Human Transit and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$32.15
Qty:1
  • List Price: $35.00
  • Save: $2.85 (8%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 24? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Trade in your item
Get a $12.67
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Human Transit: How Clearer Thinking about Public Transit Can Enrich Our Communities and Our Lives Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-1597269728 ISBN-10: 1597269727 Edition: 1St Edition

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$32.15
$27.54 $26.54

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Human Transit: How Clearer Thinking about Public Transit Can Enrich Our Communities and Our Lives + The High Cost of Free Parking, Updated Edition + Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time
Price for all three: $75.72

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Sell Us Your Books
Get up to 80% back when you sell us your books, even if you didn't buy them at Amazon. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Island Press; 1St Edition edition (December 22, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1597269727
  • ISBN-13: 978-1597269728
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #506,257 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“This book gives professionals, pundits and the citizenry the tools to have conversations that lead to real solutions rather than confrontations.”
(Terry Lee-Williams Transport and Access Manager, City of Sydney, Australia)

“It's difficult to categorize Jarrett Walker's excellent new book, Human Transit. It's not quite for a popular audience, though it's written with engaging ease. It's not for academics, though it's as thorough as most published research and far more approachable. It's not strictly for a policy audience, though it's fresh grist for any transit wonk's mill. Its closest literary cousin may be a good language book, for it feels capable of teaching anyone, beginner or beyond, to speak Transit more fluently.”
(Atlantic Cities)

"Human Transit is a choice addition for any social issues or urban development collection."
(Midwest Book Review)

"Walker leads the reader through these intricate considerations with dexterity and thoroughness."
(Planning)

"Walker...has produced a well-written, totally nonpolemical, very readable book describing the many tradeoffs to be considered in meeting local goals for providing transit service."
(Choice)

"Walker takes complicated and often technical subjects and presents them to the reader in layman’s terms."
(Urban Review STL)

"Human Transit... presents itself as a sort of "Public Transportation for Dummies," explaining in abstract, but remarkably clear, terms the logic that governs public transit systems and the choices—some technical, some ethical—that transit planners and operators make."
    
(California Planning & Development Report)

 “Once in a while, a book comes along that summarizes most of what’s important about a particular subject, and it does so in a way that’s lucid and effortless. One such book is Jarrett Walker’s Human Transit…This is an easy read. You can go through the whole book in a few hours. That makes its lessons more likely to be absorbed. Human Transit will serve you well as a source you can turn to for reference in the future. It will also make you a better new urbanist.”

(Better! Cities and Towns)

 "Human Transit is well organized with short chapters and clear diagrams to illustrate some of the more complex concepts ... Walker does a good job of avoiding transportation planning jargon and makes careful choices about terminology... His writing style makes it easy to understand types of running ways, the reasons agencies are concerned about farebox returns, and the benefits of new technologies such as Smartcards." 
(Journal of Planning and Education Research)

“Intelligent, refreshing, balanced and richly mindful of the unique settings of individual communities.”
(Douglas MacDonald Former Secretary, Washington State Department of Transportation)

About the Author

Jarrett Walker has been designing public transit systems for over 20 years.  He is an independent consultant in North America and Principal Consultant with MRCagney in Australia.  He writes the popular transit blog HumanTransit.org.

More About the Author

Jarrett Walker is an international consultant in public transit network design and policy, and the author of the popular public transit blog HumanTransit.org. He is the founder of Jarrett Walker + Associates (jarrettwalker.com) in North America and is also Principal Consultant with MRCagney Consultants in Australia and New Zealand. He is a frequent public speaker and media commentator on public transit issues.

He has been a full-time consultant since 1991 and has led countless major planning projects in North America, Australia, and New Zealand. All of these studies have dealt with improving public transit and its role in fostering better communities.

Born in 1962, he grew up in Portland, Oregon during the revolutionary 1970s, the era when Portland first made its decisive commitment to be a city for people rather than cars. Though always fascinated by transit, he went on to complete a Ph.D. in humanities and theatre arts at Stanford University before becoming a fulltime transit planner, and he retains a commitment to viewing transit and urban issues from both humanistic and technical perspectives.

He has lived in San Francisco, Paris, Sydney, and Vancouver, and is now based in Portland, Oregon.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 17 customer reviews
Useful whether you're a planning professional or interested citizen.
C4
I strongly recommend Jarret's book and you will find the read easy but filled with enough technical expertise not to be boring or repetitive.
Fred
Smart decisions now can mean big savings and a better lifestyle in the future.
R. Baron

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Darren B on April 25, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book before taking a graduate public transportation planning class, and I'm glad that I did. Mr Walker's book reads EXACTLY as he describes up front - he explains in extremely plain yet precise language the theories that underlie how transit systems operate, the decision points that planners face, and most importantly, the real-world impacts of those decisions. I learned FAR more from this book than in an entire semester of grad class - I was equipped to take in the theoretical stuff the professor taught, and quickly translate that into how it might have real-world impacts on how people travel. For anyone interested in understanding the different ways that transit operates, and how there are so many decisions that can impact how much utility your community gets out of it, MUST READ.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brad on March 12, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book will give you talking points that are both solid and intuitive. For example the when thinking about a route it is all about geometry, not vehicle type. Or that most decision makers are motorists so they tend to think (unintentionally) like motorists so they value speed of frequency. This is a well written book, I know the author works in the Pacific Rim but I like to see some more thoughts on Eastern U.S. transit systems.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. Baron on May 15, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As someone who primarily uses a car and occasionally uses transit, I felt that this book opened my eyes to the possibilities of transit. Some big tools that I'm already putting to good use: (1) make sure new development is "on the way" of a transit system; and, (2) frequency is freedom.

This book is a must for those involved in development (or redevelopment) of their town. Smart decisions now can mean big savings and a better lifestyle in the future.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Lewyn VINE VOICE on November 3, 2013
Format: Paperback
Most public discussion of public transit is not particularly sophisticated: much public discussion is limited to "for it" or "against it", or perhaps focused on the virtues of bus vs. rail.

Walker reminds us that there are a wide variety of tradeoffs even if we agree on these basic issues. For example, should we provide a few routes that run frequently, or a larger number of less frequent routes? Should routes stop every block or stop every several blocks to make service faster? To what extent should routes be concentrated in peak hours? Walker suggests that our strategies should depend on our goals. Is it more important to provide service for everyone who can't drive, or is it more important to maximize ridership in order to reduce pollution? If the latter goal is more important, frequency and speed matter more- if the former, it is better to have a larger number of routes even if they run more slowly.

Walker addresses a variety of other interesting issues. For example:

*Why don't transit agencies use smaller buses? If (as Walker suggests) transit operating costs are primarily labor costs, transit agencies don't save much money by operating smaller vehicles.

*Why does New York have much higher transit ridership than Los Angeles, despite the latter region's higher average density? Walker points out that New York has more people living at the highest densities, while Los Angeles is more dominated by mid-density neighborhoods that are just barely sparse enough to be car-oriented.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By TransitStudent on October 13, 2012
Format: Paperback
As a planning student, this book was immensely helpful. Using sound arguments, Mr. Walker explains transit in a way that is....helpful. Too often people focus on what is not important, and this book fills in the gaps of what is usually left out. Not technical or overly verbose, this book was quite enjoyable and immensely informative.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By t0wnp1ann3r on April 8, 2012
Format: Paperback
The author does a great job of running through the fundamentals of how transit works in a community without being too prescriptive. The analysis of issues such as "being on the way" and connections (transfers in the US) make the study of a transit network accessible to anyone with a few hours to spare for this great book. I'm already about to read it a second time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By iTodd on April 18, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Jarrett Walker definetely has a unique and great approach to public design. One of the most influential books in the transport engineering arena.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven Dorst on February 27, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Jarrett presents the issues faced by anyone who cares about transit (and I include laymen, citizen activists, planners and politicians) in clear - and occasionally stark - terms that anyone can understand. He avoids jargon wherever he can: and when he can't, he defines the terms he must use well.

I particularly appreciated his simple diagrams which he skillfully combines with real world examples.

Finally, he (at least in this book) isn't partisan. There are tough decisions faced in considering transit, many of which are between two (or more) contradictory goals. He explains them well, but doesn't try to force you towards his preferred answer. Indeed, he explicitly recognizes that these are fundamentally political decisions and, as such, lays out the planner's duty to both inform the politicians on the need for (and consequences of) fundamental decisions and to design a system that follows once the political decisions are made.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa8b53810)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?