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How to Grow More Vegetables: And Fruits, Nuts, Berries, Grains and Other Crops Than You Ever Thought Possible on Less Land Than You Can Imagine Paperback – March 1, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-1580082334 ISBN-10: 1580082335 Edition: 6th

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press; 6th edition (March 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580082335
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580082334
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 8.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #576,891 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

JOHN JEAVONS is a cofounder of the group Ecology Action and the father of the modern biointensive gardening movement. He lives in Willits, California, where he has been growing more vegetables for decades.

More About the Author

JOHN JEAVONS is a cofounder of the group Ecology Action and the father of the modern biointensive gardening movement. He lives in Willits, California, where he has been growing more vegetables for decades.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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See all 25 customer reviews
The author overlooks the fact that there are no total vegetarians in nature.
L. Williams
This book is full of great, clearly explained ideas like that, with all the information you need to put them into practice yourself.
Jud Fink
THis book I would suggest to anyone that wants to learn how to produce a productive vegetable garden.
"pantherman1979"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

367 of 369 people found the following review helpful By Jud Fink on December 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
I spent a few hours reading this book and was rewarded with 7-foot high tomato plants with big flavorful fruit, beautiful herbs (a couple of sprigs of fresh rosemary were just the thing for a New Year's coq au vin I still remember fondly), beans, peas, lettuce, flowers and more, all from four 4x20 garden beds. All (organic) fertilizing is done before planting, and I only have to weed *twice* a year. If this sounds like the kind of gardening you'd like to do, then this book will show you how. (The automatic watering I came up with myself - buried soaker hoses made from recycled tires a couple of inches deep in the beds and hooked them up to a hose on a timer.)

Contrary to a couple of comments, I didn't find the book at all difficult to understand - quite the opposite. Here, try one great idea on for size:

The roots and leaves of each plant fill a circle. (The book tells you the size of that circle for just about every common garden plant, plus more than a few uncommon ones.) Space your plants so that all the circles are just touching. (You can picture what this looks like by using coins.) That way, each plant has enough room to grow and thrive, while at the same time all their roots and leaves form a "living mulch" that crowds out weeds.

This really works - as I said, I only have to weed twice a season. And how difficult was that to understand? This book is full of great, clearly explained ideas like that, with all the information you need to put them into practice yourself. And someone gave it two stars because it uses *line drawings*? Please.

The reviewer who called it a gardening Bible had it exactly right. If you're thinking of buying a gardening book, do yourself and your garden a great big favor - make it this one.
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244 of 249 people found the following review helpful By Rachel E. Watkins on November 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book was loaned to me by a friend who has used it's techniques to produce high-yield growth in his gardens. I have always wanted to have a self sufficent garden, and land for this, but have always thought I would need a number of acres to do this. I am now planning on purchasing a home with one acre and am confident that with the techniques detailed in this book, I will be able to produce good crops for home-grown organic vegetables.
There is so much information here on composting, conpanion planting, how plants and thier root systems grow and interact, how to make the garden beds, why beds and clumps are better and yield more produce than planting in rows, soil composition, garden implements and more.
There are diagrams for everything you need to know presented in such a way that it's easy to understand and implement. There is so much information here, it would be usefull to a complete beginer like me or an experienced gardner.
Happy Planting!
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86 of 92 people found the following review helpful By Cid Young on November 28, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When I first bought this book in 1988 I read it cover to cover on a cool winter evening, dreaming into the night of all the wonderful seeds I could begin to sprout....and plants that I could grow and eat. I now have the most recent edition as well, to loan out to "gardening newbies", but every year I pull out the older copy as a reference when planning & planting my spring garden. (Hence the dirty fingerprints throughout!)
The book is an excellent easy-to-read source and guide for the importance of good soil preparation as well as companion planting and planting by phases of the moon.
(By the way, the reviewer that called this book "New Age Crap" was wrong wrong wrong.)
The author takes old concepts (such as planting by lunar cycles) and encourages one to try it. I did, and am very pleased year after year with the results. I think the reviewer (HL - a self-proclaimed "technical specifications reader") who did not care for the style of the book should stick to reading and let us gardeners stick to the dirt!
May all the newbie vegetable gardeners out there be as inspired as I continue to be by this book!
Incidentally, for San Francisco Bay Area readers, the author occasionally teaches in person at Common Ground in Palo Alto (559 College Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94306 650-493-6072) A wonderful down-to-earth store where one can buy seeds "by the teaspoon" from shelves of seed jars and take informative classes. [...]
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41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Lynda Hedl on November 2, 2004
Format: Paperback
I own and have read many books on gardening. John Jeavons has put together THE TEXTBOOK for beginners and advanced gardeners alike. I like the simple illustrations of such basic activities as double digging the garden, composting, and possible layouts of the garden. At the same time, I find the tables of detailed info on each plant an excellent resource for planning my own garden. I guess that some gardeners will feel intimidated by all the info, I sure did at first, and one other reviewer seemed to as well. But I can't imagine passing up this book for that reason!
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Almarode on November 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is an amazing, overwhelming wealth of information.
I'm not sure I totally agree with all the advice - he's somewhat
anti-manure and recommends transplanting everything twice. It
mentions things like phase of the moon planting, but it's not
dogmatic about these more offbeat ideas. The real value is
the charts for the growing needs, spacing, etc. for every plant
and grain and tree, with suggested layouts and rotations; and
how it targets sustainably suppling real food for people, in
quantities needed to live on, rather than just growing the odd
vegetable for fun.
They are, I believe, in Northern CA so more appropriate for me
in Oregon than many of the Rodale and other east-coast authors.
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