Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $4.51 (30%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
A Human Being Died That N... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Light wear - Used book in very good condition
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

A Human Being Died That Night: A South African Woman Confronts the Legacy of Apartheid Paperback – April 19, 2004

4.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.44
$2.22 $0.01

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$10.44 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • A Human Being Died That Night: A South African Woman Confronts the Legacy of Apartheid
  • +
  • Country of My Skull: Guilt, Sorrow, and the Limits of Forgiveness in the New South Africa
Total price: $23.55
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

"A startlingly personal account...written with clarity, energy, and enormous empathy."

About the Author

PUMLA GOBODO-MADIKIZELA served on the Human Rights Violations Committee of South Africa’s great national experiment in healing, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. She lectures internationally on issues of reconciliation.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Longevity Book
Catherine the Great & Potemkin
The popular new release from Simon Sebag Montefiore. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; 59371st edition (April 19, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0618446591
  • ISBN-13: 978-0618446599
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.2 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #192,110 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Ann Mcelligott on November 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
Pumla Gobodo-Madikezela reflects on central human issues such as the nature of individual and social evil, the possibility of social reconciliation, the individual's ability to move from participation in violent evil to remorse, and the capacity to meet one another with forgiveness. As urgent at these issues are, her narrative makes compelling reading -- both her accounts of her face-to-face meetings with de Kock and her reflections on her personal story. She raises important questions. How are we to achieve reconciliation in an environment of domonization and divisiveness? Is the Nuremburg model of seeking justice for crimes against humanity actually a way of moving towards reconciliation? While she does not come to clear and definitive conclusions, her experiences and reflections raise some of the most urgent questions facing us as a human community.
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I read this book shortly after returning from a year in South Africa, when the Truth and Reconciliation Hearings were just waning. I originally bought it because of the timeliness of my visit. But I was also beginning the process of divorce. This book is a fascinating insight into the mind of a ruthless, apartheid murderer, but most important to me, the book has an underlying theme of the concept of forgiveness. We all have been taught that forgiving is the right thing to do, but is it? The author lets the reader decide. Terrific book!
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was born at the same time as the author, however as a middle class White, English speaking citizen who was politically aware and supported and worked for the official opposition - the Progressive Party and then the Democratic Party, I was completely in the dark as to the full horror of what the government was perpetrating in the name of all the Whites. This book is so interesting and so full of wisdom. It tries to make some sense of the times we lived through and the beliefs which led some people to such evil. A very good read, but remember, there were some of us who did not support Apartheid, but fought for a changed political system within the law and the moral code.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I expected this to simply be a narrative about the struggle to overcome apartheid in Sough Africa. in reality, to me it was more an explanation of how forgiveness happens - and the best one I've ever read.

The author (although a PhD in psychology) writes in a very readable style that was both a fascinating book and study in practical theology, but also one which haunting theme stays with me.

An excellent read! Purchased at Amazon.com on the recommendation of a friend
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I am a Bostonian who has read this gemlike little book in the weeks following the Marathon Bombings, and only a few months after the massacre at Sandy Hook. It describes how in the years after apartheit one of its henchman struggles - along with the author, a black South African woman - to absorb and come to grips with the unthinkable crimes he committed. The author opens her heart and mind to her subject, exploring the cultural conditions that encouraged him into criminality. With lambent intelligence and compassion, she concludes that our only hope of preventing such crimes is to fully see their perpetrators, so as to understand the culture that turned them into criminals. I wish to thank you, Ms. Gobodo-Madikazela, for so clearly illuminating this dark but miraculous corner of the heart, a part of our humanness that we must never forget.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Nina on September 9, 2014
Format: Paperback
Gobodo-Madikizela has written an amazing book which is undoubtedly one of the most probing, honest, and compassionate examinations of the human character I've ever read. The details of her work in South Africa's post-apartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission is an exercise in historical storytelling and an expansion of what it means to be human.

Tasked with finding ways to mend the myriad cracks in the shattered social landscape following apartheid, the author emphasizes the power and strength in compassion, forgiveness, empathy, compromise, and humanness as viable alternatives to punishment as reparation (in the context of the victim-victimizer relationship in systems of state-sponsored violence).

One of the things which I thought the author did most effectively here was to make me question the underlying humanity at play - or not at play - in the powerful and unwanted relationship between a criminal and victim. One of the most powerful questions asked here was: what does it mean to forgive a killer? What does it mean about them? What does it mean about you? The illustration of what's happening psychologically in the forgiveness process is very interesting.

This book, from an aesthetic perspective, is written wonderfully, with pointed prose, careful storytelling, and no fluff. There are so many quotes in this work that are so powerful. I certainly intend to give this a second reading so that I can take better notice of the author's original, self-reflective, and socially critical perspectives.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book because it's pertinent to my studies. I started reading it with the expectation that it would feel like work. It did not. The writing style is engaging; the narration awakens empathy; the subject matter is fascinating and rendered so. I highly recommend this, whether philosophy or psychology is your subject or whether you are just looking for an engaging thoughtful read.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

A Human Being Died That Night: A South African Woman Confronts the Legacy of Apartheid
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: A Human Being Died That Night: A South African Woman Confronts the Legacy of Apartheid