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How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland's Heroic Role From the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe (The Hinges of History) Paperback – February 1, 1996


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How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland's Heroic Role From the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe (The Hinges of History) + The Gifts of the Jews: How a Tribe of Desert Nomads Changed the Way Everyone Thinks and Feels (Hinges of History) + Desire of the Everlasting Hills: The World Before and After Jesus (Hinges of History)
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Product Details

  • Series: Hinges of History (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 246 pages
  • Publisher: Anchor; 1st edition (February 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385418493
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385418492
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (447 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,159 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In this delightful and illuminating look into a crucial but little-known "hinge" of history, Thomas Cahill takes us to the "island of saints and scholars," the Ireland of St. Patrick and the Book of Kells. Here, far from the barbarian despoliation of the continent, monks and scribes laboriously, lovingly, even playfully preserved the West's written treasury. When stability returned in Europe, these Irish scholars were instrumental in spreading learning, becoming not only the conservators of civilization, but also the shapers of the medieval mind, putting their unique stamp on Western culture.

From Publishers Weekly

An account of the pivotal role played by Irish monks in transcribing and preserving Classical civilization during the Dark Ages.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Thomas Cahill, former director of religious publishing at Doubleday, is the bestselling author of the Hinges of History series.

Customer Reviews

This is a very interesting book-- even if you're not interested in Irish History (or even History period!)
R. Scully
Thomas Cahill's "How the Irish Saved Civilization..." is the kind of written history that was born in the oral tradition.
Susan Gill
The title of the book for one thing is one of the things that make you want to instantly pick up the book.
Joshua Lee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

213 of 252 people found the following review helpful By John B. Maggiore on April 13, 2001
Format: Audio Cassette
The title of this book is misleading, though not inaccurate. For some reason I assumed the title to be tongue-in-cheek. Some vague kind of Irish humor. I also assumed that the Irish in question were the contemporary Irish, perhaps even Irish Americans. I was pleasantly surprised to be completely wrong. I usually listen to tapes of books that I am mildly interested in and don't want to spend the time and effort to read. This one far exceeded my initial casual interest. It was a joy to listen to and worth sitting down with in print form. The book is a piece of serious history. It focuses on the transition in Europe between the fall of Rome and the early Middle Ages. The story is literally how Irish clerics saved the books and teachings of classical Western civilization, then re-introduced them to Europe after the fall. This is not only a period in history that I am not especially familiar with - I genuinely don't think there's much writing on it (at least not popular historical writing, like this book). The author makes a point that this particular story - of how, well, the Irish saved civilization, is especially downplayed or ignored in part due to who writes most of the history books (such as the English). So I learned quite a bit. Cahill is a great storyteller. I imagine that this will be enjoyable even for people without a particular attraction to history, and certainly to people with no particular interest in Irish history. Again, this is a book worth getting and reading in print form, however the audio version has one advantage - the narration by Donal Donnelly. His rich voice and well-timed delivery was a joy to listen to and kept me driving the long way home so I could hear more of the tape.
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60 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Susan Gill on January 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
Thomas Cahill's "How the Irish Saved Civilization..." is the kind of written history that was born in the oral tradition. This is a book not only scholarly in content, but eminently readable by all. Certainly, it has become a monument to the Irish monks who one can see painstakingly copying the ancient books of the Greeks for posterity. Cahill's recounting of Patrick, Ireland's patron saint, brings this Roman slave's life to the people without compromising his inherent holiness. Thomas Cahill does great honor to his ancestors with his book, a must read for anyone interested in the history of Western Civilization.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 1, 1998
Format: Paperback
This was not as compelling or thoughtful as this subject deserved. It seems to be written (or transscribed) with the audiotape in mind. Cahill's statement in the preface that this subject (How the Irish Saved...) has not been addressed before is wrong. I recommend James Charles Roy's Islands of Storm. This is an earlier book and does a far better job of explaining this subject. In addition it adds far more Irish geography and meanderings about Irish religious development and influences. At 280 pages a far more worthwhile and enjoyable read. In fact after reading Cahill's, I immediately re-read Roy's.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Michael E. Bass on May 29, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The eyebrow-raising title pretty well says it all for this book, which presents, in a popular format, the rich heritage and influence of Irish Christianity upon the whole of Western Europe in the early Middle Ages. (Although the citizens of the Eastern Roman Empire would have laughed at the notion that their civilization was in any sense "saved" by the Irish!). The author does a creditable job of casting light on a part of Western history that often gets short shrift in the history books: how the Irish monks of the 6th and 7th centuries "jump-started" literacy and learning during the darkest part of the Dark Ages. A very informative and enjoyable read!
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By James on August 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
I first read this book a few years ago and then again recently. While it is written in an easy way and is a quick read I find that Cahill is not good at presenting recent scholarship or indeed in backing up what he is saying with references. Some of his "facts" are actually mythology but he does not state this and there is no clear line between actual Irish history and myth. In this he does a disservice to Irish scholars. I recommend that readers also read "In Search of Ancient Ireland" the more recent publication that gives a better overview of the same period in Irish history and with greater clarity and detail.
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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By "mikilynn" on October 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is a fascinating and very readable account of an important piece of history. Not only is it information that is omitted in the standard text books, but it is presented in a way that makes you personally involved in the lives and contributions of such men as Saint Patrick. These are living, breathing pages which give dignity and value to a people and a culture that has long been characatured or dismissed. I literally laughed and sighed aloud. This is a must-read for anyone of Irish descent and a very enjoyable look at western culture for anyone else.
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228 of 282 people found the following review helpful By Slavic Critic on May 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
To all who have read this malarkey, and for those who intend to, I have a suggestion. First, read all the articles by Tim Callahan of Skeptic magazine. He is an authentic scholar who specializes in debunking revisionism and bigotry. Since he like Mr. Cahill is Irish the 3-5 star reviewers will not be able to condemn him for being anti-Irish. He makes certain, unlike Cahill that he has a mountain of proof-evidence to verify his thesis. I was so impressed with his methods that it truly surprised me that some people actually fell for this book. In fact he used every point that the 1-2 star reviewers mentioned, and more. I agree with him that the entire "Hinges Of History Series" largely lacks any in depth research. The first 3 chapters of this book is devoted to rehashing what most of us learned in grade school. The next 2 chapters are clearly the authors reinterpretations of the period. The rest of the book felt padded. What does Plato have to do with the title, or premise? Where are the footnotes and sources? That makes everything dubious at best. Also, Cahill did make Archie Bunker type remarks about other groups that have no place in our society, except in a very tasteless jokebook. Read Callahan first, or in place of this rusty fiction.
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