baby would study me. Pretty soon, the baby would decide to peek, and I'd play peek with the baby, with the baby soon laughing. I'd offer my arms to the baby, and the baby would shrink back, and I'd pull back my arms, and cry, Aha, fooled you!, teasing the babe, and the babe would turn to see me laughing. Before you know it, the baby would be leaping into my arms.

I own a german shepherd, a 130-pound female, and since she has no hands, she inspects things with her mouth. If she gets excited, she can sometimes pinch with her mouth, and that scares people. Since I don't want to be sued, I thought perhaps this book would help me teach others how to make friends with my dog.

Well, the answer is no. This book is about keeping dogs from getting scared and hurting you on purpose.
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