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39 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent and thoughtful approach to Apologetics
John Stackhouse book is lucid, winsome, and profoundly Christian - I commend it to all those who take Scripture seriously, are theologically orthodox, and desire to be a humble, earnest, and reflective witness for Christ in a world marked by relativism and religious skepticism on one hand, and defensive and insular biblicism on the other.
With reference to the...
Published on January 26, 2003 by Dan Olson

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent Book
This was recommended to me by a friend and I found it to be excellent. The book generally got better as I turned the pages. At first Stackhouse had a habit of saying things about pluralism, postmodernism and consumerism that I already knew but when I reached the second and third parts of the book where he speaks of conversion and communicating apologetically, I was...
Published on June 25, 2009 by Ronald C. Payne


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39 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent and thoughtful approach to Apologetics, January 26, 2003
By 
Dan Olson (Vancouver, BC CANADA) - See all my reviews
John Stackhouse book is lucid, winsome, and profoundly Christian - I commend it to all those who take Scripture seriously, are theologically orthodox, and desire to be a humble, earnest, and reflective witness for Christ in a world marked by relativism and religious skepticism on one hand, and defensive and insular biblicism on the other.
With reference to the previous reviewers, this book is good enough that I must defend it against those who seem to have missed the point.
To begin, Stackhouse in no way "bows to contemporary intellectual trends." He is thoroughly orthodox but merely recognizes the fact of ethical and religious pluralism (look around), and never encourages Christians to affirm the truth of other faiths. Instead, he clearly and humorously helps one understand the current epistemological situation... then encourages the Christian community to witness by example and through humble and earnest dialogue. Instead of flagrantly and arrogantly condemning other faiths, he encourages the Christian to thoughtfully and respectfully commend the Christian faith, arguing if necessary, but always in a spirit of respect and love. This seems to me the most effective, and most Christlike, approach - lovingly bringing in the Kingdom of God one relationship at a time.
With regards to religious exclusivism, it seems to me that theologically he would fall into this camp (contrary to the comments of "a reader") - however, Stackhouse rightly affirms the obvious: since we are not God, we are not privy to certaintly about the eternal status of others; therefore our only recourse is to earnestly and lovingly (and, if needed, argumentatively) commend the faith to those we meet, always respecting the other's freedom and intellectual integrity - recognizing that everyone always has reasons for what they believe... regardless of how coherent (or incoherent) they are. No doubt Paul in Athens (Acts 17) is a perfect example, even appropriating ways in which the Epicurean and Stoic philosophies pointed to Christian truth (by quoting their texts...find any commentary).
Regarding what "First Theology" writes about "humanistic and secular philosophies", I'm not certain exactly what his issue is. Stackhouse recognizes that obvious: that when we live in a religiously pluralist society, a reflective person can't but recognize that others hold other mutually exclusive positions, making certainty a bit more tenuous. However, amidst this new situation, Stackhouse rightly maintains Christianity's uniqueness - perhaps not as winsomely agressive as, say, G.K. Chesterton... but that is not his purpose. His approach merely suggests that returning to an age of heretic-burning isn't merited. (I might add that Stackhouse may agree with N.T. Wright that biblical literalists may reflect "humanist and secular philosophies" (more specifically Western materialism, a.k.a. postivism) more than other Christian traditions - thus allowing "First Theology" to know certainly and completely "what the Bible teaches"... treating scripture (particularly the N.T.) as a store-house of mere propositional and literal truth, which reflects a way of thinking about Scripture resulting from the Enlightenment (post-18th century) and narrowed during the Biblical inerrancy debates of the last 130 years... (Cf. The New Testament and the People of God, Ch. 2).)
Previous reviewers, and others immersed in a Christian sub-culture no doubt realize there are contentious issues of debate, but Stackhouse (I think rightly) outlines an appropriate (and may I reiterate, thoroughly orthodox) approach, recognizing that in commending the faith to one's neighbor, one must start from common ground. With the most important insight being that the example of Christlike love is the most cogent and convicting of arguments.
After reading this, if you want to burn me at the stake, then you won't enjoy "Humble Apologetics"... if this resonates with you - then Stackhouse is a wise and humble guide for Apologists everywhere. Remember, though, his book isn't a compendium of arguments, but an insightful and wise APPROACH to our faith's defense.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Encouraging of a gentler, more respectful apologetic, June 16, 2005
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John Stackhouse Jr., is professor of theology and culture at Regent College, Vancouver, Canada. He is an award-winning historian, philosopher, theologian, journalist, and teacher. In this stirring volume Stackhouse draws upon each of these areas of expertise in order to persuade us that defending the faith (much-maligned as it is) can be and ought to be undertaken humbly. For Stackhouse, the practice of apologetics can be interesting and important, or offensive and therefore self-defeating; to ensure that it is the former and not the latter which prevails, Stackhouse has authored this volume with the intent of presenting a way "of engaging in worthwhile apologetical conversation without perverting it into a destructive exercise in triumphalism" (p. xvi).

Not dissimilar from recent texts on apologetics and evangelism by a number of L'Abri related authors (e.g. Os Guinness, Bill Edgar, Dick Keyes and Jerram Barrs); Humble Apologetics also shares some affinity with the apologetic writings of the late Francis Schaeffer. This is true not merely in terms of tone and awareness of cultural crosscurrents and their impact upon the task of witness-bearing, but perhaps most especially in the way that Stackhouse exhibits his concern for the ones to whom our apologetics are directed. (Like Schaeffer, Stackhouse is eager that our practice of apologetics open up and illumine a way forward and not wound, shut down, or cause someone to turn back from faith).

Full of sage advice and helpful pastoral notes, Humble Apologetics is nevertheless uncluttered and can be outlined quickly and easily. Parts one and two helpfully delineate the milieu in which we are called upon to defend the faith and explain what defending the faith means and involves. Here, pluralism, postmodernism and consumerism are cited as crucial challenges to Christian apologetics. The problem of plausibility-i.e. of our culture's particular resistance to biblical Christianity-is also raised and addressed. Apologetics itself is finally defined and defended and the basic epistemological matters underlying a humble apologetic are discussed. Part three," the payoff section" (p.xvii), weaves the various threads together by suggesting principles of communication, by endorsing audience-specific apologetics and by listing a dozen guidelines for apologetic conversation. Concerned that theology and philosophy not monopolize, Stackhouse draws attention to other modes of apologetics and offers a concluding chapter in which he once again drives home the importance and necessity of practicing humble apologetics.

While some have baulked at the contours of Stackhouse's proposal, labeling it "postmodern" and charging that it harbors too low a view of apologetic argumentation and its outcomes (Groothuis, Books & Culture); others have dismissed it altogether, decrying it as "unbiblical and outrageous" (Cheung, Reformation Ministries International). Though such conclusions seem hasty and tend to overlook the many strengths of this volume (too many to register here), yet there are occasions in which Stackhouse's language can be said to court the disapproval of those committed to a more corpulent and virile apologetic. Examples of this would include his insistence on speaking about worldviews, including Christianity, as "hypotheses-intelligent guesses-that are always subject to further tryouts" (p.87-89); his unnuanced assertion that "No human being knows anything for certain" (p.166); as well as his conclusion: "For all we know, we might be wrong about any or all of this" (p.232; italics are the author's). Nonetheless, while I too feel that Stackhouse may have overreached in some of his comments, yet I remain an ardent admirer of this work for two reasons.

First, it simply must be admitted that certainty is a problematic concept. For even though God wants us to be certain of our salvation and of the truth of Christianity, and even though He supplies us with the resources we need to come to a point of confident assurance regarding the essential elements of the gospel message (the concern of Groothuis and others), yet this does not prevent doubt from arising and neither does it nullify the difficulties Stackhouse addresses. Therefore, disagreement withstanding, I am certain (oops!) that I stand to gain much from interacting with this work

Second, although I reject E. J. Carnell's verificationist approach to apologetics (his offering of God and Christianity as hypotheses to be tested by autonomous man) and although I continue to have questions about the Reformed epistemology of Plantinga and Wolterstorff (which informs and gives shape to Stackhouse's epistemology); yet I can happily utilize and endorse this work when I bear in mind the author's intent. For having read and re-read Humble Apologetics, it does not seem that Stackhouse has capitulated to postmodernism and wants to topple the edifice of sure knowledge as much as he wants us to recognize the milieu we are a part of and the apologetic impact of respecting our epistemic limitations. Neither does Stackhouse suggest that other religious and philosophical options are equal to or better than Christianity, only that for various cultural and sociological reasons such alternatives may and often do appeal to others with a force that we must not underestimate or ignore. In short, Stackhouse is alert to the fact that in our present culture we cannot go out and argue from a position of obvious certainty, we must argue from a position of plausibility asking those in front of us to consider "Might not this be true?"

So then, bearing in mind the author's intent, I find Stackhouse's reflections on how we do or approach apologetics to convey a welcome and much-needed emphasis. Indeed, whatever might be said about the idiosyncrasies of this work, it remains a solid contribution towards creating and encouraging a gentler, more respectful apologetic (cf. 1 Peter 3:15). In his reconfiguring of apologetics Stackhouse has removed trumpery, clipped the wings of pride and managed to exalt character and loving respect for others without dumbing down apologetics. In essence, he pushes us to engage not just ideas, but people; to reject not only arid intellectualism but acrid uncharitability as well. Such factors make Stackhouse `highly recommended reading' for all would-be apologists.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent Book, June 25, 2009
This review is from: Humble Apologetics: Defending the Faith Today (Paperback)
This was recommended to me by a friend and I found it to be excellent. The book generally got better as I turned the pages. At first Stackhouse had a habit of saying things about pluralism, postmodernism and consumerism that I already knew but when I reached the second and third parts of the book where he speaks of conversion and communicating apologetically, I was hooked. I found myself whispering "yes" out loud in those parts of the book as he clearly articulated many points that I've thought in my reflections on the proper use of apologetics in evangelism as well as the nature of conversion. Reading this book was like emerging from forty days in the proverbial desert of conservative evangelical thought on this aspect of Christianity.

This book clearly refuted the evangelistic methods of Ray Comfort in my mind. (If you don't know who Ray Comfort is consider yourself fortunate.) Ray separates evangelism and apologetics in his mind, embracing a crude caricature of the former while completely discounting the latter. In reality, apologetics and evangelism go together because one has to put on the evangelist's hat to communicate the good news of the gospel and use apologetics when one is challenged about the veracity or goodness of that news. Apologetics, meaning the art of defending the faith and advancing the faith intellectually to others, needs to be conducted with humility always in mind, since God incarnated himself here on Earth in humility. Also, the current challenges of postmodernism and pluralism to the Christian message can't be dealt with if we are puffed up with pride. The apostle Paul had this principle in mind when he spoke to the Corinthians not in "lofty words" but in "fear and trembling." Intellectual honesty was also stressed in this book. When engaging our non-Christian peers we must remember that the whole of Christianity does not depend just on our efforts or our words. We shouldn't try to bring people to a "crisis point" where they either choose to accept or reject Christianity. Instead we must remember that most will not change their whole worldview just because someone presents a good argument. Engaging the evangelism and apologetics is a team effort and we are only called to play a part. In actuality, real change in that unbeliever's life can only come through the providence of the Holy Spirit.

This book has successfully inspired me to actually engage with my neighbors on these matters. I think that was the main strength of the book. One doesn't have to have all the answers, but can focus on nudging others towards the faith without being overly pushy. The gospel is the power of God unto salvation. We are just clay vessels called to be co-workers of Christ in this venture. I heartily recommend this book for anyone who is struggling with how one ought to go about engaging in apologetic discussions with non-believers. I also think this applies to believers as well who need encouragement and care to proceed along the path of sanctification in the faith.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Practical Apologetics, December 2, 2002
By 
John Craig Colbert (Columbia, MO United States) - See all my reviews
I think Stackhouse hits the nail on the head. Apologetics is a means to an end and not an end in itself. Stackhouse is concerned that people far from God have an opportunity to see Jesus and His life and teachings in ways that are relevant to their lives. I too have been embarrassed by Christian apologists who may "win" the argument, but repel people from the truth by their smug arrogance. In the postmodern context of our culture today the messenger is, in some sense, the message. The message and the manner in which it is delivered is critical. Jesus, the Bible says, was full of truth, but he was also full of grace. Stackhouse restores a Biblical balance to the issue of apologetics
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Apologetics for Our Times, July 12, 2008
This review is from: Humble Apologetics: Defending the Faith Today (Paperback)
John Stackhouse is fast becoming one of my favorite writers. His book Humble Apologetics is a winsome approach to offering our apologia -- the reasons for the hope that is within us -- in our pluralistic world.

A substantial strength of this book is Stackhouse's admonishment that we engage in apologetics that are appropriate to our cultural time and place. The Church no longer dominates western society, and basic Christian truths are no longer assumed. for many who are engaged in the culture wars, these facts are cause for, well, war. But as Stackhouse notes,

"[w]hat is not so clear to many Christians . . . is that multiculturalism and extensive religious plurality can offer an opportunity for Christians to shed the baggage of cultural dominance that has often impeded or distorted the spread of the gospel. It may be, indeed, that the decline of Christian hegemony can offer the Church the occasion to adopt a new and more effective stance of humble service toward societies it no longer controls."

This call to an apologetic based on service is much needed today.

Stackhouse also helpfully critiques apologetic efforts that require one person to answer every question and provoke a moment of crisis in order to close the deal. As Stackhouse notes,

"[w]hen it comes to anything important in life as a Christian, and particularly in apologetic conversation that aims to benefit the neighbor, we remember this cardinal principle: You can't do it all no matter what you do, so don't try! We are part of the Church, which itself is only one corporate player in God's great mission of global peacemaking. We must do just what we each can do, and trust the rest of the Church and God himself to do their parts as well."

A key point here is that apologetics, like every other endeavor in the Christian life, is about love, not about "winning" arguments.

Like all work on apologetics, Stackhouse's broader project is epistemological -- the question "how do we know and what can we know it" relates directly to the question "what reasons can we present to others for belief in Christ." He notes that

"[w]e Christians should not need postmodernists to tell us that we do not know it all. We should not need anyone to tell us that all human thought is partial, distorted, and usually deployed in the interest of this or that personal agenda. . . . We recognize, ultimately, that to truly believe, to truly commit oneself to God, is itself a gift that God alone bestows. Conversion is a gift. Faith is a gift. God alone can change minds so that those minds can both see and embrace the great truths of the gospel, and the One who stands at their center."

Not surprisingly, some rationalist evangelicals have criticized this call to epistemic humility. In my view, however, Stackhouse hits the epistemic nail on the head. A holistic apologetic, that treats others as fellow human beings rather than targets, one way or another will recognize that we don't know it all, and will point away from ourselves to Christ. This is the ultimate goal of all the arguments and evidence we can muster.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This Book Nails IT!, December 6, 2009
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Understanding the conglomerate of nuances that collectively are called the "shift" from Modernism to postModernity is not a simple matter. John has set forth one of the best delineated analysis/synthesis presentations of the transition I have ever read. though we have moved beyond postModernism into a truly postChristian era in the West his insights are quite helpful in plotting future shifts short of 2012 (whatever that is).
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4.0 out of 5 stars Positive, November 30, 2014
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I appreciated this literary work not for any methodology offered in it, but for the resounding demeanor advocated. As Christians we are not called to tear down our opponents, but to build them up in the act of apologetics. We desire them to flourish in the message of the gospel, not to be embittered by it. This is why I would recommend this to any Christian that claims the gospel of Christ and actively seeks to further His kingdom. We need to adorn ourselves in humility when engaging the world around us. Furthermore, we need to understand that our pursuits in the field of apologetics is intended to increase the praise of God and win our neighbor into his loving kindness through the efficacious work of the Holy Spirit.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A good apologetic spirit to maintain, but no real reasoned defense of the faith, January 6, 2014
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In his book, Humble Apologetics, John Stackhouse Jr. advocates for a different approach to Christian apologetics. He believes Christians have been too cocky and too presumptuous with the truth they have. Rather than boast in their beliefs or act as if the unbeliever is a complete fool, Christians need to admit they don't have all the answers; they are in a sense just as epistemically helpless as their neighbor; and that we are all in this together in a search for truth.

The method sounds somewhat appealing in principle. Christians should be humble. We should neve beat unbelievers over the head with our beliefs or apologetic proofs. Instead, we should seek to listen, to empathize, and to persuade people to Christ with our lives, behaviors, and attitudes.

But, what, if any, advantages does Stackhouses's model for apologetics really have over other approaches? None. Allow me to explain. First, Stackhouse's model, as described in pp. 161-205, isn't really a model per se. By his own description, he's offering "a dozen guidelines for apologetic conversation."[1] I would supplement this description with related terms like values, principles, and guiding philosophy. These are more of a spirit to maintain not so much a methodology to be carried out. Focusing on Jesus, knowing when to be minimal or maximal, and taking the objections of unbelievers seriously are not exactly systematic apologetic procedures and strategies to follow. Again, they are the heart guiding the mind of apologetics.

Secondly, and along with this last thought, each of the other apologetic approaches could add these same guidelines to their methodologies. For example, as the classical apologist attempts to defend the faith through rational means, he could "first, listen and understand;" "take it seriously;" "teach first, preach second;" and so on through each of Stackhouse's twelve guidelines. There is nothing explicit about the claims of Stackhouse that would exclude other apologetic approaches from also integrating them into their own models. On the contrary, Stackhouse even gives examples of this crossover ability by citing apologists from other apologetic traditions who held the same beliefs he is propagating (i.e. Francis Schaeffer).[2] In summary, his principles are hardly foreign to the other four main apologetic approaches, nor can they be exclusive to his proposed approach.

Third, any gray area existing in the discussion of methodological superiority arises from Stackhouse's improper blurring of lines of distinction in the terms and goals involved in the discussion. He creates false dichotomies between:

1) empathy and reason/logic, as if Christians can only hold to one or the other;
2) offering and demanding, as if apologists can't offer definitive defenses for Christianity that would rationally silence the objector's challenges; and
3) faithful defense of Christianity and persuasion, the former Christians are called to do while the latter is ultimately up to God (even by Stackhouse's own admission).[3]

This last point is worthy of expounding because it reveals an even bigger misconception Stackhouse has regarding apologetics. Stackhouse seems to be advocating for conversion of those he apologetically interacts with, which is of course a noble goal. But, in his urgency for conversion, he loses the immediate goal of apologetics, which is simply to defend the faith. In other words, Stackhouse has blurred the lines between evangelism and apologetics, and in doing so, distorts some key concepts regarding apologetics (more on this shortly). For instance, the example of the father and daughter grossed out by the Cross is not an apologetic situation until they challenge the claims of Christianity; at that point, it is a witnessing situation where the Cross can be explained (then should they object, the evangelist can switch over into apologetics). Further examples of Stackhouse's calling evangelistic situations apologetic ones include his citing of the Jesus encounter with the woman at the well (this was more prophetic evangelism than an apologetic situation with Jesus defending the faith against an objector);[4] the story of Nathaniel in John 1 isn't what we would call an apologetical situation (again not apologetic in the historic sense);[5] and his citation of John's intro to his first epistle is also not apologetic in nature (in the first place, John was writing to the church, not to unbelieving objectors; but in any case, there John is "declaring," or heralding, what he has seen and heard, in other words he is not doing apologetics, where defending the faith is primary).[6] Finally, near the end of the chapter, Stackhouse even goes into a full-on appeal for everyone needing a gospel witness, to which he is correct; but again, that is not the same call as the apologetic call.[7]

This blurring of the lines between theological disciplines (evangelism and apologetics) causes Stackhouse to unnecessarily concede points to unbelievers that he does not need to, as well as actually increase his apologetical burden. For example, while I appreciate the assertion that we should embrace Christianity's strangeness, the reality is that all worldviews involve a degree of strangeness in the metaphysical/origins sense that Stackhouse is referring to.[8] Saying we came from atoms (of unknown origins) that mysteriously exploded into the complexity of life before us is pretty strange too. That said, at a presuppositional level, Christianity may actually be the least strange choice out there, since it alone can sensibly provide for the preconditions for intelligibility. Another example is his continued insistence that one must become a convert or at least an expert of other religions before speaking to them from a Christian perspective; nowhere does the bible say we have to do either in order to evangelize, do apologetics, or even sympathize with members of other religions.[9] Furthermore, other religions have their own representatives articulating their views, defending their views, and comparing those views with those of other religions (like Christianity); so apologetics by no means necessitates either religious omniscience or silence.

Exegetically, Stackhouse's approach also impairs his biblical interpretation of certain passages (saying Jesus's call to follow Him was more indicative of a "try Me and see" as opposed to a call to complete surrender and discipleship).[10] Prescriptively, Stackhouse reduces the biblical call to give a defense for the hope within us to: "we are called simply to do the best we can do given the actual limitations of the situation... and hope it is a good gift."[11] Philosophically, Stackhouse grants unbelievers a pass on self-excepting fallacies (i.e. letting the postmodernist absolutely claim knowledge is unknowable).[12] Personally, Stackhouse seems committed to showing the Christian is equal to everyone else in the epistemological game of uncertainty, which seems slightly belittling to the Bible being God's self-revelation.[13] Finally, and in amplification of the previous point, Stackhouse claims that not only are we just seekers like everyone else, "We simply cannot assume that most people think as we do, know what we do, and care about what matters to us."[14] True, but we can presuppose the truths of the Bible and relate to them through the universality of biblical anthropology. If the Bible says all people are A, then we can apologetically proceed as though people we meet are A.

All of these shortcomings are the result of Stackhouse blurring lines of biblical disciplines; these are the implications that come with that. So, is his model better? No. Defending the faith does not mean persuasion, depreciating the value of biblical revelation, or feigning equality with those that know not God. It means biblically defending the Christian faith on its own terms.
________________________________________
[1] John G. Stackhouse and Jr, Humble Apologetics: Defending the Faith Today (New York: Oxford University Press, USA, 2006), 161.
[2] Ibid., 186.
[3] Ibid., 194.
[4] Ibid., 182-183.
[5] Ibid., 190.
[6] Ibid., 166.
[7] Ibid., 201.
[8] Ibid., 162.
[9] Ibid., 161-162; 164-166.
[10] Ibid., 190.
[11] Ibid., 167.
[12] Ibid., 170.
[13] Ibid., 171.
[14] Ibid., 178.
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4.0 out of 5 stars It is our purpose to be prepared as Christians, January 24, 2015
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As our society becomes more divers and pluralistic we need to equip ourselves as Christians. We can no longer be a silent majority. The Authors approach to not be confrontational, but find common ground, and speak the truth with humility is refreshing
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Humble Apologetics, November 4, 2012
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A fair read. Stackhouse raises some valid points aplogeticists should consider when engaging in debate, i.e. be respectful of the other's positions and beliefs. However, the book develops slowly, is somewhat tedious and over states it's theme while undervaluing apologetics, even "dis-ing" several prominent Christian apologeticists, as a faithful means for intelligently defending one's of faith in the face skeptical accusations.

Though his 230 page theme is well taken, Humble Apologetics does little to hone one's knowledge or skill in defending the Christian faith... it missed the mark.
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Humble Apologetics: Defending the Faith Today
Humble Apologetics: Defending the Faith Today by John G. Stackhouse (Paperback - July 20, 2006)
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