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How to Love an American Man: A True Story Paperback – August 16, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (August 16, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061997390
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061997396
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #336,781 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Gasbarre’s reflections should resonate with many readers…including those who enjoyed Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat, Pray, Love (Booklist)

“A beautifully written, heartfelt gem. Disguised as a romance, it is actually a story of familial bonds, personal growth and faith.” (Lisa Oz, New York Times bestselling author and radio host)

“Gasbarre writes with style, grace and plenty of humor, maintaining a perfect balance. Hers is a genuine quest. Up close and personal, here is a bright light on the road to Love” (Alphie McCourt)

The author’s treatment of the central conflict that drives the book-the quintessentially modern female quandary of finding lasting love while staying true to personal ambitions-comes across with an integrity and veracity women readers will undoubtedly appreciate…Chick-lit-alicious.” (Kirkus Reviews)

Kristine Gasbarre is a modern-day Jane Austen ... with sparkling wit, this spunky heroine faces modern women’s search for love..That’s where her grandmother comes in, gently schooling her in the art of courtship and, ultimately, identity. A page-turner that leaves you guessing until the very end.” (Jean Twenge, Ph.D., author of Generation Me and co-author of The Narcissism Epidemic)

“How to Love an American Man is fresh, funny, and original. Kristine Gasbarre has written a love story without borders. Dive in and enjoy!” (Adriana TrigianiAdriana TrigianiAdriana TrigianiAdriana TrigianiAdriana TrigianiAdriana TrigianiAdriana Trigiani)

From the Back Cover

An endearing and unforgettable memoir of love, self-discovery, and enduring, old-fashioned values

Kristine Gasbarre made a New York career of dating driven, inaccessible men. When she realizes her love life will never result in happiness if she continues on the same path, she makes a big decision—relocating to Italy to discover her roots and find out what defines her adoring grandpa. But upon receiving the news of his sudden passing, she is lured away.

With nowhere left to go, Krissy returns to her small hometown for the first time in a decade to help care for her grandmother—a refined, private matriarch suf?fering from early dementia along with the loss of her husband. In her reluctant agreement to share the nearly lost love stories and transformative lessons from her rich sixty-year marriage, Krissy’s grandma becomes the one of?fering comfort as she coaches her granddaughter through the fear of loving. Grandma’s unapologetic femininity and secret giving spirit opens Krissy’s eyes about relationships, teaching her the single most important requisite for loving a man: first a woman has to learn the power of her own inner beauty.

Customer Reviews

She writes from her heart and I found that very refreshing.
Stella
The story just made me smile every single time I picked up the book.
Pen Name
I found the allusions and references in the novel very sophomoric.
ltc

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 35 people found the following review helpful By ltc on September 18, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
I had to read this book for book club and I have to say it is definitely not worth your time. While the language itself was lovely, the overall message and theme was immature and not very well conceived. I kept hoping it would get better but it never did. It was way longer than it needed to be and repeated the same issue over and over again. You wanted to bang your head against the wall after she KEPT pointing out her heart ache, then in case you didn't get the memo she actually wrote something along the lines of "I had a broken heart." I found the allusions and references in the novel very sophomoric.

Also, the connection she was trying to make of her grandmother grieving over her grandfather's death comparable to her break up was unfathomable and self absorbed. There was no real crescendo or movement in the book- it was like one long magazine article from Cosmo. The best way I can describe the book is a glorified "what I did last summer" essay mixed with a self help book, written by someone without expertise.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dawn on November 2, 2011
Format: Paperback
One of the most enjoyable reads in a long time. Krissy Gasbarre takes pen and paper and makes you feel a part of her world. Refreshing insight into the mind of a member of the older generation and proof that love and respect still exist in families.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By anna on November 2, 2011
Format: Paperback
I loved this book! A must read for all women especially. Not only is it filled with wonderful advice, it also has a great story. I couldn't wait to see how it ended. Trust me- you will love this book!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kris Irvin on September 3, 2012
Format: Paperback
Here's the problem I found with this book: the description/synopsis makes it sound AWESOME! And then you get into it, and you realize, it's not awesome.

Before I get into the bad about this book, I do want to say that Kristine's writing in the beginning was great. The first 30 pages were hard for me to read because they were so emotional. Kristine did a great job there. But after those first 30 pages...

It's supposed to be about the lessons Kristine learns from her grandmother, right? And about her own grandparents' love and their relationship and how it developed. So I was expecting details. Less of "Grandma explained to me why they loved each other." I would have really liked to read actual stories - the Grandma's dialogue was almost nonexistent in this book.

That was another one of my issues. There's very little dialogue. It's mostly Kristine explaining what happened or what was going on, and in the end it came off like I read a summary about a book instead of a book. She learns all of one lesson from her grandma, and it is repeated over and over again throughout the book to the point where it gets really annoying. And it's nothing new or groundbreaking (but I won't review that part since it could be considered a spoiler.)

I did not think Kristine's relationship with her grandma was super heartwarming. Sure, she drives her grandma around and takes her to lunch. But she appears to be annoyed about it the entire time. At some points she appears to treat her grandma like an inconvenience.

I also thought Kristine's relationships with Chris and with Tucker were total crap. Her fling with Tucker seemed gross and unreal to me from the beginning - I didn't understand the attraction there at all. And Chris was a real...jerk.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By BB on March 20, 2012
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be, as other reviewers have stated, extremely sophomoric and self absorbed. I found myself repeatedly cringing when reading about the way this dreamy doctor behaved and treated the author not to mention the way she justified it and went back for more. To me, tone of this relationship came across as oppressively chauvinistic, condescending and diminishing. No woman should let a man treat her this way, American or otherwise. Disappointing!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Katana Rogue on September 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book had great reviews and successfully seemed to convey there was some new information to be had from our older generation. This is definitely more of memoir piece than "How to Get a Guy" type book. I zoomed through it, wondering "Does she get the guy?" Most of the time I found myself annoyed and frustrated with the author's approach of circling this super passive guy like a vulture for years until he finally makes a move. UGH!

While I think it's wonderful and delightful to know how to love yourself, make a life for yourself, and love truly and honestly (not just for "What's in it for me?") but on the same note, advice from the lovely Grandma seems to be: let the guy off the hook, let him be the chase-e instead of the chaser, do everything in your power to love and support him but expect nothing in return (which seems like for the most part, what she got -- unless you count the offer of letting her use his car while he's away). Befriending a great white shark would be easier than landing a man like the Doc.

Does my annoyed response to its content make this a bad book? Absolutely not. The writing is fresh, the story involving and thoughtful. Maybe your experiences with men and life will allow you to respond differently. :)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kate Chopin VINE VOICE on August 29, 2011
Format: Paperback
Kristine Gasbarre writes a refreshing memoir about love with help from her charming Grandmother Glo, who has just lost her husband. Kristine's own dating life has left her teary and frustrated, which gives her a chance to see her grandparent's relationship with new eyes. She listens when her Grandma talks about the kind of woman a strong man needs, and how her own marriage required courage and patience.

The image Grandma Glo creates is seductively vintage: discreet, feminine women and dapper, strong men.

Kristine takes all her Grandma's words to heart, while trying to reconcile them with her modern life. And with the mysterious doctor she dated, then worked for, but who is building a practice in Asia.

How to Love an American Man is a charming, wise read that appealed to me, because my Grandmother and Great Aunt were the delicate, feminine wives of dashing men, so I could immediately relate. I could also relate to Kristine's struggle to reconcile that world with the modern world of dating.

I absolutely adored & highly recommend. And, I have fingers crossed for a sequel!

In retrospect, this book reminds me of Laura Munson's memoir This is Not the Story You Think It Is: A Season of Unlikely Happiness. Just thought I'd add that in, if you want to see how courage & patience might play out in a marriage.
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