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How to Talk to an Autistic Kid Hardcover – April 1, 2011


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Frequently Bought Together

How to Talk to an Autistic Kid + The Survival Guide for Kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders (And Their Parents) + Ten Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew: Updated and Expanded Edition
Price for all three: $34.72

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Free Spirit Publishing (April 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1575423650
  • ISBN-13: 978-1575423654
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #223,739 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Clearly explain[s] the difficulties with communication and social interactions that frequently accompany autism, while urging readers to reach out to and stick up for autistic children.”—Publishers Weekly



“While the book is short and written in language that is easy to understand, it does an impressive job of speaking directly and succinctly about the issues and offering solutions . . . This book could be used as a read-aloud, with a teacher or therapist working either with a mixed group of children or those on the spectrum, giving them words to use in social and school settings.”—School Library Journal



Best of the Best 2012—Chicago Public Library



“Perfect for introducing the topic of autism to grade school and middle school students.” —Green Bay Press-Gazette



Gold award winner in ForeWord Reviews’ 2011 Book of the Year Awards



Who better to explain the challenges of typical kids communicating with autistic kids than 14-year-old Daniel Stefanski, who has autism? “Even though my brain is different, I’m still a kid.” And like any kid who’s been ignored, Daniel can often feel lonely. Through his casual and frank first-person narration, accompanied by two-tone digital illustrations, he recognizes that autistic kids may look and sound different when trying to communicate, but they still want to be included. After explaining how autistic kids have trouble understanding figures of speech and body language, often get “stuck” on one topic, and may have sensitivity to loud noises or bright lights, etc., he offers suggestions on how to engage autistic kids and give them social cues (“Excuse me, could you step back just a bit? I need a little more space”). The teen also addresses bullying (and yes, he can tell the difference between laughing with him and at him). Daniel’s insight, courage, and hopefulness make this an accessible guide to bridging the gap of diversity.—Booklist



“I just love the feel-good message of this book . . . one of the best children’s books on autism that I have seen . . . This book will help the children and teens of today become the compassionate adults of tomorrow, as they learn how to relate to the increasing numbers of people being diagnosed with ASD.”—Autism National Committee



Learning Magazine Teachers’ Choice Award for the Family

About the Author

Daniel Stefanski is fourteen years old and autistic. He has a passion for writing and drawing and likes to declare proudly "I'm autistic and artistic." A talented golfer, Daniel has participated in the Special Olympics and other competitive golf events. At age four, he was adopted from an orphanage in Bulgaria and flew 18 hours with his new mom to his new home in Valparaiso, Indiana. An animal lover and shelter volunteer, Daniel is surrounded by the love of his mom, dad, stepfather, brother, and five dogs.


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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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This book is very well written!
Sara
This book was a great way to explain to children about autistic kids.
Charlena Byrd
Ive read several books and this is one of my favorite on the topic.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By CristiAk on July 18, 2011
Format: Hardcover
How To talk to an Autistic Kid is an awesome book. It is written by 14 year old Daniel Stefanski, who is on the spectrum. He has done a remarkable job educating both his peers and adults. It is a short book, some may call it a picture book for the middle school age. I think we can all learn from it. I am raising an autistic child. It is not easy watching him struggle to have conversations with other who do not understand. I would like to ask every teacher out there to get this book and find a way to share it with your classroom.
I love the way Daniel talks about how autistic children "hear" and "see", (or not see), things. He also brought up important things like getting stuck, not remembering to share, some of the different behaviors that some autistic children do and even the sensory issues. I love the section on Be a good friend where Daniel says, Don't feel sorry for me. I have autism, but I'm cool with who I am." This is my wish for Jr. Daniel reminds us to reach out to children with autism. He also asks us to stand up for children with autism from the bullies and then tells us how. And he calls us the hero. To me he is the hero.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Bookish Delights on April 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover
How To Talk To An Autistic Kid is a very endearing picture book with wonderful suggestions on how to speak and interact with an autistic kid in a more respectful and kind manner. The book highlights the importance of really accepting and treating autistic kids just like any other kid, because even though they are different in some ways, they are very similar in other ways. It also teaches kids to not be afraid of befriending an autistic kid. Written by a 14-year-old autistic kid himself, this book offers a unique point of view that you really won't get from mainstream books about autism that are more impersonal and make you feel like you are just being given information. What's great about this book is that you can put a face to this autistic disorder, of someone who is actually experiencing it first-hand. I don't know if you can get any more sincere than that! How To Talk To An Autistic Kid really personalizes the whole reading experience in an extremely engaging way. Daniel tackles a sensitive subject with grace as well as humor at times. This book offers priceless advice in a fun, very approachable, easy-to-read set-up, with easy-to-follow tips, and includes many colorful illustrations to reiterate each point. And by the end of the book, you really feel like you got to know Daniel, who is more than just an autistic kid.

Daniel does a great job of really pouring his heart out in this book in an effort to help make the lives of autistic kids a little easier and better socially, not only at school, but any place where they are among non-autistic peers. Adults will also find this book helpful and it will heighten their understanding of autistic behavior in kids and learn what to do in certain situations. I am really glad Daniel decided to write this book.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Interested Communicator on May 27, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I just happened across this book in a store, and bought it. Its simple message and processes for communication are the heart of the book. For someone who has been exposed to children with autism spectrum disorder, it opened my eyes to what I did well and what I could have done better in communicating with those children.

"How to Talk to an Autistic Kid" is an essential tool in every classroom, every workplace, and every home--regardless of the presence of an "Autistic kid".
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mitchell R. Goldstein on November 23, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I am a psychiatrist who now has this book in his office. I have been able to recommend this book to several of the families of recently diagnosed children with Autistic Disorder. I found that it was inspirational for several of them to see how a child wiht Autistic Disorder could overcome some of his difficulties to produce this well written and informative book. I am sure it will be helpful to many readers.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By jan kindle on April 22, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is exactly as it is presented. A book written by a kid for kids to read about how to relate to some one that they don't understand---especially autistic kids. Adults could often use a little help in this area also. I found it helpful and fun to read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bernadette Hicks on April 26, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have a daughter who has autism...this book describes how she feels every day. Thank you for having the courage to write this book Daniel- because of your efforts other kids can have a better understanding of the effects of autism and how to be friends to kids with disabilities.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Karen Johnson on December 9, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have a mildly autistic sister who's in 1st grade, and Mr. Stefanski reminded me of her. I'm not listing names, but others at my school tease another kid with very mild autism. They have NO idea of how a majorly autistic child is. I feel like I'm the ONLY one who knows what autism is.
=(
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By Nancy Clayman on July 11, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
As the grandparent of an "artistic" kid' , I've often wondered about what he is thinking and feeling. Daniel's openness and his amazingly mature insights educated and reassured me. Thank you Daniel for this beautiful book. I am waiting for you to write that second one !
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