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91 of 94 people found the following review helpful
on October 18, 2008
There are cheaper filters, and there are more expensive filters. How much should I be paying?

Conventional wisdom says don't hamper your expensive lenses with a cheap filter - so you want to avoid the el cheapos out there. But how good is "good enough"?

For my uses, I have been using the higher end Hoya filters - like the DMC and SMC versions - and have not been disappointed at all. I have two of this particular filter; one lives full time on my Canon 24-105 f/4L and the other lives on my Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5. Not a problem with either of them so far. I have also owned Tiffen (a little bit cheaper - but more flare), and B+W (more expensive, equal performance to the Hoya IMHO).

And I should mention that I use the 24-105mm as my walkabout lens and I like to be ready to shoot, so I rarely use a lens cap. I regard this Hoya filter as my "see-through lens cap", and it does its job (protecting the lens itself) admirably, without a lot of flare or optical distortion (at least to my eyes). So far it has cleaned up easily and proven quite durable, as I tend to travel a lot and shoot in semi-harsh conditions.

I am sure that eventually I'll have to replace my UV filter after the inevitable accident or incident. And when the time comes, it'll be another Hoya filter, just like this one.
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39 of 39 people found the following review helpful
on May 20, 2008
I bought this filter to attach to a Tokina 12-24mm super wide angle lens. I needed protection for the ominous objective lens, protection from flare common to this type of lens, and very thin profile to prevent vignetting when at the shortest focal length. The filter has performed exceptionally well in all categories. I have been able to make flare free pictures with the sun directly in front of the lens. There is no distortion, no vignetting, and I have only praise for this filter.
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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
on March 7, 2011
You can go to your pro photographer friends and ask for a recommendation... they may tell you BW, Heliospan, or a number of well know companies that make filters and have impecable reputations. If you buy on reputation or recommendation I think you are cutting yourself short. It is hard for a human being (the human eye) to objectively asertain the performance of a filter such as a UV filter... after all... we can't see UV light. We can see the haze in backgroung outdoor shots however it is hard to quantify it.

I read a lab test on a large number of el-cheap and very expensive (the full range) of UV filters that were analyzed using a Hatachi "State of the Art" spectrometer. This device is design to determine how much light of various wavelengts are being filtered and how much is being let through. I was SHOCKED and dismayed by the number of high end filter that didn't even measure up to the UV light filtering capabilites of plain old glass (glass is a good UV filter by itself!). They also tested how much the filter stops down your lens (reducing incoming light) and though this one didn't fare as well as a high end unit (that produced no UV filtering) it is still very very good.

The Hoya multi coated filters beat out ALL other in the UV tests. I bought the PRO1 filter because it is slightly lower profile and won't contribute to vignetting on my wide angle lens. The ring is metal... aluminum I think. It is also blackened to prevent reflections. Hope this helps someone... Google, "Filter Review Hatachi Spectrometer" to find and read the study yourself. Apparently some of these highly regarded companies are sitting on their laurels and not putting forth quality products anymore. Leave your mind open to Science... not to hype, recommendation (people tend to recommend their own bad purchases), and reputation. Thanks.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
I know there are less expensive UV filters out there, but having been burned by cheapies in the past, I decided to spend a little more and get a good one. Images with this filter come out crystal clear with no softness. I am basically using it for protection of the front element of my Canon "L" lenses, and not so much for UV protection, but protection doesn't do me any good if the images aren't sharp.

UPDATE 2/24/10 This filter is still on my EF 24-105 f4 L and I just bought another one to keep on my EF 17-40 f4 L. Usually if anything messy gets thrown my way it lands on this filter instead of my front lens element and I can use my lens cleaner on it instead of the actual lens. Once in awhile a stray piece of dust will get past the threads (how I have no idea), but I'd rather use a bulb blower on the actual lens than wipe it any day. The price of this filter is worth the peace of mind you get.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on February 12, 2012
Long story short...transported my Canon 100-400mm lens with this filter attached in a well-padded (I thought) carry-on to Disney World. On arrival, i found the filter had been smashed to bits by something...I never found out what or how as I didn't see it until I got to my hotel room. However, my $1600 lens was completely protected and safe. I shudder to think what would have happened without this filter taking the blow and preventing further damage. Thanks, Hoya, for making such a quality product!!!!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on June 5, 2009
I purchased this UV filter to protect my Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM Wide Angle Lens and it does the job without vignetting any photographs. It fits perfectly onto the 77mm lens width. I would like to buy a circular polarizer for my 10-22mm; however, I'd imagine I won't be able to use both the circ polarizer AND UV filter without showing some vignetting.

I would definitely recommend this filter to anyone with a 10-22mm lens.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on August 9, 2008
Why is it that you invest so much in a nice UV/Haze filter for your expensive lens, and these things don't even come with their own lens caps that fit snug on the filter ring? The Canon lens cap doesn't fit on this filter very well.

The filter itself is great. I really can tell the difference, but man, that lens cap issue is ruining it!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 6, 2014
I purchased 3 Hoya Pro1 digital filters, 2 -77mm & 1- 72mm they all had to be returned because of bubbles in the coating on the glass. 1st 77mm had bubble when I opened the filter, 2nd 77mm bubble showed up with in a week & the 72mm bubbles (there were 2!) showed up at about 2 weeks. They were very easy to see when holding the filter at a slant to a light - each bubble was about 1MM - small, but not something you want in front of your expensive lens! Make sure you buy from someone with a return policy in case you get a bad copy!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on November 8, 2008
For me, Hoya Pro line filters are the perfect balance between excellent optics and cost. I've used Hoya for many, many years and have never been disappointed. I can't say this for all the filters I've owned. I choose to semi-permantely leave the filter on my lens for protection. I own several Canon "L" lens so I'm especially sensitive to sharpness. I've paid more and received less. I don't think you'll be disappointed.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on February 7, 2009
I read that another reviewer put the Hoya Pro 1 DMC UV on his Tokina 11-16mm F2.8 and he was pleased, so when I needed a filter for that same lens, I listened to his advice and got that same filter. I am very pleased and plan to buy another one for the Canon 24-105mm F4L I am getting next week. Expensive lenses require high quality filters, and this Hoya Pro 1 does the job for me!
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