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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is seriously one of my two favorite books, ever.
This book is my go-to book for so many things: entertainment, leisure, education, deep thought, humor, argument building, and on and on and on.
There are complete paragraphs in this book I've memorized, because this book is able to put into words those ideas and beliefs I've always had but have never been able to articulate with any substantial strength or...
Published on September 24, 2010 by Oregon Jaybird

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6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Ye Olde Cartesian Scientism
True skepticism is always agnostic to new theories. And yet so-called skeptics, like the author, are always bogged down in dogma. Consider the opening of the book:

"We show that there are good reasons for believing that the following claims are, in fact, FALSE:

* There's no such thing as objective truth. We make our own truth.
* There's no such...
Published 12 months ago by Eric John


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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is seriously one of my two favorite books, ever., September 24, 2010
This review is from: How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age (Paperback)
This book is my go-to book for so many things: entertainment, leisure, education, deep thought, humor, argument building, and on and on and on.
There are complete paragraphs in this book I've memorized, because this book is able to put into words those ideas and beliefs I've always had but have never been able to articulate with any substantial strength or conviction. The book basically is a tutorial on debunking the ridiculous, the metaphysical, the belief systems of unproveable hocus-pocus. It does so in a way that is both unintentionally humorous, while at the same time quite empowering. It's a perfect book for agnostics or aethiests, myself being the former. It's also a great book for practicioners of stoicism and/or cynicism, again myself being the former.
My whole life I'd been looking for a book exactly like this. I feel more well-rounded for reading it. And again, I believe like me, if you purchase this book and are of liberal mind, you will refer to it time and again.
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5.0 out of 5 stars text book- but great reading, May 9, 2014
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This review is from: How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age (Paperback)
this is one text book i won't be sending back. Really interesting- scientific way of thinking about the paranormal. Reads like a novel- couldn't put it down.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Strengthen Your Defenses Against Outrageous Claims, June 22, 2010
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This review is from: How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age (Paperback)
This book teaches critical thinking skills to methodically evaluate any sort of claim. These could include medical, scientific or paranormal claims, among others. The authors take the reader on a step-by-step lesson plan that teaches one how to look critically at claims made about things like alternative medicine, out-of-body experiences and the like. At the end of each chapter they provide questions and problems to challenge the reader and reinforce the lessons taught. For anyone who needs to deal with these issues on a personal level, or who needs to deal with people who believe some outlandish things, this is excellent training ground. What I found most satisfying in the book is that, true to their own teaching, where a claim cannot be proven or disproven beyond a reasonable doubt, the authors state so, even though you can pretty much figure out what side they are on.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, July 30, 2014
This review is from: How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age (Paperback)
item as describe
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6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Ye Olde Cartesian Scientism, December 16, 2013
By 
Eric John (Planet Earth) - See all my reviews
This review is from: How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age (Paperback)
True skepticism is always agnostic to new theories. And yet so-called skeptics, like the author, are always bogged down in dogma. Consider the opening of the book:

"We show that there are good reasons for believing that the following claims are, in fact, FALSE:

* There's no such thing as objective truth. We make our own truth.
* There's no such thing as objective reality. We make our own reality.
* There are spiritual, mystical, or inner ways of knowing that are
superior to our ordinary ways of knowing.
* If an experience seems real, it is real.
* If an idea feels right to you, it is right.
* We are incapable of acquiring knowledge of the true nature of reality.
* Science itself is irrational or mystical. It's just another faith or belief system or myth, with no more justification than any other.
* It doesn't matter whether beliefs are true or not, as long as they're meaningful to you."

________________________

Never mind that these fields are wide and varied, the author has essentially lumped it all together as mass delusion: ESP, UFOs, Eastern mysticism, etc etc., It's all the same for him.

And never mind that almost weekly there are studies in physics which are challenging our previous assumptions, (Quantum Entanglement comes to mind), but the entire
field of paranormal - (as in, goes against current scientific notions) - is just wrong since it can't be backed up by a peer-reviewed paper from Yale.

It's all subjective and therefore hooey.

Don't get me wrong- I love science. The accomplishments of Western science are unparalleled. However, it is a science of Materialism, and for that reason it is limited by its' *instrumentation*. Better toys invariably lead to a more complete (and "weirder") understanding of the universe. At the moment I would argue we're still playing with Legos.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading, September 4, 2011
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This review is from: How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age (Paperback)
Our world is increasingly reliant on science yet our daily lives are assaulted with pseudo-science distributed by the misinformed or the mischievous. This book is essential reading for those who would like to be able to differentiate between the two and develop or hone their critical thinking skills.
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars why is this book so expensive?, November 28, 2010
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This review is from: How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age (Paperback)
I just want to know, why is this book so expensive? A paperback of less than 400 pages, over $40????
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Odd book, September 20, 2012
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This review is from: How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age (Paperback)
It was a good book for the class i took, but it was not anything special by any means. wouldn't use unless for school
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fresno State, April 22, 2013
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This review is from: How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age (Paperback)
This was my required reading for my Science and Non-Sense class with Ingrahm. We never used it but I read the book and found it interesting.
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9 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Pragmatists Stay Away, April 3, 2012
This review is from: How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age (Paperback)
Now any philosophy student should be perfectly willing to read an argument that tries to negate their worldview. Furthermore, they have an obligation to size up said arguments and point out specific critique about them in order to challenge. The authors of this book fail where many philosophy students succeed. In Chapter One, a laundry list of claims which the authors believe they can prove false is presented. I am frankly not sure they can argue any of them effectively, but lets just talk about one "There is no such thing as objective truth." This is pragmatism's credo and frankly deserves an extensive argument to disprove it if one wants to take up that challenge. These authors, however, think they can shrug the idea off in a few short sentences. They claim that if this idea were true, thought and communication would be impossible because we could not differentiate idea. This is garbage. Thought and communication without objective truth is more than possible because, as pragmatists say, we use truth to enable us to do precisely these things. The arguments in this book a short and sloppy, and I highly suggest that if you are a pragmatist you be rid of it from your collection. If you believe otherwise, I still encourage you to find a book which doesn't think good arguments are as easy to work with as duplos and some books that take these arguments seriously
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How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age
How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age by Lewis Vaughn (Paperback - February 3, 2010)
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