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How Schools Shortchange Girls: The AAUW Report : A Study of Major Findings on Girls and Education Paperback – May 17, 1995


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Marlowe & Company; 1st trade pbk. ed edition (May 17, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1569248214
  • ISBN-13: 978-1569248218
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,535,154 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The Wellesley College Center for Research on Women researched gender bias in United States schools and came up with a detailed analysis of how gender-insensitive curriculum, testing and policies handicap girls. Covering 20 years of research on girls in preschool through the 12th grade, the report documents the effects of gender inequities not only on the college-bound but on girls in vocational programs and teen mothers as well. It concludes with 40 sensible, straightforward recommendations for changing schools, like encouraging young mothers to stay in school or choosing programs that do not perpetuate gender stereotypes.The AAUW already released this report but hopes to reach a wider audience by publishing it in this slim volume. Deborah Tannen's endorsement will help, but lack of overarching authorship or voice gives the book a bland, clinical, by-committee style. Unfortunately, individual human subjects are conspicuously absent, as well, so readers end up with numbers, charts and laws filling their heads, rather than the girls who are the purpose of the study. Although a must for educators and researchers, How Schools Shortchange Girls lacks popular appeal.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Parents, teachers and policymakers receive a study which presents major findings on girls and education, documenting exactly how and why schools shortchange girls in the educational process. Research is specific and reaches beyond generalities to document exactly how girls and boys learn and what the differences are in their classroom experiences. -- Midwest Book Review

Customer Reviews

2.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Jerry L. Rosiek on November 4, 2006
The previously posted reviews for this book are belligerent and misleading. This book was published as a provocation to educators everywhere to examine the way educational insitutions tolerate and enable various practices that harm young women personally and educationally. It had that effect when it was published and can have that effect for new readers.

Authors and reviewers who retort that "It is BOYS who are suffering, not girls" seem to believe that we cannot wish to serve both boys and girls better at the same time. How well boys are (or are not) doing is irrelevant to the fact that girls face a number of unnecessary hazards in our schools and culture. Among these are an epidemic of sexual harassment in secondary schools, near zero rates of femaile Ph.D.s in engineering and the physical sciences (other than biology), eating disorders, and blatant resistance at high schools and colleges to the Title IX law, just to name a few.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 14, 2000
Self-esteem and school performance are often correlated. Teenagers who have high self-esteem are more likely to well in school than those who don't. In fact, academic self esteem is considered a component of general self-esteem (Harter, 1987). It is not clear how these are related; perhaps success in school makes a teenager feel better about him/herself. The data collected in the AAUW study are readily available on disk for any interested researcher. Although this book has a number of flaws, it makes a contribution to knowledge about today's teenagers in the US.
Reference:
Harter, S. (1987). The determinants and mediational role of global self-worth in children. In N. Eisenberg (Ed.) Contemporary topics in developmental psychology (pp. 219 - 242). New York: Wiley.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jordan on February 19, 2014
Christina Hoff-Sommers laid the Wellesley Report flat in Who Stole Feminism. This screed provides no insight into how girls learn (or whether or not they in fact learn differently from boys at all) and is useless to educators and academics.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Valjeaner Ford on September 18, 2009
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"How Schools Shortchange Girls" is an excellent source of information for individuals who are interested in gender research. I conduct gender research and have found this study to be very informative in so many aspects. I will continue to use it as one of my main sources for gender research.
It is user friendly as well as an "easy read."
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14 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 22, 1999
Save your money. This report has been debunked by many other researchers. The conclusions reached by this "study" appear to have nothing to do with the actual data collected by the researchers. They seem to have been written before the data was even collected. While this report is widely available, the data it is based on is reportedly difficult to acquire, and with reason: it is embarrasing to the AAUW researchers. How do they conclude that girls are short-changed? Because their self-esteem is lower, and thus their school performance. Then higher self-esteem means higer performance, right? What they DON'T tell you in this report is that they found black boys to have the highest self-esteem of all the groups studied. So then why are black boys the group with the poorest performance? This "study" is by NO MEANS a serious academic work.
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