Humanité has been added to your Cart

Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Humanité
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Humanité


Price: $59.95 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by The Squirrel with the Dragon Tattoo and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
3 new from $59.95 7 used from $20.99
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$59.95
$59.95 $20.99
$59.95 & FREE Shipping. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by The Squirrel with the Dragon Tattoo and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Editorial Reviews

Bruno Dumont’s (The Life of Jesus) controversial and award-winning film follows a police detective trying to solve a brutal rape and murder of an 11 year-old girl.

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Emmanuel Schotté, Séverine Caneele, Philippe Tullier, Ghislain Ghesquère, Darius
  • Directors: Bruno Dumont
  • Writers: Bruno Dumont
  • Producers: Jean Bréhat, Rachid Bouchareb
  • Format: Color, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Fox Lorber
  • DVD Release Date: February 13, 2001
  • Run Time: 148 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000056HTM
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,640 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Humanité" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

French subtlety at work!
Robert Amsel
He lives with his mother and is almost a neighbour of a very alluring woman whose lover dislikes him.
Hiram Gomez Pardo
After viewing it, I feel like I completely wasted my time and money.
Larry L. Looney

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By mackjay on April 19, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
"L'Humanité" is a fine example of a film that takes some time to absorb. This is to say, not just the amount of time it takes to watch the 2 and one-half hour film, but the time required afterwards for contemplation. The style and pacing of Bruno Dumont's film are so striking that the viewer needs some distance to sort out what has been experienced. Most closely resembling that of Michelangelo Antonioni, the style of "L'Humanité" consists of long takes, occasional slow pans and sparse dialogue. As with the great Italian director, characters here seem to live on the surface of some undiscovered emotional realm. They seem to grope constantly, at a loss for words, for something that lies beneath.
In an interview, Dumont has said that he wrote the leading role of Pharaon after meeting the actor Emmanuel Schotte. A previous conception of the screenplay was rejected and Dumont fashioned the character upon the first-time actor's real personality. This is a case of an actor really being exactly like the part he plays. In fact, Dumont chose all amateurs to play in this film because he did not want associations made with name actors. This possibly explains the striking truthfulness of the three central performances.
Dumont sets up, in this film, a kind of laboratory situation. The viewer is confronted with a seemingly enigmatic main character. At first it may be wondered if a connection should be made between Pharaon and the rape/murder is investigating. There is a connection, but not the most obvious one. We are made, at several points, to experience Pharaon's RESPONSE to the act of this murder: most often an inarticulate scream. Pharaon is chosen as the main focus because of his own history: some time in the past he had, and lost, a wife and child of his own.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Rimorin on February 28, 2002
Format: DVD
Pharoan de Wilder, the police superintendant of a small French city between Lille and Paris and protagonist in Dumont's "L'humanité," is far, far from the gruff detectives encountered in policiers and film noir. In his blank unblinking face and in his childlike padding through his investigation and life are family resemblances to the characters living in Bresson's movies, masterpieces of no action and less reaction. De Wilder, however, may also be related in some fashion to his titular compatriot, the late Inspector Clouseau.
Clouseau's cousin in a Bressonian film? The juxtaposition is facetious, and while watching the first revelatory and masterful half of this film, you would think such glibness on my part not only, well, glib, but outright barbaric. De Winter is investigating the murder of an 11-year-old girl in his small town; he is also little advanced beyond the mentality of an 11-year-old child himself. He lives with his mother, is devoted to his bicycle and his rose garden, and spends almost the whole of the movie in wide-eyed, half-confused regard of the world about him. He is drawn to animals and to the sun and limits himself to functional speech, often walking away in the middle of a conversation to stare out the window. In short, he is a complete cypher, unilluminated by the few details we are given (his girlfriend or wife and his child were killed or misplaced two years earlier; he served some time in the military; he ... at the keyboard) and thus perfect to project our own wants, desires, feelings and dreams upon.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 22, 2001
Format: DVD
Imagine for a moment that you're a cop in a small town out in the middle of nowhere where NOTHING ever happens. In addition, you live a dull, conservative life with your widowed mother. You have only 2 friends (not close ones) one of which you're in love with but can never fulfill it. Now... suppose a shocking "big city" murder did happen and it was your sole responsibility to find out who did it. You have very little clues, no support and no one that you feel comfortable enough to confide in. That would be pretty frustrating right? It would obsess your conscience 24/7 and affect what little social skills you have already. That is the very thing that makes L'Humanite work!!! This is a film based on one frustrated man's efforts to solve an evil crime. Its long, exhaustive and at times frustrating JUST LIKE THE CASE WOULD BE IN REAL LIFE. I commend Bruno Dumont for creating something so non-spectacular and believable. The world has had its fill of Bruce Willis shoot-em-up cop movies. I saw this film last year after it deservedly won the Grand Prize at Cannes. The fact that a whole year later, I'm still moved by what I saw, makes L'Humanite a 5-star film.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Hiram Gomez Pardo HALL OF FAME on June 23, 2008
Format: DVD
Bruno Dumont's sensible and artistic project seems to work out as a heartfelt testimonial in memory of Robert Bresson, who curiously died the same year.

Because L' humanite isn't by far, an easy film to watch. It has a very deliberately slow paced rhythm that may even desperate the most `patient spectator. After the image is exposed, is frozen and underlined to permeate its whole significance into the dramatic structure.

The first scene with the opened objective reveals us the true essence of our main personage. An introverted human being, a police officer who lost his wife and daughter two years ago, is terribly beaten by a dreadful disgrace that shocks the small community, when a child is raped and murdered.

This sensible man knows to conceal his feelings and temptations. He lives with his mother and is almost a neighbour of a very alluring woman whose lover dislikes him. Nevertheless there's a symbiotic relationship encouraged by her every time they decide to get fun.

Slow and progressively every personage will show us its necessities of be loved and estimated. The loneliness of his soul is remarked by the camera over and over. His way of walking, the introverted character and in general the complex web of relations he must face respect the outer social world, the relentless landscapes impregnated of serene beauty contrasts with the bleak hovering atmosphere. Just to think in that absurd death conveys him to the last frontier of the anger and unless cry of indignation and pain.

The last sequence is stu8nning due he is expressing that coveted desire of redemption, although he is aware the level of unforgiving atrocity that crime has represented in the community.

Admirable film that must be seen keeping in mind the poetic dimension is by far from being a guest star, it's the main star.

An emblematic masterwork!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?