Buy New
$25.34
Qty:1
  • List Price: $34.95
  • Save: $9.61 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 18? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Trade in your item
Get a $4.12
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Humanae Vitae: A Generation Later Paperback


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$343.87
Paperback
"Please retry"
$25.34
$20.95 $12.05 $19.75

Frequently Bought Together

Humanae Vitae: A Generation Later + Why Humanae Vitae Was Right: A Reader
Price for both: $47.96

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 425 pages
  • Publisher: Catholic Univ of Amer Pr (November 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813207401
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813207407
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #792,752 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Smith reviews the controversies preceding and following Pope Paul VI's 1968 encyclical forbidding artificial birth control, giving special attention to the views of today's Pope John Paul II. Agreeing with the Vatican's stance, he typically presents dissenting viewpoints briefly, then refutes them with lengthy reviews of the works of theologians/philosophers opposing contraception. Contemporary overpopulation concerns receive minimal attention, though other factors are thoroughly discussed. Smith includes a new annotated translation of the encyclical. His densely argued, unyielding approach probably will convert few birth control advocates. Buy where interest warrants.
- Richard S. Watts, San Bernardino Cty. Lib., Cal.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Presents a comprehensive review of Pope Paul VI's encyclical on birth control . . . and the controversy which resulted. Smith discusses with great thoroughness: the beginnings of the debate; the Christian understanding of marriage and procreation; . . . the aftermath of Humanae Vitae and the 'revision' of natural law. . . . -- Theology Digest

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
My son, a Theology teacher is very pleased with it.
Carmen Solorzano
Without such an understanding of human nature it is very difficult to understand the problems with contraception.
FrDylan F James
Excellent resource for understanding the document and the issues.
EAJ

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Edward J. Baker on February 3, 1999
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Dominant liberal sentiment concerning the unending crisis in the Catholic Church usually involves the imaging of a heroic flock of dissident Catholics bravely questioning their authoritarian church, often defending themselves as acting out the admonishment of Vatican II to recognize the "spirit of the times." The effect amongst many Western Catholic intellectuals has been to exercise a nebulous acquiescence to the prevailing ethos of the well educated, even when the well educated seek active participation in the sex revolution, seemingly oblivious to its self-destructive character. It is no secret that the focal point of Catholic dissidence has been towards Humanae Vitae.
Janet E Smith is a Catholic philosopher with an essential premise. Living with a respect for God would seem to imply a willingness to seek an understanding of and conformity to the will of God, particularly, as she explores in this book, on the matter of contraception. If this is not what we seek, then our questioning may be the sort designed to avoid rather than find answers.
The very attempt to develop this purified sense of the will of God is viewed as upsetting to a great many contemporary Catholics, embarrassed by their faith and angry at those resistant to popular trends. So intense is this anger, that on occasions of her public lectures on the subject of contraception, even on Catholic university campuses, Ms. Smith has been greeted with rude, at times vitriolic, interruptions to her speeches, situations she has always met with unflappable grace and dignity. Because she is always seeking a faithful receptivity towards the mind of God as a first principle, she refuses to be unkind in return.
Honest philosophers have always sought to know what is natural and implicit in God's design. Ms.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Lindsay on February 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
In this, her first book, university professor Janet Smith presents a philosophical and theological understanding of Pope Paul VI's controversial 1968 encyclical `Humanae Vitae' (`On Human Life'). The 370 densely packed pages of text are divided into eight chapters and four appendices.
In the first chapter Dr. Smith gives a very brief historical overview of the Church's consistent condemnation of contraception whenever the issue arose. It was not until 1930 that the Anglican Church's Lambeth Conference "broke ranks with nearly the whole of the traditional Christian opposition to contraception" when it permitted its use by married couples "for grave reasons." Pope Pius XI responded with an encyclical entitled `Casti Cannubi' that reiterated the opposition, encouraged elevated notions of conjugal love and parenthood, and explained that confining conjugal acts to known infertility periods, for right reasons, was morally permissible. Some Catholic theologians began opposing the teaching in 1963 and by 1966 it was the major moral issue troubling the Church. Smith claims this came about because of the development of the Pill and social changes rather than from philosophical deliberations. She spends the bulk of the chapter examining the arguments of a papal commission divided over the issue in the years just prior to `Humanae Vitae.'
Smith begins chapter two by stating, "`Humanae Vitae,' depends on a Christian understanding of the nature or meaning of marriage and in particular on a Christian understanding of the importance of the marital gift of having children" (p.36). She then examines Catholic teaching on this matter as found in `Casti Cannubi' and relevant portions of the Vatican II document `Gaudium et Spes.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By FrDylan F James on February 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
In my opinion, this book should be considered the classic text on contraception, as believed by the Roman Catholic Church. Janet Smith outlines a series of different arguments against contraception, and shows how they are all rooted in the classic Catholic view of human nature. The strength of this book is its thorough description of human nature and Natural Law, as understood in the Catholic Tradition. I'd thus rank this book highly as a general book on Natural Law, and the some of the theological anthropology implicit in it. Without such an understanding of human nature it is very difficult to understand the problems with contraception. By point of contrast, she critiques the 'contra-life will' arguement proposed by Grisez etc. One feature that I found particularly useful was her analysis of how contraception has affected society, and the link between contraception and divorce. One warning: this book is for the serious student. However, it lays out the principles it builds on, and when I first read it was able to understand it even though the material was all new to me.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Radoslav L on March 4, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I recommend this I recommend this book which is useful not only for its masterful summary of the moral magisterium on bioethics, but also for its treatment of such various issues in bioethics today.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa2b90780)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?