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on December 3, 1998
I have memorized this book I love it so much! The young and young at heart will love Dr. Seuss's crazy rhymes and cool words (have you ever gotten a "fuzzle" for Christmas? have you ever eaten "who hash"?...but you must have been to Whoville!) This book is silly and crazy, but it also gives a very important Christmas message which I think has been very much lacking in our society today. It's so easy to get caught up in the holidays (or hating the holidays, a la Grinch), that we forget the true meaning of Christmas. I'm not only talking about religion (which is ultimately the reason for the season, but don't get me started!), but also the time we spend with family and friends. Here's one of my favourite Grinchy quotes: "He puzzled and puzzed til his puzzler was sore. Then the Grinch thought of something he hadn't before. "Maybe Christmas.." he thought "Doesn't come from a store. Maybe Christmas, perhaps, means a little bit more." Keep that in mind. Merry Grinch-mas! "Welcome Christmas, bring your cheer. Cheer to all Whos far and near. Christmas day is in our grasp, so long as we have hands to clasp. Christmas day will always be just as long as we have we. Welcome Christmas while we stand, heart to heart, and hand in hand."
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Oh, how we love the Grinch. And now we can know so much more about what makes him tick... This new anniversary edition includes the original story, but adds an essay in the back that explores Seuss' view of Christmas, the visual and conceptual evolution of the Grinch character, and the adaptation of the story into the TV special that we all know and love so well. Written by uber-Seuss-ologist Charles D. Cohen, the essay features wonderful illustrations and all sorts of groovy Grinch memorabilia... A fun look behind the scenes of one of the all-time great children's classics. Cool beans. (ReadThatAgain!)
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How The Grinch Stole Christmas is a classic tale about greed, materialism, and the kindness of man for his fellow man all wrapped up in one great big package! The illustrations are wonderful and the rhyming text impresses me. This is a story by Dr. Seuss that is so popular it was made into a Christmastime TV special; and it deserves every bit of recognition that it gets. (Note: this story is very popular; and because many, many people know it all the way through there are spoilers in this review.)

When the story begins we are introduced to the Grinch. He hates Christmas with all celebrations down in "Who-ville," a village he can see from his home on a mountain. The Grinch hates the noise, the caroling, the sharing of presents and the feast of "roast beast."

Eventually the Grinch gets an idea--he dresses up as Santa Claus and uses his dog Max for a reindeer; and this perverse take on the real Santa Claus tale is meant to strike people as ugly. The Grinch comes down from the mountain with his sled and his dog Max made up to look like a reindeer. Soon the Grinch steals all the presents, the stocking hung with care on the fireplace mantle, the roast beast, the Christmas trees--and even the firewood!

The Grinch gets quite a surprise when on Christmas day the "Whos" of "Who-ville" celebrate and rejoice anyway--without any material things to mark the holiday spirit. This shocks the Grinch and he must consider the possibility that Christmas doesn't just "come from a store."

Of course, once the Grinch learns his lesson he returns everything and there's quite a huge celebration with the Grinch leading the way as he carves the "roast beast." It's a very positive ending.

The moral of the story for our children is, of course, that Christmas DOESN'T just come from a store. The importance of Christmas with its religious significance and its message of good will toward all mankind is stressed without banging the child on the head too aggressively. The story overall makes for a fascinating experience for the children. I have many fond memories of watching this TV special and reading this book when I was a very young child.

As with many Dr. Seuss books, children can use this book on a concrete, literal level to improve their vocabulary and reading skills. Older kids will learn the importance of Christmas and the need for all mankind to respect each other and share the beauties of the world together.

I highly recommend this exceptional children's book.
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on November 1, 2000
My 9 year old took a look at the face of Jim Carey, as the movie Grinch, and said, "That's not the real Grinch!"
He's right, of course. It's hard when a book you've been reading faithfully every year is made into a movie, and you see who Hollywood gives the lead part to. (Then again, who else would anyone cast in this rubber-faced role?)
This is the original story, with the real face of the scowling, mean-spirited Grinch. That face changes from bad to worse, and then to tender when he finally "gets" the meaning of Christmas.
But before he does, children and adults will read (and reread) in delight and shock as the Grinch disguises himself as Santa. The innocent townspeople of Whoville never seem to catch on as the Grinch forces his poor dog Max to help him steal all the toys and ornaments. He's so sure that once he's done away with the material goodies, the Christmas spirit will be gone.
A wonderful story with a message we can't hear enough. Add this to a child's Christmas bookshelf, or give it to that grumpy coworker who's ba-humbuging around.
This book is the classic (accept no substitutes)!
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on November 1, 2000
My 9 year old took a look at the face of Jim Carey, as the movie Grinch, and said, "That's not the real Grinch!"
He's right, of course. It's hard when a book you've been reading faithfully every year is made into a movie, and you see who Hollywood gives the lead part to. (Then again, who else would anyone cast in this rubber-faced role?)
This is the original story, in a classy cover for the Seuss lover or favorite grandchild(ren) on someone's Christmas list. Of course, as the story tells us, material things aren't as important as the intentions behind them.
If the price seems a bit high, amazon offers another version that's a little less expensive and still has the real face of the scowling, mean-spirited Grinch.
That face changes from bad to worse, and then to tender when he finally "gets" the meaning of Christmas. But before he does, children and adults will read (and reread) in delight and shock as the Grinch disguises himself as Santa. The innocent townspeople of Whoville never seem to catch on as the Grinch forces his poor dog Max to help him steal all the toys and ornaments. He's so sure that once he's done away with the material goodies, the Christmas spirit will be gone.
A wonderful story with a message we can't hear enough. Add this deluxe edition (sure to last for another 40 years!) to a child's Christmas bookshelf, or give it to that special someone who's ba-humbuging around.
This book is the classic (accept no substitutes)!
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on October 31, 2007
This book is a treasure! The 32 pages of insightful commentary confirms Cohen as the powerhouse of Seussianna. His Grinch book brings out captivating tid bits of cool Seuss knowledge that ticklemy brain like a zany Seuss Rhyme. Cohen proves again that he's the single most authority on all things Seuss. Thanks for the 29 pages of brainy commentary packed at the end of Seuss's classic Story!!

The Secret Art of Dr. SeussThe Seuss, the Whole Seuss and Nothing But the Seuss: A Visual Biography of Theodor Seuss Geisel
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In my last Seuss-an rhyme I lied
Even though I really tried
And really bad for one completely
training to be oh so priestly
But how could I forget this story
How could it not get some glory
For the Grinch is each of us
In our cars or on the bus
We go our ways and think we're not
We really think we're very hot
But little things can mean a lot
One small voice can hit the spot
And just who are these Who's who sing?
What new learning can they bring?
Where would we be without the tale
That Christmastime will never fail
For humankind will always strive
So long as we remain alive
To capture for that briefest time
Community most real, sublime
Regardless of your race or creed
Virtue or heroic deed
Or even the most evil kind
Rarely will be left behind
For grace will work in ways most wondrous
For an event that comes most thund-rous
And, albeit, unexpected
Though, confessing, was expected
For this is a children's tale
The ending cannot make us wail
And as in true prophecy, has hope
Surely we won't want to mope
But joy surrounds us, everyone
Old as dirt and very young
And we will learn it most completely
Not obtuse and not obliquely
That love will rule the final day
And love will help us all the way
The wonderful tale by Dr. Seuss, 'How the Grinch Stole Christmas', has become such as part of the culture that it is difficult to think of Christmas without it. To be a Grinch is as understood in the common vernacular as to be a Scrooge, another literary adaptation. The adaptation for television made this a ubiquitous story, but the book is where the truly glory lies, in the story. Again, in true Seussian character, the vocabulary is small and the rhyming schemes simple, all the better to make sure that children and learning and remembering, not just language, but also imagination and creativity.
Pros
A grinch who changes, a Who who hopes
Cons
Nothing here that fails or slopes
A must-have for children of all ages.
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Maybe that's oversimplifying a bit, but the basics are the same. In this story, we have the Grinch, who hates Christmas and every year must put up with the celebration of the Whos who live in the valley below his cave. But this year things will be different. This year, he intends to do something about it. Surely the Whos will be disappointed when they wake up Christmas morning to discover that all their presents and decorations have been stolen. Or will they?

Told is classic Seuss fashion, completely in rhymes, this book appeals to kids year round. I know I insisted that it be read to me more then just in December. The fanciful illustrations, also classic Seuss, are just as engaging as this story. After all, what could be worse to kids then no Christmas? Yet there is a message here that there is more to Christmas then the commercialism we see around us. It's subtle and not expanded on greatly, but it's there none-the-less.

Surely Charles Dickens' classic tale was an influence when Dr. Seuss sat down to write this book. Both the main characters hate Christmas and miss the point, but have a revelation that shows them how important Christmas really is. Of course, the meat of the stories is completely different, so kids not ready for Dickens will love this one.

If there is such a thing as a classic picture book, this belongs in that category. Enjoyable at Christmas, or the whole year round.
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on April 10, 2010
This book will always be, in my option, the definitive book to teach children that Christmas is much more than getting presents. This story tells of an adventure of a ill spirited "grinch" who attempts to steal everything that he thinks makes up Christmas from his neighbors the whos. His short term success and ultimate failure, along with the true Christmas spirit of the whos make this book a timeless treasure. Children love the book, obviously so does Hollywood.

This book gives us a 30 page essay on Dr. Suess' concepts of Christmas. This probably won't appeal to your young kids, but older fans of this classic will certainly appreciate it. I do recommend buying this book just for that.

Darien Summers, author of The Mischievous Hare, a children's book. The Mischievous Hare
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As Hollywood prepares to unleash yet another dreary, mangled version of a classic book, I found myself sitting down to read "How the Grinch Stole Christmas" yet again.
The Grinch, for no apparent reason, REALLY hates Christmas and the Whos of Whoville love it. Angered by their holiday festivities and happiness, he plots to steal their presents and decorations, under the assumption that Christmas can't/won't exist without them. So he sets off with faithful but much-kicked canine Max to destroy Christmas. But is Christmas only presents and ornaments?
Dr. Seuss's delightfully-skewed rhymes and names are as enjoyable as ever, making the important message of Christmas infinitely more palatable than if it had been a much-regurgitated, cliched book. I admit it--at the beginning the Christmas season I tend to act Grinchish, and I felt much better after reading this book...
If you like this book, then check out the old cartoon special (though not the live-action one). "Grinch" is a treasure in kid's literature and can be enjoyed by anyone...
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