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on February 20, 2014
Before the Internet, I searched in used book stores for almost 15 years trying to find this gem. I got a used first edition in about 3 minutes when I Googled. I don't like to touch it because it is in delicate condition, so this reprint allows me to read this unforgettable story time and time again. HUMAN BULLETS is the best memoir to come out of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-1905. The translation from Japanese is quite good. I still can't put it down.
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on September 15, 2014
I relish obscurity and first-person accounts, even more so when both are found in a single work. The author's fatalistic attitude at the time of his service in the Imperial Army is foreign, if not alien, to contemporary first-world sensibilities. Not only is this book a preview, now in retrospect, to the Disaster of the early 20th Century, it points to the lurking monster which came dreadfully close to vanquishing its people during the resumption of the World Catastrophe.

A fascinating time capsule well worth the time of any aficionado of history.
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on May 20, 2014
This account of some of the battles of the Russo-Japanese War is astonishing for its immediacy and as an insight into the spirit of self-sacrifice in the Japanese soldier of the day, a prelude to a similar attitude in the First and Second Sino-Japanese and the Pacific Wars, and a reminder of the self-same vigour with which British Empire and American troops of the First World War wanted to "show the world what they were made of"...
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VINE VOICEon December 24, 2007
In his memoir, Tadayoshi Sakurai takes readers to places they rarely venture: a death-dealing world of machine guns, grenades and swords -- The Russo-Japanese War.

Sakurai, a Japanese Army Lieutenant, shows a keen sense for detail in chronicling his role in Japan's siege of Port Arthur -- Imperial Russia's most important Far Eastern Naval Base -- from the landing of the Japanese forces in Manchuria until his wounding while storming the fortress.

The personal anecdotes and graphic details about how he copes with life in camp and on the battlefield draw the reader in even when the writing is very poetic. He writes his memoir in the self-sacrificing traditional Japanese military spirit. It's fanatical, close-minded and very intolerant, but it's never stale.

"Human Bullets: A Soldier's Story of the Russo-Japanese War" was first published in Japan where it became somewhat of a literary sensation.
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on May 30, 2016
Hard to get a first hand story re Japanese soldiers.
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on September 9, 2015
These book is good,it shows haw the Russians cared about theyer peopole.as the Japan did theyer out moust for theyer pepole
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on February 1, 2013
Its basically like its brand new. No tears or bends or signs of wear. Very good! All the pages are there so thats the most important thing.
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