L Ron Hubbard Died With Vistaril In His System


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Initial post: Jan 23, 2008 4:12:25 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 24, 2008 12:08:43 AM PST
If Scientologists are so against medications, why did L. Ron Hubbard die a Howard Hughes hermit with black teeth, long,dirty,matted hair, fingernails so long they curled under, and a body loaded with Vistaril? Please explain that one to me? See page 107-108 in Andrew Morton's wonderful and truthful book about Hubbard and his cult...."As the movement went into meltdown, Hubbard was in hiding, on the run from law for fraud and tax evasion. Those who glimpsed this shadowy character, then living under an assumed name in a remote ranch in Crestor, California, recall that he cut an incoherent, unkempt figure reminiscent of the eccentric billionaire, Howard Hughes. His teeth were black, his lank, shoulder-length hair dirty and matted, his nails long, gnarled, and curling-hardly an endorsement for the lifestyle he had spent years promoting. The ULTIMATE IRONY of his BIZARRE LIFE is that when he died in January 1986, shortly after suffering a stroke, his body was full of VISTARIL, a PSYCHIATRIC DRUG used to calm frantic or overanxious patients. Yet this was the same man who had devoted his life to fighting psychiatrists, blaming them for all the world's ills."

Hubbard died January 24, 1986 in a 1982 Blue Bird motor home. He had been injected with Vistaril(hydroxyzine hydrochloride) by intramuscular injection in the right buttock by Dr. Gene Denk. Public documents are on record. Located at San Luis Obispo Sheriff Office, Coroners file #8936.
A great website to get good information is www.ronthenut.org

I hope that everyone will purchase this book and spread the message that scientology is a fake, a cult, and just a mind control scheme to get your money.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2008 5:18:48 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Jan 23, 2008 5:19:41 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2008 5:20:21 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Jan 23, 2008 11:48:53 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2008 8:41:17 PM PST
Thank you for sharing. J. J. doesn't like it when anyone says anything about his beloved scientology because we are not allowed to have a difference in opinion from him. However, apparently it is perfectly okay for him to lash out at people that believe in medications helping people.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2008 11:54:42 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 24, 2008 12:11:04 AM PST
Thanks Deborah.....JJ needs to learn more about human behavior and their motives and what Scientology is all about. People are looking for something outside of themselves and will fall for just about anything that makes them feel in control. Scientology is mind games and mind control and what's worse, you have to pay the church of scientology for auditing so they are emptying your wallets to boot. Hope everyone spreads the word that scientology is a fake and a dangerous cult of mind control zombies.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 26, 2008 3:00:51 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 26, 2008 5:17:52 PM PST
Scotman says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 26, 2008 5:18:25 PM PST
Scotman says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 26, 2008 5:19:13 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Jan 26, 2008 5:19:31 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 26, 2008 8:17:17 PM PST
Tough Cookie says:
Ah, but J. J., see NEXT week's New York Times bestseller list, where Morton's book is #1: http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=239332&pf_rd_p=360166501&pf_rd_s=center-3&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_i=549028&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0AX47BC15PNR44XQESDM

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 27, 2008 8:16:44 PM PST
Martin P says:
What's up with all these deleted posts by J.J. Mourgos? It's odd to say the least...

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 27, 2008 8:19:42 PM PST
Martin P says:
http://www.drugs.com/mtm/vistaril.html says

"Hydroxyzine depresses activity in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), which causes relaxation and relief from anxiety. Therefore, hydroxyzine is used to treat anxiety disorders and tension in stressful situations--before surgery, for example. [...] Hydroxyzine is also an antihistamine."

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 28, 2008 8:52:13 AM PST
As a practing physician I thought I would throw my two cents into this discussion. There has been a lot of talk about this book- and scientology's assertions regarding modern medicine- and it is quite concerning to me and my colleagues that their largely unfounded proclamations have the potential to cause great harm. You are correct that hydroxyzine is classified by the FDA as an antihistamine with anticholinergic properties; however, Vistaril is NOT commonly prescribed to patients for treatment of allergies as would be other drugs within the same classification, such as Zyrtec (ceterizine). The two most common clinical indications for use of Vistaril are for symptomatic relief of anxiety and tension associated with psychoneurosis and as an adjunct in organic disease states in which anxiety is manifested; or as a sedative when used as premedication and following general anesthesia, typically given IM (intramuscular injection) or IV along with meperidine (Demerol). Vistaril (hydroxyzine hydrochloride) Intramuscular Solution is useful in treating the following types of patients when intramuscular administration is indicated:

The acutely disturbed or hysterical patient.
The acute or chronic alcoholic with anxiety withdrawal symptoms or delirium tremens.
As pre- and postoperative and pre- and postpartum adjunctive medication to permit reduction in narcotic dosage, allay anxiety and control emesis.The fact that Hubbard was given Vistaril IM rather that ingesting it himself indicates that he was either agitated or too ill to safely swallow an oral medication; either way, most credible medical professionals would deduce that the medication was NOT being given for allergies but rather to control or abate anxiety associated with pain or another acute psychotic condition. Standard of practice would dictate that if the patient were experiencing an acute allergic reaction then IM or IV steroids would be given instead as the quickest, safest, and most effective way to reduce the inflammatory response. Additionally, Vistaril has what we call a short half-life; in other words, it is metabolized rather rapidly by patients. This is what makes it such a good choice for pre-medication for procedures, but also NOT a good choice in treating allergies. In light of this, it is not surprising that the coroner only found traces of hydroxyzine in Hubbard's system; depending on time of dosage lapsed until time of death, it is quite possible that the majority of the medication had already been cleared by his system- in patients with normal kidney and liver function, this happens within a day or two at most, and therefore the medication doesn't reside in the bloodstream for very long.
One other issue that I want to specifically address has to do with Cruise's (and therefore scientology's) stance on pharmaceutical therapy and psychological disorders. It is a common misperception tha "popping a pill" will make depression, anxiety, and other similar mental afflictions "disappear"- but any medical or mental health professional knows that this is simply not true. I for one have ALWAYS stressed to my patients that the meds are an adjunct therapy, and that counseling, diet, exercise, and lifestyle changes go hand in hand with combating these afflictions- just as they would in a patient with diabetes or heart disease. There is also a huge rise in traditional medicine to include some of the naturopathic philosophies- and I for one have seen the benefits- yoga, massage, meditation, a diet consisting of whole, natural foods high in antioxidants, fiber, and vitamins all help patients to focus on themselves in a positive way- and who couldn't use a little more of that?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 28, 2008 5:00:52 PM PST
Thanks Doc for posting this information! Well done!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2008 2:24:23 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 29, 2008 3:01:44 AM PST
Reg."anxiety and tension associated with psychoneurosis," this ofcourse fits also the pattern observeable here; http://soc.world-journal.net/CruiseBook-22jan2008.html plus in many studies that depict Hubbard's known adult life.

But why does it appear that some take heed, about the fact that Hubbard might have been somehow 'ill' during what appears, possible most of his adult life? Or is there an expectation that people like Hubbard (and other 'religious innovators' or 'gurus') somehow would be more capable or/and healthier (be it mentally or otherwise) then humans in general?

So also in the case of Hubbard's alleged innovations, are there not also salespeople and even some manufacturers, who seem to exhibit the need to make a living (or preferable more than that-granted Hubbard made many millions of his adherents); even when they know that their products might not be all that good?

But given the man obviously had such an unhappy ending, maybe this doesn't bode to well for those who so eagerly clime this OT8 ladder, for they might fall of just like Hubbard did.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2008 5:49:14 AM PST
L Ron Hubbard was a hypocrite. This science fiction writer develops a religion that says that psychiatric medication is wrong, that psychiatry is wrong, and look how he winds up...he died a very sad death, and full of Vistaril to boot. Why can't Scientologists see thru this and see it for what it is. L Ron Hubbard exploited people by developing scientology...he knew that he could hook people in...that people need something to believe in..and he wrote this fiction, developed a system where you have to pay money to be audited, and of course the scientologists have control over you and urge you to disconnect from those who don't believe. Classic cult behavior. No different from Charles Manson brainwashing those young people in the 1960's...give them something to believe in and they'll do anything for you....

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 5, 2008 11:59:15 AM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2008 5:51:13 AM PST
Most pancreatitis is caused my alcohol abuse or dependency...very interesting.....

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2008 7:27:05 AM PST
Possibly. But then again how old was he when he (stopped to google it) he was 43 when he "became a scientologist". Enough time to cause damage without it being a sign of hypocrisy.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2008 7:03:00 PM PST
????? I don't understand your statement. You can get pancreatitis at age 43...
I'm sorry...I'm confused on your point...........

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2008 7:15:35 PM PST
Martin P says:
Hubbard did claim that Scientology could cure many serious physical diseases, including cancer: http://www.xenu.net/archive/audit/ar19.html

Obviously he was practicing at the most advanced level, so it would have been easy for him to cure his own pancreatitis without medication. But on the other hand anxiety should have been an even more trivial problem. What a conundrum...

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2008 7:17:01 PM PST
I mean that even if it was caused by alcohol abuse or dependency then he had plenty of time to cause it prior to being a scientologist

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2008 7:21:01 PM PST
Quoting xenu.net?

In any case I dont think that pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are the same. Im not even sure that all cancers were included since it only said "many serious physical diseases".

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2008 8:08:52 PM PST
Martin P says:
I didn't mean to imply that pancreatitis was the same as pancreatic cancer. I was using cancer as an example of what's generally considered a very serious disease, that Hubbard claimed to be able to cure.

The document is from a contemporary enquiry into scientology by the Australian state of Victoria. I trust that their quotes from Hubbard are accurate, but one could presumably go to the primary sources to be sure. They may have now realized this is embarassing/illegal and have removed these claims.

Skimming briefly through that report: Scientology claims to cure: radiation burns, cancer, all psychological trauma, arthritis, migraine, ulcers, allergies, asthma, coronary difficulties (psychosomatic - about one-third of all heart trouble cases), tendonitis, bursitis, paralysis (hysterical), eye trouble (non-pathological) have all responded. "In various places Hubbard has written to the effect that arthritis, eye conditions, heart conditions, cancer, all psychosomatic illnesses, morning sickness, ulcers, tuberculosis, the common cold, the common cough, illness from bacterial or virus infections, alcoholism and a multitude of other complaints and conditions are engramic and respond to processing."

"Scientology proofs people against mental and physical illness".

So why any medication at all?

The problem with claiming miraculous curing powers is that it's so embarrassing when you die.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2008 8:14:19 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 6, 2008 8:23:40 PM PST
Heehee. I didnt see death listed.
It does seem pretty extreme. I personally am unable to test all of it altho I did see the benefits against the common cold and cough. And their narconon program seems to have documented effectiveness to alcoholism. Considering their methods I can see why psychomsomatic and ulcers would work. And morning sickness (altho I doubt they call that a cure, probably a treatment :)
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Initial post:  Jan 23, 2008
Latest post:  Jun 18, 2012

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Tom Cruise: An Unauthorized Biography
Tom Cruise: An Unauthorized Biography by Andrew Morton (Hardcover - January 15, 2008)
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