Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Men's Hightops Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Cecile McLorin Salvant UP3 $5 Off Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Shop Popular Services hog hog hog  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Gear Up for Football Baby Sale
Human Capitalism and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $4.68 (31%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 15 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Human Capitalism: How Eco... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Human Capitalism: How Economic Growth Has Made Us Smarter--and More Unequal Hardcover – May 5, 2013

11 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$10.27
$4.96 $0.94
$10.27 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 15 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Human Capitalism: How Economic Growth Has Made Us Smarter--and More Unequal + The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality
Price for both: $32.46

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

One of Bloomberg Businessweek's Best Books of 2014, chosen by Jeffrey M. Lacker

"Mr. Lindsey, formerly with the Cato Institute, is one of the most engaging libertarian writers. Here he seeks to address a much-talked about problem: While many Americans are becoming wealthier by joining the ranks of 'managers, professionals and entrepreneurs,' and the working class is not shrinking, those who remain in the dwindling middle find it harder to break into the so-called knowledge economy. . . . [I]t takes a special kind of talent to write about public policies like these in a way that doesn't put you to sleep, and he has that talent."--Barton Swaim, Wall Street Journal

"All of Brink's specific proposals are reasonable. . . . I really like the book."--Arnold Kling, Econlog

"Fascinating. . . . Lindsey suggests the problem of inequality is even more intractable than the pessimists had thought. He argues that the leitmotif of the post-industrial economy is growing complexity: there is more knowledge to acquire, more institutions to deal with and more choices to make. Success increasingly depends on your ability to master complexity, which in turn depends on your ability to master abstraction."--Adrian Wooldridge, Sunday Times

"It's short and cheap and very interesting, and I recommend it. . . . I find Mr. Lindsey's emphasis on complexity and networks very appealing."--Economist.com's Free Exchange blog

"Think about the mind-boggling number of e-mails, phone calls, and text messages that Americans send each other every day, and you'll realize that our lives have become more complex and interconnected than ever before. However, some social groups have fallen behind in the increasingly complex modern economy. In his short and highly readable book, Brink Lindsey tries to explain why this happened and what can be done about it."--Dalibor Rohac, City Journal

"Brink argues that there's plenty of potential for growth at the top of the economy, as reflected in the growing college wage premium. The problem is that even as the financial rewards to education continue to grow, the fraction of the population graduating from college has stagnated. . . . [I]nteresting."--Timothy B. Lee, Forbes.com

"Human Capitalism is a powerful and timely analysis of American inequality. While Lindsey acknowledges a serious problem, he also makes a convincing case that the government's approach to fixing it should be guided by essentially capitalist principles."--Yevgeniy Feyman, City Journal

"Brief, clear and forthright."--World Book Industry

"Lindey's recommendations for policy reforms are excellent."--Charles Murray, Claremont Review of Books

"[Lindsey] argues the case that economic inequality is more deeply intertwined with human capital accumulation and the process of economic growth than you thought."--Jeremy Lacker, Bloomberg Businessweek

From the Back Cover

"Human Capitalism is a compelling and important account of how and why people are being left behind in an increasingly complex economy. This is a 'big think' book that is both deeper and broader than the usual polemical arguments about inequality. Regardless of which side of the political divide you sit on, Lindsey will likely stimulate and infuriate you in equal measure."--Tyler Cowen, author of The Great Stagnation

"Rising income inequality is an issue society can no longer afford to ignore. This book deepens our understanding of the forces behind the problem and is bound to stimulate useful discussion of it."--Robert H. Frank, author of The Darwin Economy

"Providing an evenhanded approach to the heated issues surrounding human capital, this is a very strong and unusually well-written book that is also remarkable for squeezing so much into so few pages and making a wide range of scholarship accessible to general readers."--Steven Teles, Johns Hopkins University

"America's economic future isn't really about the top tax rate or entitlement spending. Rather, it is about our skills, our character, and our ability to form relationships that can help us navigate a more complex and chaotic world. That is the central insight of Brink Lindsey's Human Capitalism, which in a few short pages upends conventional understandings of how culture and economics intertwine--and what we should do about it."--Reihan Salam, co-author of Grand New Party

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (May 5, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691157324
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691157320
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.9 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,387,144 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Herbert Gintis on May 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover
We live in an age where most passionate political activists have limited vision, the right being passionate about the horrors of government income redistribution and need to avoid budget deficits, and the left being passionately alarmed about increasing income inequality favoring the ultra-rich, and the need to counter the austerity policies that protect the big banks against losses brought about by their reckless lending practices. I must admit that I am not much concerned with either of these threats, but rather with the growing cultural rift between the intelligent, motivated, and talented upper middle class and the increasingly dysfunctional lower middle class, and especially its male integument, which seems to have lost its way in a society that increasingly values drive, creativity, and capacity for abstract thought over pure upper body strength and physical stamina.

It is interesting that the phenomena is increasing recognized as a serious problem by conservative writers, such as Charles Murray and the author of this fine book, Brian Lindsey, whereas the liberal pundits cannot cease for a moment from wringing their hands about the excesses of the ultra-rich. Lindsey is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, which is a very, very conservative institution, although one whose analyses of society are usually worth paying attention to. The title of this book, Human Capitalism, refers to the fact that increasingly the goodies go to those who have "human capital," which is the result of investing in the development of individual skills and ability to address and solve social and technical problems. This development has long been anticipated, most eloquently in Michael Young's 1958 book The Rise of the Meritocracy.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By John V on September 6, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The widening income gap among American families is real. This book provides a lucid account of this trend and the reasons behind it. Importantly, it does so without the polemics associated with most commentaries on this delicate subject. It concludes with sensible policy recommendations that will appeal to bleeding heart libertarians.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Scott Tower on June 14, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Absolutely candid look at class distinction and why it exists. Put simply (save truly exceptional cases such as Bill Gates, Zuckerberg, etc) the real determinate of class is knowledge, formal education, and subsequent opportunity. If you are not moving forward you are sliding backward - take notice and actively improve your skill set or sit by and witness your standard of living deteriorate.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I thought it had good ideas about abstract reasoning and the world today and espeicially the future. My son, a college philosophy professor, also would rate it this way.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tampa Bay Lisa on June 20, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The author does a good job of looking at reasons for the growing gap between the "haves" and the "have nots." I agree with almost everything said.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Harold Kyte on July 7, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is well overdue. It successes in grasping what is one of the most essential aspects of today's unsettling world. I enjoyed the read
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Human Capitalism: How Economic Growth Has Made Us Smarter--and More Unequal
This item: Human Capitalism: How Economic Growth Has Made Us Smarter--and More Unequal
Price: $10.27
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com
Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: teaching