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4.7 out of 5 stars
How I Met Your Mother: Season 5
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48 of 52 people found the following review helpful
on June 9, 2010
Kids... I hope you brought your notebooks, because the story of how I met your mother is a lot longer than you might think...

You get the feeling with each passing season that Ted Mosby's "story" is not so much about how he met his wife, but a cleverly disguised series of lessons for his adolescent kids as they enter young adulthood. That's not to say his quest for "the one" is actually just a footnote in the story, though. Many of the things Ted learned along the way were directly connected to his search for the elusive Mrs. Mosby. It just so happens that after five seasons, information has leaked regarding the wife's identity, but we've still yet to "meet" her. I know CBS has a good thing going with this show, but I'm wondering how much longer the writers can stall this inevitable meeting without the story becoming completely absurd.

**Possible Spoilers in Next Section**
For HIMYM fans who are drawn in by Ted Mosby's journey to find his soul mate, Season 5 may come as a mild disappointment. The 100th episode was monumental, not just for the show itself, but for fans thirsting for details on the future Mrs. Mosby. However, outside of that episode there was very little advancement made in the whole "meeting your mother" facet of the show. Now for fans who might be more indifferent to the sentimentality of the show, or just have no problem with the stall for the sake of prolonging the series, this is a fantastic season. S5 more than any was centered around Barney Stinson, whose story ranged from serious relationships to sexual escapades more unique and insane than ever before, "The Playbook" (ep.8) and "The Perfect Week" (ep.14) in particular. As simple as it seems, my favorite single moment of the entire series came in the first episode of this season when Ted is teaching his first college class and is panicking because he doesn't know if "professor" has one "f" or two.
The first seven episodes focused mainly on the evolving relationship between Barney and Robin, a real leap of faith taken by the writers given the fact that Barney's "womanizer" status had always been a major theme of the show. Daring as it was, it didn't disrupt the flow of the show and the aftermath made for some hilarious episodes and epic moments.
** ** **

High Points of the Season:
- Barney Stinson's song & dance number in "Girls Versus Suits" (ep.12) (also the 100th episode)
- "The Window" (ep.10) - We all know that one person who is never single
- New York Yankee outfielder Nick Swisher's guest appearance in "The Perfect Week"
- Ted's literal "double" date in "Double Date" (ep.2) displays some of his most endearing... and annoying mannerisms
- "Last Cigarette Ever" (ep.11) for its realistic portrayal of the difficulty in quitting
- Ted makes an impulse purchase in "Home Wreckers" (ep.20)
- We get a full dose of Ted's intellectual side in "Robots Versus Wrestlers" (ep.22)
- The introduction of the doppelgangers and the impact it has over the course of the season
- The yellow umbrella (we assume) makes its way back to its rightful owner in the 100th episode
- The fourth slap in "Slapsgiving 2: Revenge of the Slap" (ep.9)
- Robin's path to U.S. citizenship in "Duel Citizenship" (ep.5)

One of the things I like most about the show is their tendency to bring past themes back to the present. For example, the famous "naked man" routine makes a surprise appearance in Season 5. There are still consistent references to Ted's ex-fiance Stella and even her beau, Tony, makes an unexpected contribution to one episode. Lily can't seem to shake her old flame, Scooter, and Ted unveils the blue french horn one more time.

I honestly don't think the show is declining at all. The amazing thing is that I thought the writers would have trouble coming up with stories for Marshall and Lily once they got married, yet they're still coming up with great ideas for the couple. The originality is bewildering for having written 112 episodes. How I Met Your Mother is still one my favorite shows and I'm looking forward to the 6th season.
* I will update on Special Features, etc. when I buy the DVD set.

Season Grade: A-
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on October 28, 2013
RECAP: The series follows Ted, an architect telling his children the story of how he met their mother. Each season shows Ted and his friends experiencing all of the moments and antics that will eventually/hopefully lead to Ted meeting and falling in love with his future wife. In general, it's probably necessary to have watched the previous seasons before jumping in at Season 5, since there are references to the past and previous character development plays a role. I've come to terms with the fact that IF we ever learn who the mother is, it will be the very last episode. Despite being trailed along all this time, the happenings of Ted and his friends are incredibly funny. To some degree, their regular antics do get a little old, but in the next season the writers begin to change things up and lend a little story-freshening. I do like this show and it's one you can watch several times, though I recommend having the seasons on hand because it is kind of important to be able to watch them in order. This is a well-written and family appropriate show that keeps fans begging for more.

Season 5 kicked off in the fall of 2009 with main characters: Josh Radnor as Ted Mosby, Neil Patrick Harris as Barney Stinson, Cobie Smulders as Robin Scherbatsky, Alyson Hannigan as Lily Aldrin, and Jason Segel as Marshall Eriksen. As the series progresses it is also picking up more and more celebrity cameos [ehem, did you know that the voice of "future Ted" in the precaps is actually Bob Saget?]; Season 5 features cameos from Chris Elliott as Mickey Aldrin, Marshall Manesh as Ranjit, Sarah Wright as Claire, Joe Manganiello as Brad Morris, Charles Chun as Mr. Park, Lindsay Sloane as Jen, Carrie Underwood as Tiffany, Nick Swisher as himself, Stacy Keibler as Krina, Judy Greer as Royce, Chris Kattan as Jed Mosely, Rachel Bilson as Cindy, Amanda Peet as Jenkins, Peter Bogdanovish as himself, and Jennifer Lopez as Anita Appleby.

SEASON 5: The previous season left us all on a cliff-hanger. The finale bombshell was the confession of love between Robin and Barney. Thankfully, Season 5 picks up right where Season 4 left off, and ends with Ted finally letting us know that he had already (at this point in the re-telling) "met" his kids' mother. While we're no closer to knowing who the mother is, we are still dying to find out.

Episode 1: "Definitions"--Ted starts his career as a university professor with an embarrassing blunder; Lily discovers Barney and Robin's secret.

Episode 2: "Double Date"--Barney and Marshall discover Lily's doppelganger; Ted goes on a blind date repeat.

Episode 3: "Robin 101"--As Robin and Barney attempt to strengthen their relationship, Barney is caught making a Robin `cheat sheet.'

Episode 4: "The Sexless Innkeeper"--Marshall and Lily have high expectations of their new couple-friends. Ted discovers that the location of his apartment may be more attractive to a girl than he is; revenge/self-validation is sweet.

Episode 5: "Duel Citizenship"--Robin's vivacious personality leads to an assault charge, forcing her to choose between Canada and the United States. When Marshall and Ted's favorite pizzeria plans to close, they make a trip to Chicago for one last slice and a final frontier of bro-mance.

Episode 6: "Bagpipes"--The "bagpipes" played by Ted's neighbors are disturbing his peace. Barney incites a domestic power-struggle between Lily and Marshall, but Ted figures out that Barney did it intentionally to make his fights with Robin seem less problematic.

Episode 7: "The Rough Patch"--Robin and Barney's relationship becomes hazardous to their personal happiness; the gang decides it's time to break them up. The couple, despite their friends' meddling, makes the decision on their own.

Episode 8: "The Playbook"--Robin and Barney call different post-relationship plays; Robin focuses on her career, though Marshall and Ted insist she's focusing on her coworker. Barney picks up where he left off in the game of picking up chicks.

Episode 9: "Slapsgiving 2: Revenge of the Slap"--Much to Lily's dismay, Marshall invites Lily's father to their Thanksgiving feast. Marshall rewards Ted and Barney for their turkey-saving deed by giving them one of his slaps from the remaining slap-bet allowance.

Episode 10: "The Window"--Marshall reunites with the dreams of his younger self and has to reevaluate his mid-life standing. The gang tries to keep Ted's window-of-opportunity with his dream girl open long enough for him to strike before she gets a new boyfriend.

Episode 11: "Last Cigarette Ever"--Due to work conditions, Marshall revives his smoking habit and it spreads to the rest of the group. The tension between Robin and he co-anchor, Don, escalates.

Episode 12: "Girls vs. Suits"--Barney's new "challenge" doesn't care for his favorite go-to-attire. When Ted dates Cindy, we get our first known peek at his future wife (Cindy's roommate).

Episode 13: "Jenkins"--Ted invents a drinking game based on Robin's TV interviews, but Robin gets the last laugh. To prevent feelings of jealousy from Lily, Marshall deliberately fails to divulge that his new friend and coworker, Jenkins, is female.

Episode 14: "The Perfect Week"--Ted fumbles in the classroom by offending a student; Barney, with the support of the gang, goes for the `perfect week' by attempting to pick up a new girl every night for seven straight days.

Episode 15: "Rabbit or Duck"--Ted considers an arranged marriage. Don invites Robin to spend time with him on Valentine's Day; Robin is conflicted in her feelings. Barney acquires an influx of interested women after posting his phone number during the Super Bowl.

Episode 16: "Hooked"--Matters between Ted and his new love interest, Tiffany, bring on the revelation that everyone (even if they're married) keeps an admirer on-the-hook.

Episode 17: "Of Course"--Robin has been secretly holding in her distaste for hearing about Barney's `conquests.' She seeks out an author, Anita, who writes about being a professional rejecter to men's advances in hopes that Anita can successfully put Barney in his place.

Episode 18: "Say Cheese"--Lily becomes frustrated with the succession of group photos, mainly because Ted is never pictured with the same woman twice; she upset that Ted constantly welcomes new dates into their exclusive gang, which creates a rift between Marshall, Lily, and Ted (and Ted's new girlfriend).

Episode 19: "Zoo or False"--When Marshall gets mugged at the zoo, he tells Lily not to worry because the bandit was actually one of the monkeys. Interested in the monkey story, Robin convinces Marshall to be interviewed on her show. Marshall confesses that he made up the thieving monkey to ease Lily's fears, though what REALLY happened remains a mystery.

Episode 20: "Home Wreckers"--Barney drops a bombshell about Ted's mom. As a result of personal crisis, Ted buys a house in the suburbs in hopes that he can turn it into a home.

Episode 21: "Twin Beds"--Sleeplessness leads Marshall and Lily to purchase twin beds. Barney and Ted begin to realize the seriousness of Robin's relationship with Don; the two boys regress in maturity about which of them is best for Robin, but they end up pushing her further away.

Episode 22: "Robots vs. Wrestlers"--The gang crashes a party after Ted intercepts an invitation intended for someone else. Barney wants everyone to join him at the Robots vs. Wrestlers fight, but the initial no-shows leave him feeling as if everyone is drifting apart.

Episode 23: "The Wedding Bride"--Tony releases a film based on the ending of Ted and Stella's engagement which highlights an outsider's opinion of the baggage Ted has been toting around.

Episode 24: "Doppelgangers"--It is revealed that Lily and Marshall made a pact concerning the right time to begin having children, and it hinges on finding each member of the gang's doppelganger. Robin refuses a job in Chicago in order to stay with Don... and offer that he later accepts in her place.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
While I do enjoy this show, I find the constant focus on sex a bit repetitive. I am not sure why the same. continued focus on "who is sleeping with who" has to be the baseline for almost every episode of this show. I think that the characters are very well written, and that the overall story (and continuity between episodes) is really good, but the only reason I don't give this series a 5-star rating is that the characters are all just a little overly sexualized....and sometimes, it just feels a bit much.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 22, 2014
Hilarious show. Reminds of my twenties. Watch for the hidden things in the episodes. Will watch this Dow over and over again.
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on December 6, 2010
i have been following himym since day one so i am a huge fan. two of my favorite episodes from this season is 'the playbook' and 'the wedding bride'. i esp love lily's cigarette voice in the 'last cigarette ever' episode. the acting is great, the jokes are funny, and they portray new yorkers very well (i'm a new yorker). this season will def get you laughing and is a great add on esp if you have all the seasons.
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on July 15, 2014
god show. My wife and I watch it every night before sleep
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on July 7, 2014
Love it!
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on July 5, 2014
This show is hilarious! The characters work so well together. I enjoy Marshall sense of humor. Great show to watch.
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on July 4, 2014
Lots of belly laughs. Very entertaining and some very clever writers.
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on July 2, 2014
Great show
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