Customer Reviews


131 Reviews
5 star:
 (89)
4 star:
 (31)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Restoration on DVD
This movie is half a century old and followed The Robe as the second Cinemascope feature. It's visually beautiful in the DVD widescreen version, evoking the thrill of first seeing Cinemascope in 1953 (which I'm old enough to remember). Though the story and humor are extremely dated and so many of its stars are now dead, the photography and sound are both so...
Published on October 6, 2003 by Louis Barbarelli

versus
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars How to Marry A Millionaire--a critical review of the Remastered version
First of all, this movie is still hysterical. It is a work of art. Although Marilyn got top billing, she's clearly out-performed by both Lauren Bacall and Betty Grable.

Let me, for a brief moment talk about the "Diamond Collection" version of How To Marry A Millionaire. When you think of remastering, especially older films made on Cineascope or Technicolor,...
Published on August 27, 2007 by Andre Lawrence


‹ Previous | 1 214 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Restoration on DVD, October 6, 2003
By 
Louis Barbarelli (San Francisco, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: How to Marry a Millionaire (DVD)
This movie is half a century old and followed The Robe as the second Cinemascope feature. It's visually beautiful in the DVD widescreen version, evoking the thrill of first seeing Cinemascope in 1953 (which I'm old enough to remember). Though the story and humor are extremely dated and so many of its stars are now dead, the photography and sound are both so breathtakingly clear and beautiful, it makes one realize how advanced the technical side of filmmaking was that long ago. It's amazing how cinematographers of that day were able to adapt so quickly to the much wider screen and take full advantage of its sweep even during scenes filmed in close quarters, such as those on the airliner (which was a propeller plane, by the way). It's true that Lauren Bacall, though lovely in the film, looks much older than the "25" she's supposed to be. (I saw Ms. Bacall in person pitching her bio at a bookstore 45 years later and she looked un-surgically young and beautiful, so go figure.) While the movie is not great in terms of content or performances, it's worthwhile because it's a beautifully restored piece of movie history that recaptures a more innocent (?) age and preserves an important part of the Monroe legend.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars classic Marilyn, August 7, 2002
By 
Byron Kolln (the corner where Broadway meets Hollywood) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: How to Marry a Millionaire (DVD)
HOW TO MARRY A MILLIONAIRE was the first non-musical comedy to be released in the CinemaScope ratio. The film was released in 1953, which proved to be Monroe's breakthrough, watershed year, with the success of MILLIONAIRE, GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES and NIAGARA cementing her place as one of the top box-office attractions of 1953.
MILLIONAIRE is one of Monroe's most delightful offerings. She plays the visually-challenged Pola, who, along with Chotzi (Lauren Bacall - KEY LARGO, THE BIG SLEEP) and 'Loco' (Betty Grable - MOTHER WORE TIGHTS) rents a Manhattan penthouse in the hopes of snagging rich husbands.
Of course, Fate often hands you things totally unexpected, and soon the girls realise that money can't be a substitute for happiness. There are plenty of pin-sharp observations about the opposite sex, a good 50-odd years before "Sex and the City" decided to make a whole TV show about women in the Big Apple.
Marilyn, Lauren and Betty make a colorful trio, and the CinemaSope picture is indeed a treat to the eyes.
The DVD includes restoration comparisons and trailers. Available separately or as part of the Marilyn Monroe Diamond Collection.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Whimsical comedy starring 3 gorgeous gals, May 5, 2005
By 
Cory D. Slipman (Rockville Centre, N.Y.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Lauren Bacall, Betty Grable and Marilyn Monroe star in a Broadway play adaptation, as three New York models who together rent a Sutton Place apartment in order to attract rich husbands. Their plan appears to go awry when after a few months they are forced to sell the furniture in the lavishly appointed pad for living expenses.

The girls fortunes appear to turn when Bacall meets elderly Texas cattle baron J.D. Hanley played by the debonair William Powell. Grable gets lured to Maine by wealthy but married Fred Clark but winds up falling for and marrying penniless forest ranger Rory Calhoun. The visually challenged but super sexy Monroe winds up on the wrong plane when going to meet her prospective beau in Atlantic City. She winds up enamored with and marrying tax cheat and previous owner of their apartment David Wayne, who is equally blind.

Throughout the film Bacall is pursued by a Tom Brookman played by Cameron Mitchell. She dismisses him as being a poor gas station attendant. Bacall and Powell are all set to be married but at the last moment she can't go through with it. Mitchell, who Bacall really cares for, stands in for Powell and marries her. They are all shocked when they learn that Mitchell is actually worth 200 million.

The gals have their plans dashed but wind up marrying for the right reason...........LOVE.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Second Cinemascope film and Monroe's 20th, September 13, 2003
Set mostly in the urban jungle of New York, How To Marry A Millionaire was Marilyn Monroe's 20th film, and despite her sharing starring roles with veterans Lauren Bacall and Betty Grable, she evolved more compared to her previous hit, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.
Schotzie Page (Bacall), Pola Debevoise (Monroe), and Loco Dempsey (Grable) are three models who live in an expensive penthouse apartment. Their master plan, engineered by Schotzie, is to snag classy-looking people who wear neckties and to get nobody under six figures a year. The apartment is to keep up appearances. Appearances? Within three months, DISappearances is what happens, especially to the furniture.
The men they meet are a mixed bag. Tom Brookman likes Schotzie, but with the way he dresses, which isn't that bad, she thinks he's a common gas pump jockey. J.D. Handley is a middle-aged widowed Texan millionaire who's charming and polite in a smooth but humble way. Schotzie falls for him. Waldo Brewster is an uptight square who's married and complains about his family, but that doesn't stop him from snagging Loco. The two deserve each other, as he bellyaches while she whines. Pola ends up with J. Stewart Merrill, who's quite the fashion victim with that jewelled eyepatch of his.
The fashion show segment is a highlight, seeing the fashions of the 1950's. Of the three, Pola's red outfit is striking. And of the dreams the three have, Loco's is the funniest compared to the other two's.
As for the women trio, Lauren Bacall (Schotzie), Marilyn Monroe (Pola), and Betty Grable (Loco) do well, though Bacall is the character we see struggling to overcome her pride and thus the most interesting one. Monroe plays the nearsighted Pola with laughs, as we see her bumping into things when she refuses to wear her glasses in front of men. She's the most lovable of the three. In fact, her scene with David Wayne aboard the plane is my favourite in the whole movie. And actually, she does look cool with glasses.
Speaking of which, this was Wayne's fourth and last film with Monroe. He plays Freddie Denmark, the owner of the apartment the trio are living in. Two other stars deserve honorable mention. It's quite a sight to see the 50's blonde beauty queen starring opposite her predecessor of the 1940's, Betty Grable, who in a modelling sequence, briefly strikes a pose reminiscent of her famous pinup. And William Powell (Handley) in his penultimate film plays his role with a quiet dignity of a man in his years looking for emotional fulfillment.
A film injoke occurs when Schotzie says she likes older men, listing Roosevelt, Churchill, and "whatsisname in African Queen" The joke is that Lauren Bacall IS married to Humphrey Bogart. Another is when Loco hears the radio and thinks Harry James is playing. James was of course Betty Grable's husband at the time.
There are two Movietone newsreels here, one for the premiere of this movie, the other for the sneak preview of The Seven Year Itch.
This remake of The Greeks Had A Word For Them was the second movie filmed in CinemaScope, the new 2.35:1 widescreen process pioneered by Henri Chretien, the first one being The Robe. Hopefully, Chretien got to see this movie before his death in 1956. The opening number "Street Scene" is a six-minute orchestral prelude that served no other purpose than to show off stereophonic sound.
This is a slightly better gold-digging manhunter movie than Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, as the message comes through that money doesn't necessarily buy you happiness, even though it doesn't automatically depress one either. However, Handley says it best when he says "there's only one cure for loneliness--human companionship."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Innocent years, November 14, 2004
This review is from: How to Marry a Millionaire (DVD)
HOW TO MARRY A MILLIONAIRE was made in the "innocent" years before movies became cheap and sensationalized. If it were made today, well, I'd hate to think how it would be made. Nothing and no one could beat the three stars of yersteryear. Marilyn, Betty and Lauran were one of a kind and each has a great scene of their own. Together they are really delightful. It's a shame they didn't share more scenes. The Fox look in those days was well...quite wonderful as well as a nice background score. Does the picture hold up today. Yes, but barely. It's just too innocent and clean fun. That's not for todays audiences. Thank God we have DVD. These memories down nostalgia can last forever. The DVD is clear and sharp with nice stereo sound. Too bad the extras weren't better. Someone should have given a commentary. Miss Bacall would have been an excellent choice. Would have been nice to hear how the filming went, how certain shots were established and what scenes were cut from the final print. I think she's the lone survivor who had anything to do with the film, at least as of this date. This is a must see for Marilyn fans as this is my second favorites of her films.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Review of How to Marry a Millionarre, December 31, 1999
By A Customer
How To Marry A Millionarre is a movie about three fashion models who rent an expensive Manhattan apartment in hopes of marrying a millionarre. Marilyn Monroe, Lauren Bacall, and Betty Grable star as Pola, Shatze, and Loco in this romantic comedy that has delighted movie watchers for decades. The girls don't meet very many millionarre's but they do meet plenty of other men who they assume to be rich. The movie moves through a hilarious series of twists and turns as the women realise marrying a millionarre is not an easy task. The movie co-stars William Powell, David Wayne, Rory Calhoun, Cameron Mitchell, Fred Clark, and Alex D'Arcy as the various suitors. I adored this movie not only because it was humerous but because it had a real plot and meaning unlike many of today's comedies. The charactors were real and believable and the end of the movie made me feel wonderful inside. The ending is a happy one for all the charactors and will delight moviewatchers of all ages. This movie is a viewing treat for the entire family. I would recommend it to anyone who is in want of a good laugh. Happy viewing! If you enjoyed this movie you might also enjoy Frank Capra's It Happended One Night with Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert or Bringing Up Baby with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, February 22, 2000
By 
James A. White (Edmonton, Alberta) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This film, remade several times and turned into a short-lived television series starring Barbara Eden, is truly a wonderful film. Monroe, although she didn't want to wear the glasses required for the part, gives a wonderful performance as Pola, who, without her glasses, can't see her own hand in front of her face. Monroe really proves her comic talent in this film.
Bacall plays Schatzie, the brains behind the gold-digger plot. She is a first in her first major comedy. In fact, with this film, she opened up a whole new career for herself.
Grable, in her first non-musical role in years, plays, Loco, who brings the men back to the Sutton House penthouse. Although she had few comic lines, she played those she did receive to perfection. It was the last movie she made under contract with Twentieth Century Fox after a long starring career beginning in 1940. In fact, she only made two more films after this one.
Monroe, who was being groomed to take Grable's position as top glamour girl of the Twentieth Century Fox lot, was purposely teamed up with Grable in hopes of fireworks between the two, which would boost tickey sales. Studio bosses were foiled, however, when the two hit it off immediately and became fast friends who visited each other often and always had a kind word to say about the other.
All in all, a very enjoyable movie to be watched over and over again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars High Society Fun, July 26, 2001
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: How to Marry a Millionaire (DVD)
Lauren Bacall, Marilyn Monroe & Betty Grable are highly entertaining in this tale of models who set out to land a millionaire. Not having any of their own money, they come up with some off the wall schemes to live the lifestyle they are dressed for! All 3 are gorgeous and funny to watch. Each does a great job of playing the quirkiness of their characters. This is a timeless classic that's as appealing today as it was in it's day. A great girly movie. Lauren Bacall has a flair for humor that is delightful to watch.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to Marry a Millionaire, November 12, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: How to Marry a Millionaire [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
The quality of the Blu-Ray is excellant. You notice the beautiful colors though not as vibrant as the Diamonds are a Girls best friend Blu-Ray. This is an excellant movie. Becall is the star in this movie even though Monroe steals several scenes. In this movie you can see the transition from Blonde Bombshell Betty Grable to the younger Monroe, I think it's evolution. Overall the film is witty and funny. Enjoyable if you are a fan on the classics and Monroe.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Monroe, Grable, Bacall show us "How To Marry A Millionaire", February 6, 2002
By 
Phillip C Mackey (Webster, TX United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: How to Marry a Millionaire (DVD)
"How To Marry A Millionaire", produced in 1953 by 20th Century Fox, was the original vehicle for introducing Fox's revolutionary Cinemascope presentation to the public (however, "The Robe" would be the first CinemaScope film actually released) and it showcased a number of Fox's established and rising stars.
The main body of the movie follows the lives of three New York models (played by Marilyn Monroe, Betty Grable, and Lauren Bacall) in their pursuit of luxury and ease through matrimony. Bacall is the driving force of this team effort, arranging for for them to live in a luxury flat, laying down the ground rules, and singlehandedly maintaining the facade of a sophiscated livestyle. However, Bacall's character tends to judge others by their apparent sophistication. Monroe and Grable characters are less mercenary than Bacall and each has a small character flaw that sometimes leads them astray. Monroe has poor eyesight but refuses to wear her glasses in public which leads to the predictable bumping into people and objects. Grable, on the other hand, is somewhat scatterbrained, usually leading her to miscontrue statements made to her. After initially working together, each character goes into her own vignette, highlighting her path to love, and then they meet up again at the end where of course each of their paths ends in a manner different than the one they had imagined.
Considering the mostly lightweight script, the acting is very good on the whole. Although many viewers today would see the movie to watch Marilyn Monroe, it is Lauren Bacall and Betty Grable who give the better performances. Bacall is excellent in her debut in a comedy role and Grable is an absolute delight, dispensing a sometimes skewed view of life that often finds its mark. The supporting cast is also quite excellent, in particular the performances by William Powell, David Wayne, and Cameron Mitchell.
There are a number of things in the film that may confuse or at least put off today's audiences. The movie opens with a orchestra playing a composition by Alfred Neuman (who is seen conducting) and then shows a number of panoramic shots throughout the film. It is important to remember that the biggest star of this movie was suppose to be the new Cinemascope presentation and Fox's new High Fidelity sound system. While these scenes wowwed audiences in theaters during the film's initial release, watching the same scenes from a DVD widescreen version on a television set greatly lessens their impact.
Nonetheless, if you like the movies of the fifties or a fan of of any of the three principal actors, "How To Marry A Millionaire" should be one to add to your collection. Today's audiences will find the story a dated one but much of the humor will translates well to the present. This is a very enjoyable movie.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 214 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

How to Marry a Millionaire [Blu-ray]
How to Marry a Millionaire [Blu-ray] by Monroe (Blu-ray - 2012)
$19.99 $12.93
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.