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4.1 out of 5 stars
How to Move to Canada: A Primer for Americans
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43 of 45 people found the following review helpful
on March 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book doesn't pull any punches - you are leaving the United States and moving to another country - an action not to be taken lightly at all. Whether entering our friendly neighbors to the north as just a permanent resident or going all the way and becoming a Canadian citizen (Note! You don't have to give up your US citizenship!)- it's a lot more complicated than just arriving, buying a house, and starting your new job that you've previously located and landed. Interesting sidebar segments on those who have gone before and what they did - or wished they had done - to make the move and transition easier and less stressful.

Yes you can "retire" to Canada - you just have to loan the government $400,000 (CD) interest free for 61 months and have total assets of greater than $800,000 (CD) when you enter and before the loan. No more just showing up with your retirement nest egg.
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41 of 45 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
I found this book reasonably useful as a means of learning how the immigration process works for Canada. You could certainly research all this info on the Internet yourself, but it would be a bother. The author points out some common and potentially serious mistakes that applicants often make on their paperwork.

Also, she herself is an American immigrant to Canada, and speaks from experience and from the American perspective, which makes this book superior to another of its type, "Living and Working in Canada" which was written by a British citizen for an audience of non-North Americans.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on November 10, 2006
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This book won't tell you everything you need to know to move to Canada, but it will get you started and tell you where to go for more information. The names, addresses, phone numbers and websites in this book will save you many hours of research. Vignettes from people who have already made the move are interesting. A detailed section on health care, province by province, describes waiting periods, what's covered and how to sign up.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
This is the most thoroughly readable how-to book I have seen on moving to Canada. It is practical and authoritative and has helped my quest for emigration greatly. It's a good investment and the perfect 'starter' book for anyone with thoughts of becoming an ex-pat by moving north of the border.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on January 9, 2007
Format: Paperback
Great book, comprehensive and well-written. Tipped us off to a Customs regulation (it involves inventorying your entire household, including counting your socks!) that caused us to abort our plan to move to Canada. Wish we'd had this book earlier, we would have saved thousands of dollars in fees and two years of my life.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on November 29, 2009
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Definitely a good primer on how to move to Canada. If you want more in depth information on Canada, consider "Politics in Canada: Culture, Institutions, Behaviour and Public Policy". It's a bit dated, but very comprehensive.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on September 29, 2006
Format: Paperback
Found this book very useful. Good practical info that helped me get settled here in the last month-- contact info for a variety of agencies: social insurance, health care, etc. that definitely helped me transition efficiently without hours spent pouring through web searches. A nice primer that's been a good resource.
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
Myths about Canada abound: it's a "fake country," it has a population of 20, people are allowed to marry moose, it's one big year-round hockey tournament, it doesn't really exist, everyone speaks a vulgar form of French, and they have free healthcare but you'll perish waiting in line for service. Canada gets taken for granted. As such, many south of "the other border" know little about the enormous country that sits on top of them. And so myths perpetuate like Yukon snow. But moving to Canada? That assumes one already acknowledges its existence and possesses at least a speck of knowledge about the land with the maple leaf flag. "How To Move To Canada" only assumes the former. Those with no, or very minute, familiarity with Canada will drown in the historical, cultural, and political knowledge contained in these thick 200 pages.

Though its subtitle, "A Primer for Americans," remains a bit of a misnomer (since Canadians are also Americans), this book nonetheless provides a great launching pad for those wanting to immigrate to the Great White North. Note that this book assumes readers want to permanently move to Canada, or at least obtain dual citizenship (only a recent possibility). But those who merely want to "try it out" via a temporary work permit will also benefit from the information within. Both groups will learn about the steps to long term settlement, the long process, and the potential legal roadblocks. Such questions as "when do I need an immigration attorney?" and "how long does citizenship take?" get addressed throughout. A handy "Immigration Time Line" outlines the steps from deciding to move, to permanent residency, and ultimately to Canadian citizenship. But again the underlying assumption is that the reader wants to immigrate, not just get a job. That's an important distinction the book doesn't address very clearly. People can move to and work in Canada without immigrating. Section Two does mention work permits, but briefly. It also contains another very short section on retiring to Canada. Those looking for detailed information on those subjects should look elsewhere.

Hopefully those considering moving to Canada have already done their homework about where and why they want to move. Regardless, "Moving to Canada" contains droves of information on Canadian history, healthcare, politics, climate, differences from province to province (and territory to territory), employment, crime, economy (including housing prices) and demographics. No previous knowledge required. The final section, which makes up more than half the book's bulk, outlines basic information for all ten provinces, three territories, and many major cities. A word of caution: this book was published in 2006, but much of its information dates to the most recently available data. Some dates to 2001. Laws and the economy obviously fluctuate, so readers should consider that while perusing this book's figures. Canada's immigration website, frequently mentioned in the book, remains a good up to date resource.

"How To Move To Canada" contains far more than immigration instructions. It encompasses a historical and cultural survey of North America's placid giant. Expect to learn things like "why do people in Quebec speak French?" "does Canada have a Queen?" "how did Canada become what it is today?" but especially "how do I move there permanently?" This book even serves as a great reference for those who don't ultimately immigrate. As such, "How To Move To Canada" remains a great and easy to read introduction for anyone.
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25 of 34 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This is a good review of moving and living in Canada for folks who intend to work there or open a business. It offers no real information for retirees wanting to live or relocate there. Unfortunately, THAT was the information I was looking for.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on April 18, 2013
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
Youre way better off looking at the web site. This stuff is crazy outdated. The rest is common sense things on how to move.
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