Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Hubert the Pudge: A Vegetarian Tale Hardcover – October 10, 2006


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$7.19 $0.01
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-3–Hubert, who looks like a cross between an elephant, a pig, and a goat, lives on Farmer Jake's Processing Farm with many other pudges–all of them waiting to be carted off to the meat factory. Hubert manages to escape this fate and runs off to the jungle, where he meets wild animals and eats as much as he wants–eventually becoming big enough to give the elephants pudgeback rides. But still sad about the friends he left behind, he leads the jungle animals on a rescue mission, frees all the pudges, and persuades the farmer to change careers. Jake joins a health club, loses his belly, marries his trainer, and opens a tofu hot-dog factory, where the pudges help out and are paid in cobwebs (their favorite food). Everyone lives happily and healthily ever after. The illustrations vividly portray Hubert and the pudges' adventures, relying mainly on greens, pinks, and yellows. This is clearly a message book and it's not always logical. Purchase only if you're desperate for picture books on vegetarianism.–Judith Constantinides, formerly at East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library, LA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Drescher, known for his strange creatures and skewed, often gruesome view of the world, takes this tale down a more socially correct path--though not without the requisite quirky details. Hubert is a pudge--a pig with purple polka-dot horns and a long nose that curls just like his tail. Pudges have short, unhappy lives, ending at Jake's Pudge Processing Farm, where the result is "greasy food products." The only freedom they experience is during the yearly barn cleaning--and that's the day Hubert escapes. Life is good, and with lots of food and fresh air, Hubert becomes "supchunky-nrmous." His new size gives him the strength and courage to return to the farm and save his fellow pudge pals. He also has a word with Farmer Jake, and before someone can say "Whole Foods," the pudge-processing farm turns into a tofu mill. Amusing and edgy, the artwork features some memorable scenes, including a purple-tinted, two-page spread showing rows of penned pudges. There's more than fun here; message accomplished. Ilene Cooper
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick; 1ST edition (October 10, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0763619922
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763619923
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 10 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #225,861 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. Larsh on August 29, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm practically a vegan, but I have to say that I found this tale to be too scary for my little son. The pudge characters are a little too scary to look at and the story was a little too on the nose. I retuned the one I bought.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Andrew T. Hickman on August 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book does a fine job of walking the delicate line of not watering down the darker side of the meat industry without over villifying the people involved or painting too grim a picture. The illustrations remain consistently colorful and vivid. Further, this book gets across two of the most important issues surrounding factory farming: it is inhumane and diets composed of mostly meat are unhealthy. Hubert does a very good and subtle job of challenging our common beliefs about animals, demonstrated keenly by the front cover which shows that all the common meat dishes like lamb chops, ribs, and so on are actually parts of a once living breathing animal. This is the kind of book that fosters compassion for animals without invoking animosity towards meat eaters, the best kind of animal awareness book for children.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By JDHB on October 30, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Two thumbs up for this book! It's a great book to teach children about the plight of animals in factory farms. Good message and holds their interest!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Erika Balla-Harper on April 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover
My 5 year old loved this tale and I laughed. A whimsical and light fairy story that is fantastic for encouraging conversation around issues of how we treat animals and what we eat. Sure it is anthromorphising animals but that is a staple of childrens picture books. It isn't morally heavy and could be read (in a satirical light) by those over 8. Good stuff-perfect edu. tool for sensible discussions regarding how and what we eat.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By allison on October 2, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is too funny. Keeps the attention of my 14 month old and shares a great message. Highly recommend for any family concerned with the welfare of animals.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Christine M. Hill on December 23, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book for a vegetarian friend of mine to read to her grandkids. This book is delightful, and funny, with a little tougue in cheek humor just for grown ups.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
my 5 year old vegetarian really enjoyed the book. graphics are odd, but i think it adds to the charm :)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
"Hubert the Pudge" was an ok book from Henrik Drescher as it is about a pudge named Hubert who escapes from his cruel master, Farmer Jake, to live in the forest. After Hubert grows to be twice the size of an elephant, he goes back to Farmer Jake's farm to rescue his fellow pudges from being eaten.

I have always loved Henrik Drescher's wacky illustrations in most of his children's books, but I felt that this one was not as creative as his earlier books. The characters looked a bit too flat and the coloring in this book are mainly in dull colors. In other words, the illustrations lacked the crazy yet colorful feeling that Henrik Drescher's earlier books had before. As for the story, its so-so, even though I liked the fact that Henrik Drescher came up with a creative animal called the pudge that sprouts horns and has a nose like Pinocchio, but it's like I have heard of a dozen tales where animals escape from their evil owners to find a new life. "Hubert the Pudge" would be a great read for vegetarians, but for people who liked Henrik Drescher's earlier illustrations, not so much.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Frequently Bought Together

Hubert the Pudge: A Vegetarian Tale + That's Why We Don't Eat Animals: A Book About Vegans, Vegetarians, and All Living Things + Vegan Is Love: Having Heart and Taking Action
Buy the selected items together