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How to Talk So People Listen: The Real Key to Job Success Paperback – March 22, 1989


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Paperbacks (March 22, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060915730
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060915735
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,275,384 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Author of What Makes Juries Listen, Emmy winner for her Boston TV talk show, Hamlin here presents a variety of techniques and approaches to promote job success. In a breezy, informal discourse, she begins with a differentiation of three basic work personalities"achievers, affiliators and influencers." Suggesting ways that each of these types may conduct a conference, ask for a raise, lobby a client, solicit a would-be employer, Hamlin provides guidelines, insights and advice that are patently useful. There are many innovative strategies for the neophyte public speaker, for example, and for making presentations both verbal and visual. This is a compendium of tested techniques that can help readers to improve communication on the job and elsewhere. 30,000 first printing; author tour.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"How to Talk So People Listen is an invaluable guide to communicating simply and well in virtually any setting....essential to developing an effective management style....Sonya can write as she speaks: clearly and concisely." -- James W. Walker, Jr., General Counsel, CIGNA Corporation

"Sonya's book offers both insight into the communication/negotiation process and helpful, clearly illustrated examples on how to impove the prospects for success both for the knowledgeable practitioner and those just embarking upon their career. I recommend it to both." -- Chris G. Andersen, Vice Chairman, Paine Weber, Inc.

"This book should be read by everyone. There is an art to success: listening. No one articulates and reveals this secret more than Sonya. She is an expert in the field." -- Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill, Jr., Former Speaker of the House of Representatives


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book was a pleasure to read, with numerous examples of how to conduct yourself so that people, well, listen. Hamlin draws on her experience as a trial lawyer's consultant and in television, breaking down the communication process into an examination of the motivations of the participants.
Take away only a few tips from this book, and you are bound to get better responses from anyone you talk with - by phone, by email, in person.
The only downside to the book is that as it was written in 1988 there is no mention of Internet communications. Examples and tips specific to email, instant messaging, voice over IP, etc., would have been helpful, but it's easy enough to extend the ideas and lessons to pretty much any medium.
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