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How to Mend Your Broken Heart: Overcome Emotional Pain at the End of a Relationship Paperback – June 28, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Three Rivers Press (June 28, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400054044
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400054046
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #221,530 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Over the past twenty years, Paul McKenna, Ph.D. has helped millions of people successfully lose weight, quit smoking, overcome insomnia, eliminate stress, and increase self-confidence. He is Britain's bestselling non-fiction author, having sold 3 million books in 3 years, and his TV shows and live appearances have been watched and attended by hundreds of millions of people in 42 countries around the world. Paul has famously worked his unique brand of personal transformation with Hollywood movie stars, Olympic gold medallists, rock stars, top business achievers, and royalty. He has consistently astounded his audiences and clients by proving how small changes in people's lives can yield huge results, whether it's curing someone of a lifelong phobia, an addiction or clearing up deep-seated issues in a matter of days... Now, it's your turn! --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1: What is heartbreak?

Heartbreak is a very strange distress. It is exquisitely painful, and yet we cannot find an injury on our body. It is like one big emotional pain but it also seems to spark off hundreds of other emotions. We hate the feeling of heartbreak, and yet we find ourselves compelled to go over and over memories, ideas or fantasies which make the feeling worse. What is going on?

I can remember a relationship that ended after two years. Emotionally it fizzled out, so neither I nor my ex felt heartbroken. However, directly afterwards I had another relationship that lasted only four months but completely wrecked me because I had believed I would be with that girl forever. She used to talk about marriage, and at the time she probably meant it. I created a future

in my imagination where we were a happy couple with a passionate romance and an exciting social life. I thought about what our kids might look like. All this thinking and fantasizing built up a strong network of neural pathways in my brain. As far as my nervous system was concerned, I was already married to her. When I found out she was two-timing me, in an instant my dreams and ideas seemed ridiculous. Added to all my lovely future fantasies was a huge negative feeling: Cancelled. The meaning of the pictures in my head flipped. All I could see was her in bed with another guy and think what a fool I had been. As I lay awake going over and over why this had happened, I was reinforcing how sad I felt and what a loser I must be. I felt terrible, and then even worse because I didn't know if the feeling would ever end.

One day I said to myself, "This is ridiculous! I've got to stop!" But the thoughts wouldn't stop. I didn't want to think about her, but I couldn't help it. I realized that I wasn't in charge of my own brain. I was powerless while it buzzed away. This was one of the experiences that led me eventually into writing this book. I wanted to get my mind on my side, instead of having it keep me awake at night.

When an important love relationship ends, a range of different responses is triggered. We feel loss and pain. Our normal ways of thinking about the world are disrupted. Our balance is upset, and our feelings change from one minute to the next. We pine for our ex-lover, then we are overwhelmed with anger at them. One minute we are desperate to see them, the next we can't bear to have anyone mention their name. This volatility and confusion add to the misery.

Heartbreak is caused by the end of a relationship. It can also be caused when we fail to get a relationship we fervently desire. It can even happen slowly when we realize that we are in a relationship from which all the love has gone. However it happens, after the shock, it takes some time for reality to sink in. Then we experience a welter of feelings. We can be angry, sad, devastated, despairing, distraught, desperate, remorseful, regretful, ashamed, embarrassed. The emotional bombardment is overwhelming.

In the long term, we have a natural way of dealing with these feelings. We have an emotional mechanism that allows us to recover from losses and from pain. If we didn't have it, the whole world would be in mourning forever! Bereavement, parting and suffering are unavoidable parts of our life experience. The natural way we recover is by grieving.

How grief heals

Grieving is a specific process by which we gradually let go of our attachment to the people (or places or things or even possibilities) we have lost. Of course, in the first shock of heartbreak it is not much comfort to be told that things will improve in time. We might not be ready for our feelings to improve—part of us might not even have accepted what has happened yet. And even once we do accept it, it is possible to misunderstand grief. Grief happens one bit at a time. You feel bad for a while and then it stops. You feel fine, then you feel sad again, then the sadness stops. It is important to know that grief works like this, so that we are not frightened that it will carry on forever. It won't. It will stop. But while it does happen, it is important to our recovery.

You see, we experience only as much sadness as is necessary for our feelings to adjust as far as they can at any one time, then the feeling stops. When we have become used to that amount of change and loss, the unconscious lets us feel a bit more, and so on, until we have fully absorbed the whole significance of the loss. By the same token, when grief does stop, there is no need to feel guilty that we didn't care enough. Some people have told me they feel guilty about feeling all right so soon after a loss, and I have to tell them not to worry, and reassure them that they are simply being well looked after by their unconscious mind.

This process of grief can be divided into four stages. The first, denial, is where we try to reject what has happened. In the second, we accept it, but still feel angry about it. In the third stage we acknowledge our sadness, and when we reach the fourth we have accepted our loss and are able to look back and enjoy the happy memories we have.

The trouble with heartbreak, however, is that the natural process of grief does not always work properly. People can get stuck, repeating the same painful feelings over and over again. I first understood why this happened when I was working with a woman whose second husband had left her for a younger woman. Her first husband had died. As we worked together she told me, in a hesitant and ashamed tone of voice, that it had been easier to recover from being widowed than it was to recover from being left. When her first husband died her world was changed forever, but his love for her, and hers for him, was not questioned. It was an extremely painful loss, but an absolute one.

When her second husband left, it called into question the love they had had together, and the fact that he was still living in the same town made it all the more difficult for her to forget him and move on. It is these sorts of questions about the past and the future that can make heartbreak so painful and complicated.

None of us can avoid feeling some pain and sadness at the end of a relationship we cared about—as we will see, a certain amount is even necessary. But this book is dedicated to helping you avoid the unnecessary repetition of pain and distress. It helps you change the way you think and feel about the past and the future by working with your fundamental systems of thought and feeling. Better still, as you make these changes and understand them, you prepare yourself for a richer and stronger relationship in the future.

The three core systems of human being

I remember attending a conference of psychotherapists and hypnotherapists nearly fifteen years ago and being struck by something most peculiar. There were lots and lots of different speakers and nearly all of them were clearly caring, intelligent and competent therapists. However, it became apparent that each of them understood human beings differently. That seemed to me a bit odd. After all, psychotherapists spend all their working lives dealing with human beings, so you might expect them to know and agree about what human beings are. But it was clear that there was no single, agreed understanding of what a human being is.

That conference inspired me to do a considerable amount of research in psychotherapy and philosophy to discover if there was a central understanding of what a human being is, about which we could all agree. While I was doing that, a number of American researchers were making very important breakthroughs in understanding the connection between the mind and the body. Bringing together all this research added up to a rich and complex set of insights into the human being. And, as well as the philosophical and psycho-biological findings, it also let us produce a practical method to heal a broken heart.

The essential insight is this. Human beings are in essence a combination of three things:

The conscious mind;

The unconscious mind;

The physiological system of the body.

These three systems coexist and interrelate. Our intelligence and our emotions function in each of these three systems. All our magnificent potential as human beings lies in these systems, and an understanding of this simple model of the human being is all that is needed to begin to learn how to make lasting personal change.

You could also say that these three systems are simply different aspects of the same thing, or three parts of one system. And it is equally true that there are other important and subtle processes in our being that we are not discussing here. But we will talk about these three systems here because it is the easiest and most useful way to understand what is going on in heartbreak, and how to recover and move on.

The conscious mind

We do our active thinking in our conscious mind. The conscious mind is our immediate awareness of what is around us, and the thoughts and pictures we use in our head. It is the voice with which we talk to ourselves, the ideas we are paying attention to, and our ability to make decisions.

It is the part of ourselves with which we are most familiar, and yet in a way it is our most mysterious part. Scientists have tried for decades to understand how it works and to locate it exactly in the body. Philosophers have tried for centuries to define consciousness. Technologists have struggled in vain to replicate consciousness with artificial intelligence computers. A lot of questions remain to be answered, but we can now make a clear definition of the conscious mind.

The conscious mind is two interdependent processes: awareness, and the creation of meaning. The first is fairly obvious. Consciousness is always awareness of something—we use the word "conscious" as a synonym for awake or awar...

More About the Author

Over the past twenty years, Paul McKenna, Ph.D. has helped millions of people successfully lose weight, quit smoking, overcome insomnia, eliminate stress, and increase self-confidence. He is Britain's bestselling non-fiction author, having sold 3 million books in 3 years, and his TV shows and live appearances have been watched and attended by hundreds of millions of people in 42 countries around the world. Paul has famously worked his unique brand of personal transformation with Hollywood movie stars, Olympic gold medallists, rock stars, top business achievers, and royalty. He has consistently astounded his audiences and clients by proving how small changes in people's lives can yield huge results, whether it's curing someone of a lifelong phobia, an addiction or clearing up deep-seated issues in a matter of days... Now, it's your turn!

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
This book helped her more than anything else.
Terrie Hahn
This book is somewhat different from most of Mckenna's books but it is still very good.
SuperChuckie
The exercises can help you change the way you feel.
Bones

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

62 of 64 people found the following review helpful By booklover99 on December 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
OK the wallowing in misery, self-pity, and denial is SO over. How I loved this book! I have been struggling mightily in a heartbreaking relationship with a really cold man - thinking he was something else, and thinking there were real feelings and a soul in there if I could only peel that onion back one more layer. It just got worse and worse until I hated myself as much or more as I hated him. Obsession, compulsive behavior, self-torture - what a waste of time and life! And who wants to win the "I hate you more" contest anyway? Hate is the worst! Over the years I think I've read every single "breakup recovery" books, some more helpful than others - but most of them have the same advice. "Rally your girlfriends, stay busy, excercise more, know it will eventually get better!" Yeah, whatever. The advice helps, but it really just distracts you from the pain, rather than helping you truly heal and throw out the pain for good. What's cool about this book is how it provides tools and excercises (I know, but these are really good tools and exercises.) you can use immediately, anywhere / anytime to change the way you feel and see your situation through visualization and self-hypnosis. It also had very keen insight into human behavior - both yours and others. If you're ready to pick yourself up and really move on, this is the one I would recommend. Good luck!
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34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Terrie Hahn on April 20, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I got this book from the library for my daughter. It did wonders for her after her boyfriend of 3 years broke up with her without warning. She had lost weight, was going to a counselor, her grades suffered, and she couldn't stop crying. This book helped her more than anything else. She's a very visual person and the book gave her visual exercises to do; and also practical things to do like changing your habits or changing the furniture around. She showed it to the counselor she was going to at college and the counselor liked it so much, she bought it to keep for other students to look at. I had to bring the book back to the library, but my daughter wanted to have a copy of her own, so here I am at Amazon getting her her own copy. This is a great book for anyone going through heartbreak or for anyone who wants to help someone in that situation.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Ana on May 9, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
During the two months after my break up, I went through a roller coaster ride. My emotions were everywhere, and worst of all, when I felt better, I always feared that it was just my imagination and that I would soon feel worse again. I got a lot of support from my friends and family, but inside my brain painful images that reminded me of my past would pop up involuntarily from time to time.

The biggest obstacle this book has helped me overcome is related to the fact that one of its authors is a hypnotist. I have only read half way through the book, but I believe I have found everything that I needed already. The techniques they presented in the first half uses a semi-hypnotic sort of way to help you manipulate and recode your memories so that you can change your way of thinking - from the root. Ever since following the instructions in the book, I really do feel like I was able to stop thinking about my ex and stop feeling pained.

I think most books helping you deal with break ups are shallow. Many books are just out to make a buck on someone who is desperate for help. This book is much better than the other break up book I bought, but books alone cannot help you get over a heartbreak. I would recommend this to someone who is looking for that last thing to help them completely get over their break up.
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39 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Kat Starwolf on April 28, 2007
Format: Paperback
Although this book contains some helpful information, I wouldn't go so far as to say that it lived up to the author's claims of being able to "stop the pain of a broken heart in its tracks and bring about lasting improvements..." in my life, anyway. But then, maybe my situation is a bit different from those which Drs. McKenna and Willbourn reported.

That's not to say, however, that it won't work for others. Obviously, all our situations are different; consequently others will be affected or respond to this information much differently. But then, while I want the pain to stop, I'm not willing to stop loving my ex, which is where the good doctors' techniques ultimately lead the reader. Granted, falling out of love is the ultimate goal for many who wish to get over their exes. But at the same time, for many others - such as myself - it is not.

I also found their advice on eliminating jealousy and obsession by utilizing a technique to `white it out' not only rather simplistic, but unrealistic. For some - both men and women - being able to let go of either obsession or jealousy is hardly as easy as pretending that it can be erased. Just like love, jealousy and obsession are two very powerful emotions that take time to work through. This, I would posit, is where the utilization of Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP), hypnosis, retraining and reframing are, in my humble opinion, more likely to work; along with a good dose of cognitive behavior therapy.

The reference to New Orleans Gestalt therapist, Anne Teachworth's theory, that we learn to relate to significant others based on the relational interactions we observed in our parents, resonated strongly.
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