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How to Live With a Curse


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Audio CD, April 18, 2006
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 18, 2006)
  • Original Release Date: 2006
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Abacus
  • ASIN: B000ERU5CM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #79,025 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. A Reason to Believe
2. It's Beautiful (Once You're out Here)
3. We Say
4. Fear and Love
5. The Trouble with Being Born
6. Future History of the Broken Hearted
7. Grace
8. You Made It Look So Easy
9. Lost Days
10. We'll Sort This Out Right Now
11. Sean
12. Kill My Darlings

Editorial Reviews

How to Live With A Curse is Stavesacre's 5th full length release and Abacus debut. Produced by Matt Hyde (Sum41, No Doubt), How to Live With A Curse is the band's finest release from start to finish.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 12 customer reviews
Meaningful thoughtful lyrics by very talented rock musicians.
Kerry Colling
With it's mix of post punk hardcore mixed with an almost emoish sound, though never as sissy as straight up emo bands, it was a great cohesive whole.
Brent E. Johnson
This album stands out, in my opinion, as being either their best or second best after their debut.
Josh

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By middleclassbuzz on April 19, 2006
Format: Audio CD
"How to Live with a Curse" is the Stavesacre record we've all been waiting for.

While this album could be described as a deft combination of the things Stavesacre has done best on each of their previous albums, that would be a severe understatement. This is anything but business as usual.

When you listen to "How to Live with a Curse", you hear the current lineup finding their sound and their voice. You hear the answer to a question that I know many have been thinking but have been afraid to ask: "Where does this band fit in music today?" Most importantly, us longtime fans get to hear the record that we have been waiting for since the departure of Jeff Bellew, the band's original guitarist and the creative force behind the unique sound of the first two records. As much as I loved Speakeasy, it lacked the edge and experimental sound that made Stavesacre so hard to categorize. The band seemed to ease into the comfort of being just another hard-rock act. The music got even less challenging on their self-titled release, the band's fourth proper full-length, on Nitro Records. But all along, I knew that another Stavesacre existed. And the one I envisioned is the one we hear now, and everything else is a thing of the past.

To start things off, we hear Mark Salomon's distinct voice crying out, I'm not looking for a reason to believe. There could be no more appropriate line to open a Stavesacre record, because this is where the strength of his song writing has always been. As for why he's not looking for a reason to believe, well, that's territory that's already been charted (if this is unfamiliar to you, go back and listen to the band's first four records). Rather, Salomon's new challenge lies in seeing it through, sticking it out when times get tough.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A. Heuer on June 29, 2006
Format: Audio CD
This CD has been out for over two months now and I feel ready to write a review. Like all Stavescare records (except Speakeasy), this one has taken me awhile to wrap my ears around. Don't get me wrong: I knew I liked it from the beginning, but it takes time with each record to figure out where it fits in their catalogue.

After the return to form that was the Bull Takes Fighter EP, fans were justifiably hopeful for a record that ranks up there with the first three - Friction, Absolutes and Speakeasy. This album delivers, even if we do find a more polished pop-rock sound in places.

The first half of the CD seems especially written for the pop music crowd that can handle a catchy rock song now and again. It's these first five songs that took the longest to appreciate. Why? Because they seem written with an agenda - to draw in even the most casual of listeners. Over time, however, the catchiness serves its purpose well; you'll find yorself wanting to hear 'em all again and again. This is no more evident than on the confident masterpiece that is Fear And Love. Sure, it's all out pop-rock, but it's such a blast to listen to that you can't help admire Stavesacre for writing and recording it.

Midway through the album, there is a shift. Beginning with Future History Of The Brokenhearted, the admired Stavesacre of old really emerges. The last half of the album finds the band writing with no intended audience or purpose other than to craft cool, diverse songs. The aforementioned Future History is as heavy as anything the band has ever done. The tender Grace follows, and captures the beauty of Mark's voice; it will bring a tear to your eye. You Made It Look So Easy is reminiscent of Wither/Ascend - a slow, brooding track that explodes at the end.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Christopher S. Revell on April 2, 2007
Format: Audio CD
We all know Mark best from his days in the Christian/crossover band, The Crucified. Years later his lyrics still continue to inspire me. If your a fan of the Crucified, you know that the difference between The Crucified and Stavesacre is that they slowed things down a bit. But to me, it still delivers that hardcore punch, but in the same vein as bands such as Quicksand. Its defiently their finest effort to date in my opinion, and one album not to be missed!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By mr z on May 12, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I don't know how many of you picked up the Bull Takes Fighter EP, but after listening to that I expected Stavesacre's new album to be one of their best efforts yet. I was more than satisfied with How To Live With A Curse. While I was not surprised at the lyrical content of songs like It's Beautiful Once You're Out Here, Kill My Darlings and The Trouble With Being Born, I was very surprised to hear Mark take on politics in We Say. At first I was a little disappointed, feeling that he jumped on the bandwagon so to speak. However, Mark's lyrics have always been sincere and hard hitting so I eventually let of the disappointment and credited him with much deserved props for venturing into that controversial territory. I really like the Beach Boys feel of Fear and Love...listen to Kokomo and you will hear what I am hearing. I'm not sure I can say this album is better than Absolutes; since Colt .45, Wither/Ascend, and Aquiesce are on that album; but it definitely comes in a close tie. Highlights here are the aforementioned songs and the spotlight falls on The Trouble With Being Born. Excellent Cd. Buy it and enjoy.
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Even better than Speakeasy
I consider Speakeasy their strongest batch of material, but their entire career is flecked with moments of brilliance (even on the much-maligned Self-titled album). How to Live With a Curse has strong music, but I'm still trying to figure out quite how it will grow on me. While their other albums... Read More
Apr 6, 2006 by A. Fields |  See all 4 posts
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