Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

How We Won the War Paperback – October 1, 1976

ISBN-13: 978-0916894016 ISBN-10: 0916894010 Edition: 0th

4 New from $684.90 12 Used from $138.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$684.90 $138.00
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Recon Pubns (October 1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0916894010
  • ISBN-13: 978-0916894016
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.3 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #812,505 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

. . . should be studied by every left-activist ... to learn to apply the same kind of creative revolutionary and military art -- Sanity Now! June 1977

Behind its jargon, this little book by the winning team in Vietnam gives some beginning clues. -- RAIN, March 1978

About the Author

The author has described the founding of the Vietnam People's Army on December 22, 1944, in these terms: "We forgot that we were only 34 human beings equipped with rudimentary weapons. We imagined ourselves to be an army of steel, not to be defeated by any force, ready to destroy the enemy." For more than 30 years, General Giap was the key organizer of the Vietnamese armed forces and its main strategic thinker. At the time he wrote these reflections on the War with the U. S., he was a member of the political bureau of the Vietnam Workers' Party and vice-premier and minister of defense of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 20, 2004
Format: Paperback
Generals Dung and Giap, the two great military strategists of North Vietnam, describe the methods they used in the Ho Chi Minh Campaign. This was the 1975 offensive that culminated in the fall of Saigon and ended the Vietnam War.
Written in Party Speak, this short volume is a lengthy read. Buried within the patriotic prose are the important strategic decisions that allowed the communists to complete in five months what they originally planned to accomplish in two years. Credit for these decisions - blanketing all geographic areas of the South, utilizing the regular army along with local insurgents, establishing good roads for rapid deployment of regular troops, maintaining flexibility and rapidly following up on enemy errors - is always given to the Party. There is no personalization either of friend or foe. The United States is named "the U.S." throughout the essay, and the South Vietnamese army and government institutions are called "the enemy" or "the puppet."
The objective of this book was the description, in broad terms, of the strategies employed by North Vietnam in 1975 well after withdrawal of U.S. troops. If you are looking for details in tactics employed throughout the campaign, you will not find them here. Nor is this the book in which Gen. Giap supposedly stated that groups such at the Vietnam Veterans Against the War gave the North the resolve to carry on. This book is for the reader already familiar with the course of the war after the Paris Agreement, who is interested in hearing in the words of the victors how they envisioned the means of bringing down the South Vietnamese government.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
36 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Mike on June 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
I have read General Giap's work both in the original Vietnamese and in English. There is little to no valuable insight contained within the political dogma and Party rhetoric that fills this puffed-up praise of General Giap. The reader should keep in mind this work was not originally published to discuss the strategy and tactics of the final push to capture the Republic of Vietnam. Instead, it was published to praise General Giap and portray him to the Vietnamese people as a hero of the Communist Party who outwitted and defeated the foreign invaders, thus placing Giap in a class with other heroes of Vietnamese history such as Le Loi and the 2 Trung Sisters. This is NOT a serious analysis of the final events of the Vietnam war, and offers little promise other than to satisfy a curiosity for how the Communist Party interprets history for the people of Vietnam.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Robert McDaniels on September 22, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is mostly filled with self-congratulatory propaganda. It is written for an audience that is decidedly non-military, and it is therefore very light on substance that is useful to professional warfighters. Although it does have a few useful nuggets, Che Gueverra's book is much more enlightening if you want to learn about guerilla warfare. The title is even misleading. "How we Won the War" implies a discussion of the entire conlfict, but this book only deals with the final 1975 offensive. The two commentaries in the front are both by unabashed communist sympathizers who don't even understand the book well enough to see it for what it is, a 25 page pep-talk, and see it instead as a "how to" guide for revolutions everywhere, which it is not. It is on the Commandant's reading list, so every Marine should read it, but don't expect to get too much out of it. Of the 20-odd books I have read from the reading list, this is by far the most disappointing, and least useful.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Thomas G. Aftanas on July 1, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When you subtract the table of contents, preface, introduction, appendix and advertisements this book is 34 pages. It reads like a piece of propaganda from 1968. Don't waste your money.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 35 people found the following review helpful By James McCarthy on July 12, 2003
Format: Paperback
If you're interested in really finding out how General Giap masterminded the military victory in Vietnam, this book isn't going to answer the question. Instead, Giap takes the opportunity simply to reinforce the stated political positions of the Vietnamese communist movement in book form in a way that's not particular original or well-written.
If you're a communist, you'll probably enjoy saying "Right on!" as he makes an endless stream of broad generalizations about the political side of the victory, but if you're interested in finding out about what Giap is truly a genius at doing, fighting a guerilla war, you won't really find this book satisfying.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images