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How To Choose A Chess Move Paperback – October 1, 2005


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Paperback, October 1, 2005
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: B T Batsford; 1st edition (October 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0713489790
  • ISBN-13: 978-0713489798
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #806,711 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

International Master Andrew Soltis is a professional journalist and popular chess writer. He is the author of Bobby Fischer Rediscovered (0713488468) and Rethinking the Chess Pieces (0713489049), also published by B T Batsford. He lives in New York.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

97 of 103 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on September 17, 2006
This is a lot move than just how to choose "A" move, but would be better titled, How to choose the best "continuation". How to calculate and what goes into a logical plan with the thought process is a good discription of what Andrew Soltis's book is all about. Certainly this book is no substitute for having to study books on tactical situations, opening traps and positional play, but a nice supliment which will actually help you study better in addition to analyzing during play.
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Bret Helm on December 5, 2005
One of the most difficult aspects of chess learning I have faced in my chess studies is to get a handle on an effective and efficient thought process. This is especially true when playing against the clock in rated tournament games. How much time should you spend looking for tactics in a chess position? What should you look at next if you don't find any winning (or game-saving) tactics? Exactly how do chess grandmasters think during a chess game? Soltis does an excellent job of explaining these and many other points of consideration to make the chess move decision process more efficient. I'm just about halfway through the book, and I've already seen my play (and rating) improve.

I would classify the material as moderately advanced and state that the reader would get the most benefit from Soltis' examples if s/he already has a strong understanding of tactics and the basics of position play. So, I would recommend for USCF 1500 - 2000 rated players.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Vermonter on January 5, 2009
This book will help anyone who is "stuck" in class B. It really helped me see where my thought process was going wrong when choosing a plan.
My chief complaint is that the discussion of a position can go a page or two past the diagram and it is clumsy to flip back and forth for those of us without photographic memories.
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32 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Brad Ashlock on November 22, 2005
This book is, in a way, Part II of Soltis's book on calculation. It's very practical and gives some insights on how GMs choose moves at the board using Kotov's method, process of elimination, and "intuition". A good book with some good examples, but nothing revolutionary here.
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10 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Alonzo H. Ross on June 17, 2007
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I really liked this book. Last week at our Chess Club I reviewed a Topalov game from this book. Topalov as Black has a drawish position or even a slightly inferior position. McDonald spends an entire page discussing the postion, comparing each of the pieces White versus Black. As the game progresses, Topalov improves each of his pieces and has a distinct advantage 10 moves later. This is a great example of not only evaluating a position, but also evaluating what that position can become. I really enjoyed this book and will consider future books by this author.
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