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How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 360 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (April 29, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 069111417X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691114170
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #923,471 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Honorable Mention for the 2012 James Russell Lowell Prize, Modern Language Association

"How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain alternates between a dense critical unpicking of the ways in which books, reading and writing feature in Victorian fiction and non-fiction, and a strong cultural history of texts, writing and reading in social contexts. The long introductory section offers a detailed study of Victorian novelists' depictions of actions done to or with books, newspapers, or pamphlets."--David Finkelstein, Times Literary Supplement

"Leah Price's point--very cleverly made--is that Victorians did many things with their reading matter other than read it. One of her more striking examples is of fashionable ladies selecting a book to carry on the basis that its binding (silk-board, preferably, never calf) would match their dress that day. . . . Price is very entertaining on men's use of newspapers to create little zones of domestic, noli-me-tangere privacy. . . . Price asks extraordinarily good questions with wider import [and] has uncommonly brilliant things to say about the things Victorians did with their bookish things."--John Sutherland, Literary Review

"Price's work perches at the leading edge of a growing body of investigations into the history of reading."--Chronicle of Higher Education

"[H]ighly enjoyable, well researched and referenced."--Julia Peakman, History Today

"Leah Price has challenged every book historian, librarian, and reader of secular or spiritual scripture to think through the object we fondle or maul and the ways in which it circulates in whole and in pieces through our home and global economies. . . . [T]here's no doubt in my mind that this is a potent intervention in the study of material culture. No one who cares about books should miss handling and reading it."--Robert L. Patten, Review of English Studies

"If you are a literary scholar or a historian whose turf is Victorian Studies . . . you are probably aware of Price's book already. If not, you should add it to your must-read list. If you are interested more generally in the history of the book and reading, especially in connection with current talk about the state and fate of reading--if, for example, you enjoyed Alan Jacobs' The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction--you should read Price. And if you have noted the revival of 'materialism'--as a creed, so to speak, in which the writer explicitly affirms his or her faith--you will certainly want to get this book."--John Wilson, Books & Culture

"Price's writing is clever and her tone accessible."--Jillian Mandelkern, Library Journal

"[T]ells a compelling 'it-narrative' of its own about the ideological ways in which we handle books and impose them on others."--Valerie Sanders, Times Higher Education

"The printed book, certainly, will always be part of our media environment, although perhaps in unexpected ways. This lends particular interest to How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain, by Leah Price, a Harvard English professor. Her study is set in an era when mass production of books had not yet quite eliminated a sense of the book as a peculiar object in its own right, quite apart from its content, or as we say now, the 'text.' The book, Victorian readers knew, had more uses than simply conveying that text."--Philip Marchand, National Post

"Price does an excellent job in explaining the how and why of books during the era by discussing how the readers perceived themselves (men read newspapers to learn world events while women read novels that kept them away from their daily chores), the economical and social status of owning, reading or reciting books and how printed paper was mostly thrown away during the era."--Conny Crisalli, BookPleasures.com

"A most unusual book, one not to be taken lightly."--Frank Shaw, Electric Scotland

"While referencing the works of Anthony Trollope and Charles Dickens in particular, Price pays substantial attention to noncommercial, completely disposable popular literature, especially religious tracts. . . . Price makes print's non-reading or un-reading as meaningful as reading."--Choice

"Sheer originality."--Sarah Murdoch, Toronto Star

"Though rigorously academic, Price's book is also disarmingly humorous, a veritable goldmine of puns and linguistic whimsy."--Los Angeles Review of Books

"Price casts herself as an ethnographer setting out to discover what people and books actually did in the nineteenth century."--Paul Duguid, Threepenny Review

"Each of Price's seven case-studies is as illuminating as it is fascinating."--Simon Calder, Berfrois

"Engaging and incisive . . . constantly entertains the reader with new and surprising material. . . . Price raises a host of questions that reach beyond the Victorian period to contemporary reading practices and values . . . a delight."--Charlotte Mathieson, Open Letters Monthly

"Price opens up fresh avenues of thought about both the history of the book and the history of the novel in the 19th century. . . . How to Do Things with Books is a wonderfully rich work. Written with Price's customary verve and eye for the telling detail, it is a pleasure to read. . . . It brims with intellectual energy, studded with insights to provoke further thought."--Ina Ferris, Wordsworth Circle

"Price is a master of pithy comments that constantly remind us of the parallel but contrasting journeys of novels, tracts, fictional protagonists and real people."--Times Higher Education Supplement

"Extraordinarily rich."--Journal of Victorian Culture

"Strong writing continually spiced with wit. . . . This archaeologist of the imagination . . . continually offers new understandings of matters lying in plain sight but invisible to most of us. Like all first-rate criticism, hers makes us see familiar texts and familiar issues in new ways."--VictorianWeb

"I'm ambivalent about the value for contemporary pedagogy of teaching books only as objects. But there's no doubt in my mind that this is a potent intervention in the study of material culture. No one who cares about books should miss handling and reading it."--Robert L. Patten, Review of English Studies

"Price's study is . . . a timely reminder of the importance of materiality and raises questions about the uses and meanings of books that literary critics and cultural historians need to address. . . . [It] is meticulously researched, intelligently argued and sheds refreshing new light on an underexplored area of Victorian culture. Ultimately, whilst her subjects used their books as doorstops, cheese wrappers and toilet paper, the best thing to do with Price's text is simply to read it."--Bob Nicholson, European Review of History

"How To Do Things With Books is an eye-opening read. . . . This is a rare feat of writing. . . . When was the last time you read an academic book with such perfect gems of sentences you want to buttonhole someone to read them aloud? . . . How To Do Things With Books ends with a gloriously bold challenge. . . . An achievement as poignant as it is important."--Talia Schaffer, Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net

"[M]ost engaging. . . . A fascinating study."--Jon Mee, Recent Studies in the Nineteenth Century

From the Inside Flap

"Beautifully written, this superb book gives us a magnificent study of the social lives of books and texts in the Victorian period: their uses as missiles, doorstops, food wrapping, spouse-ignoring devices, and vehicles for individuation, spiritual development, and childlike wonder and delight. A joy to read."--Elaine Freedgood, New York University

"This timely and witty book is more than a shrewd look at the social lives of book-objects and their users, and a reconstruction of the protocols organizing that use. It also provides, gloriously, a new interpretation of the Victorian novel."--Deidre Lynch, University of Toronto

"Price has written an exceptional book of literary history that stretches the boundaries of what literary history means and does. Making her argument through an astonishing range of evidence about the uses of books, paper, and printed material in the nineteenth century, she shows that reading is not the only thing to do with books, either as objects or as historical evidence. A remarkable work."--Nicholas Dames, Columbia University


More About the Author

Leah Price is Professor of English and Chair of the History & Literature program at Harvard University. She teaches the novel, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British culture, narrative theory, gender studies, and the history of books and reading. Price is Humanities Director at the Radcliffe Institute; she also co-directs the faculty seminar on the History of the Book at the Harvard Humanities Center. In 2006 Price was awarded a chair in recognition of exceptional graduate and undergraduate teaching.

Price's books include The Anthology and the Rise of the Novel and (co-edited with Pamela Thurschwell) Literary Secretaries/Secretarial Culture; she has also edited (with Seth Lerer) a special issue of PMLA on The History of the Book and the Idea of Literature. She writes on old and new media for the New York Times Book Review, the London Review of Books, and the Boston Globe.

Unpacking my Library: Writers and their Books is just out from Yale University Press; How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain is forthcoming from Princeton in spring 2012. Price is at work on a new book, The Book that Never Was: How Idealizing the Printed Past is Distorting Our Digital Future.

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8 of 13 people found the following review helpful By connywithay on May 2, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Leah Price must love, cherish and honor all things about, related to and involving books in the 1900s. Her book How To Do Things With Books In Victorian Britain conveys her dedication, knowledge and writing skills in regard to the art of books and reading.

This off-white linen hard-bound book is covered with a gray jacket of cut roses made out of white with black written pages. The book is three hundred and fifty pages. Of those numbered pages, eighteen are dedicated to an introduction, twenty-eight for notes, thirty-two for works cited and a twenty-two page index. There are twenty black and white illustrations throughout the seven chapters and a conclusion. There was no noticeable grammar or typographical errors.

This book is geared to those deeply involved and entrenched in the Victorian era of English writing as it cites authors such as Dickens, Trollope, Collins and Mayhew along with the Bible. Chapters dissect actual novels, religious tracts and biographies, commenting on specific sentences or paragraphs and how they relate to books, the opinions of books, the types of readers and the cultural outcome of such books during the 1900s.

Price does an excellent job in explaining the how and why of books during the era by discussing how the readers perceived themselves (men read newspapers to learn world events while women read novels that kept them away from their daily chores), the economical and social status of owning, reading or reciting books and how printed paper was mostly thrown away during the era. Often it mentions books related to the Bible and how they were promoted, popularized or shunned.
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Wow! What a difficult book to struggle through! I give "How to Do Things With Books in Victorian Britain" five stars only because of the depth of scholarship exhibited by Dr. Leah Price a distinguished professor of English Literature at Harvard. Her short but densely written book explains in great detail many fascinating facts about the use of books in a nonliterary way in Victorian England (1837-1901). Among the gems in this book we learn:
a. Books were widely distributed in this era as printing presses became mechanized and the public's literarcy rate grew.
b. Great Victorian novelists such as Charles Dickens; Wilkie Collins; George Eliot; Anthony Trollope; George Eliot and others often revealed characters through their use of books. For example: an unhappy marriage could be manifested through the husband's hiding behind a newspaper at the dinner table while the uninvolved wife peruses a modern novel.
c. She devotes many pages to exploring the use of religious tracts which were given out free to the public.
d. Printed circulars; junk mail; printed advertisements and bills were circulated
e. Books who had outlived their lives as literature were often used to wrap food; as toilet paper; paper bags and box stuffings
f. Books were viewed and used differently by different classes in Britain's class conscious society. Men were considered more literary than women and servants.
Price's style is awful! She writes in an effort to compel the unwary reader to run to the dictionary through her use of long technical words and concepts. She should learn how to present her material in a clearer manner if she ever wishes to reach the general public. This book reads as a technical manual for other English Literature professionals. It is a slough of despond for the weary reader to plow through on the way to the final page.
The book has a lengthy bibliography and includes period art work. Great information but proceed with cautioin!
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